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  1. Henry David Aiken (1950). A Pluralistic Analysis of Aesthetic Value. Philosophical Review 59 (4):493-513.
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  2. Carl Baker, The Limits of Faultless Disagreement.
    Some have argued that the possibility of faultless disagreement gives relativist semantic theories an important explanatory advantage over their absolutist and contextualist rivals. Here I combat this argument, focusing on the specific case of aesthetic discourse. My argument has two stages. First, I argue that while relativists may be able to account for the possibility of faultless aesthetic disagreement, they nevertheless face difficulty in accounting for the intuitive limits of faultless disagreement. Second, I develop a new non-relativist theory which can (...)
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  3. Monroe C. Beardsley (1962). Beauty and Aesthetic Value. Journal of Philosophy 59 (21):617-628.
    This paper affirms the proposition, denied by albert hofstadter ("journal of philosophy", volume 59, 1962), that the study of the meaning and ground of value judgments is a proper branch of aesthetics. hofstadter objects that the use of 'aesthetic value' involves a "category mistake"; however, this objection is based on an apparent failure to understand a derivative or instrumental definition. hofstadter's own position is also criticized. it is argued (a) that his theory of aesthetic validity, while commendable in some respects, (...)
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  4. William Bossart (1961). Authenticity and Aesthetic Value in the Visual Arts. British Journal of Aesthetics 1 (3):144-159.
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  5. Malcolm Budd (2006). Objectivity and the Aesthetic Value of Nature: Reply to Parsons. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (3):267-273.
    The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature I advance a view of the aesthetic value of nature that Glenn Parsons seeks to contest. Here I attempt to show three things. The first is that his critique of my view of the aesthetic value of a natural thing is malfounded. The second is that his proposed alternative, which is intended to vindicate the claim to objectivity of certain judgements of the aesthetic value of a natural thing, is unconvincing. And the third is that, (...)
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  6. Rolf Ekman (1963). Aesthetic Value and the Ethics of Life Affirmation. British Journal of Aesthetics 3 (1):54-66.
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  7. Richard M. Gaskin (1989). Can Aesthetic Value Be Explained? British Journal of Aesthetics 29 (4):329-340.
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  8. Bruce M. Gatenby (1994). Beauty and the Beastly Cause: Aesthetic Value, Anarchy, and the Theater of Representation in James'sthe Princess Casamassima. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (2):313-325.
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  9. Alan Goldman (2005). Beardsley's Legacy: The Theory of Aesthetic Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 63 (2):185–189.
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  10. Alan H. Goldman (2011). The Appeal of the Mystery. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):261-272.
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  11. Alan H. Goldman (2006). The Experiential Account of Aesthetic Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (3):333–342.
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  12. Alan H. Goldman (1995). Aesthetic Value. Westview Press.
    At the heart of aesthetics lie fundamental questions about value in art and the objectivity of aesthetic valuation. A theory of aesthetic value must explain how the properties of artworks contribute to the values derived from contemplating and appreciating works of art. When someone passes judgment on a work of art, just what is it that is happening, and how can such judgments be criticized and defended?In this concise survey, intended for advanced undergraduate students of aesthetics, Alan Goldman focuses on (...)
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  13. Alan H. Goldman (1995). The Aesthetic Value of Representation in Painting. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (2):297-310.
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  14. Alan H. Goldman (1990). Aesthetic Qualities and Aesthetic Value. Journal of Philosophy 87 (1):23-37.
    To say that an object is beautiful or ugly is seemingly to refer to a property of the object. But it is also to express a positive or negative response to it, a set of aesthetic values, and to suggest that others ought to respond in the same way. Such judg- ments are descriptive, expressive, and normative or prescriptive at once. These multiple features are captured well by Humean accounts that analyze the judgments as ascribing relational properties. To say that (...)
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  15. Hilde Hein (1994). Value Inquiry — Aesthetic Value. Journal of Value Inquiry 28 (2):141-149.
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  16. John Hoaglund (1976). Originality and Aesthetic Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 16 (1):46-55.
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  17. Lee Horvitz (1996). Aesthetic Value. Teaching Philosophy 19 (4):418-421.
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  18. Matthew Kieran (1997). Aesthetic Value: Beauty, Ugliness and Incoherence. Philosophy 72 (281):383 - 399.
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  19. Tomáš Kulka (2009). Why Aesthetic Value Judgements Cannot Be Justified. Estetika 46 (1):3-28.
    The article is part of a longer argument, the gist of which stands in direct opposition to the claim implied by the article’s title. The ambition of that larger whole is to offer a theory of art evaluation together with a theoretical model showing how aesthetic value judgements can be inter-subjectively tested and justified. Here the author therefore plays devil’s advocate by citing, strengthening, and inventing arguments against the very possibility of justification or explanation of aesthetic judgements. The reason is (...)
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  20. Tomas Kulka (1981). The Artistic and the Aesthetic Value of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (4):336-350.
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  21. Harold Newton Lee (1938). Perception and Aesthetic Value. New York, Prentice-Hall, Inc..
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  22. Listowel Listowel (1939). Perception and Aesthetic Value. By H. N. Lee. (New York: Prentice-Hall Inc. 1938. Pp. Xii + 271. Price $3.50.). Philosophy 14 (54):233-.
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  23. J. D. Logan (1901). The Source and Aesthetic Value of Permanency in Art and Literature. Philosophical Review 10 (1):36-44.
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  24. Ruth Lorand (1992). The Purity of Aesthetic Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (1):13-21.
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  25. A. G. Pleydell-Pearce (1967). Marx's Interpretation of Art and Aesthetic Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 7 (3):237-249.
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  26. Michael A. Principe (1989). Hearing the Difference: Aesthetic Value and the Compact Disc Notching Debate. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 4 (3):1-6.
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  27. Anthony Savile (2006). Imagination and Aesthetic Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (3):248-258.
    One issue for theory is to account convincingly for the value of art and the significance of its specifically aesthetic character. Appeal to imagination, understood along Kantian lines as functioning to construct ‘a second nature from the material supplied by actual nature’, generates suggestive answers to both aspects of the task. The second nature that the artist inventively constructs in fine representation is one in which themes central to the inner life are revealed in ways as unestranging to us as (...)
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  28. Elisabeth Schellekens (2007). The Aesthetic Value of Ideas. In Peter Goldie & Elisabeth Schellekens (eds.), Philosophy and Conceptual Art. Oxford University Press.
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  29. Larry Short (1991). The Aesthetic Value of Fractal Images. British Journal of Aesthetics 31 (4):342-355.
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  30. Michael A. Slote (1971). The Rationality of Aesthetic Value Judgments. Journal of Philosophy 68 (22):821-839.
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  31. Robert Stecker (2006). Aesthetic Experience and Aesthetic Value. Philosophy Compass 1 (1):1–10.
    What possesses aesthetic value? According to a broad view, it can be found almost anywhere. According to a narrower view, it is found primarily in art and is applied to other items by courtesy of sharing some of the properties that make artworks aesthetically valuable. In this paper I will defend the broad view in answering the question: how should we characterize aesthetic value and other aesthetic concepts? I will also criticize some alternative answers.
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  32. Jerome Stolnitz (1956). On Artistic Familiarity and Aesthetic Value. Journal of Philosophy 53 (8):261-276.
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  33. Thomas Thompson (1966). Hall's Analysis of Aesthetic Value. Southern Journal of Philosophy 4 (3):177-191.
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  34. M. ToMmaso, M. Sardaro & P. Livrea (2008). Aesthetic Value of Paintings Affects Pain Thresholds☆. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1152-1162.
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  35. Julie van Camp, Judging Aesthetic Value: 2 Live Crew, Pretty Woman, and the Supreme Court.
    The U.S. Supreme Court recently held that a parody by the rap group 2 Live Crew of Ray Orbison's song "Oh, Pretty Woman" was "fair use" and thus did not infringe the copyright. Although the court insisted that it was not evaluating the quality of the parody, I argue that it does in fact make several aesthetic evaluations and sometimes even seems to praise the content of the parody. I first consider the stated reasons for the claimed refusal of the (...)
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  36. Bruce Vermazen (1991). The Aesthetic Value of Originality. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 16 (1):266-279.
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  37. Ian F. Verstegen (2006). A Critical Realist Perspective on Aesthetic Value. Journal of Critical Realism 5 (2):323-343.
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  38. Dorothy Walsh (1936). The Objectivity of the Judgment of Aesthetic Value. [Lancaster, Pa.,Lancaster Press Inc.].
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  39. Kendall L. Walton (1993). How Marvelous! Toward a Theory of Aesthetic Value. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 51 (3):499-510.
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  40. Kendall L. Walton (1970). Categories of Art. Philosophical Review 79 (3):334-367.
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  41. Michael Watkins & James Shelley (2012). Response-Dependence About Aesthetic Value. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (3):338-352.
    The dominant view about the nature of aesthetic value holds it to be response-dependent. We believe that the dominance of this view owes largely to some combination of the following prevalent beliefs: 1 The belief that challenges brought against response-dependent accounts in other areas of philosophy are less challenging when applied to response-dependent accounts of aesthetic value. 2 The belief that aesthetic value is instrumental and that response-dependence about aesthetic value alone accommodates this purported fact. 3 The belief that response-dependence (...)
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  42. Arnold Wirtala (1955). Taste in the Arts: A Problem of Aesthetic Value. Educational Theory 5 (2):118-124.
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Aesthetic Criticism
  1. Gary Banham (2002). Mapplethorpe, Duchamp and the Ends of Photography. Angelaki 7 (1):119-128.
    This paper presents an argument for seeing Marcel Duchamp and Robert Mapplethorpe as opposite ends of a tradition of negotiation of art with its conditions of production. The piece takes seriously Kant's suggestions concerning the fine arts and contests views of art that see the Kantian tradition as formally fixed.
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  2. James Grant (2013). The Critical Imagination. Oxford University Press.
    The Critical Imagination is a study of metaphor, imaginativeness, and criticism of the arts. Since the eighteenth century, many philosophers have argued that appreciating art is rewarding because it involves responding imaginatively to a work. Literary works can be interpreted in many ways; architecture can be seen as stately, meditative, or forbidding; and sensitive descriptions of art are often colourful metaphors: music can 'shimmer', prose can be 'perfumed', and a painter's colouring can be 'effervescent'. Engaging with art, like creating it, (...)
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  3. James Harold (2010). The Value of Fictional Worlds (or Why 'the Lord of the Rings' is Worth Reading). Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
    Some works of fiction are widely held by critics to have little value, yet these works are not only popular but also widely admired in ways that are not always appreciated. In this paper I make use of Kendall Walton’s account of fictional worlds to argue that fictional worlds can and often do have value, including aesthetic value, that is independent of the works that create them. In the process, I critique Walton’s notion of fictional worlds and offer a defense (...)
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  4. Roger W. H. Savage (1993). Aesthetic Criticism and the Poetics of Modern Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (2):142-151.
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  5. Aaron Smuts (2014). Cinematic. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics 23 (46).
    Is cinematicity a virtue in film? Is lack of cinematicity a defect? Berys Gaut thinks so. He claims that cinematicity is a pro tanto virtue in film. I disagree. I argue that the term “cinematic” principally refers to some cluster of characteristics found in films featuring the following: expansive scenery, extreme depth of field, high camera positioning, and elaborate tracking shots. We often use the word as a term of praise. And we are likely right to do so. We are (...)
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  6. Eric Warner & Graham Goulden Hough (eds.) (1983). Strangeness and Beauty: An Anthology of Aesthetic Criticism, 1840-1910. Cambridge University Press.
    v. 1. Ruskin to Swinburne -- v. 2. Pater to Arthur Symons.
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Aesthetic Evaluation
  1. Antony Aumann (forthcoming). Aesthetic Value, Cognitive Value, and the Border Between. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    It is sometimes held that “the aesthetic” and “the cognitive” are separate categories. Enterprises concerning the former and ones concerning the latter have different aims and values. They require distinct modes of attention and reward divergent kinds of appreciation. Thus, we must avoid running together aesthetic and cognitive matters. In this paper, I challenge the independence of these categories, but in unorthodox fashion. Most attempts proceed by arguing that cognitive values can bear upon aesthetic ones. I approach from the opposite (...)
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  2. Timothy W. Bartel (1979). Appreciation and Dickie's Definition of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 19 (1):44-52.
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