This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
12 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
  1. Greg Bamford (1999). What is the Problem of Ad Hoc Hypotheses? Science and Education 8 (4):375 - 86..
    The received view of an ad hochypothesis is that it accounts for only the observation(s) it was designed to account for, and so non-ad hocness is generally held to be necessary or important for an introduced hypothesis or modification to a theory. Attempts by Popper and several others to convincingly explicate this view, however, prove to be unsuccessful or of doubtful value, and familiar and firmer criteria for evaluating the hypotheses or modified theories so classified are characteristically available. These points (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Angela Breitenbach (2013). Aesthetics in Science: A Kantian Proposal. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 113 (1pt1):83-100.
    Can aesthetic judgements legitimately be linked to the success of scientific theories? I suggest that a satisfactory answer to this question should account for the persistent attraction that aesthetic considerations seem to have for scientists, while also explaining the apparent instability of the link between the beauty of a theory and its truth. I argue that two widespread tendencies in the literature, Pythagorean and subjectivist approaches, have difficulties meeting this twofold challenge. I propose a Kantian conception of aesthetic judgements as (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. S. Chandrasekhar (1987). Truth and Beauty: Aesthetics and Motivations in Science. University of Chicago Press.
    "Sir Hermann Bondi, NatureThe late S. Chandrasekhar was best known for his discovery of the upper limit to the mass of a white dwarf star, for which he received ...
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Mark Colyvan (2002). Mathematics and Aesthetic Considerations in Science. Mind 111 (441):69-74.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. David Davies (1998). McAllister's Aesthetics in Science: A Critical Notice. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 12 (1):25 – 32.
    In Beauty and Revolution in Science, James McAllister argues that a sophisticated rationalist image of science can accommodate two prominent features of actual scientific practice, namely, appeals to “aesthetic” criteria in theory choice, and the occurrence of scientific “revolutions”. The aesthetic criteria to which scientists appeal are, he maintains, inductively grounded in the empirical record of competing theories, and scientific revolutions involve changes in aestheic criteria bu continuity in empirical criteria of theory choice. I raise difficulties for McAllister's account concerning: (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Denis Dutton & Michael Krausz (eds.) (1981). The Concept of Creativity in Science and Art. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Tibor R. Machan (1977). Kuhn, Paradigm Choice and the Arbitrariness of Aesthetic Criteria in Science. Theory and Decision 8 (4):361-362.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Elena Mamchur (1987). The Heuristic Role of Aesthetics in Science. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 1 (2):209 – 222.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ulianov Montano (2013). Beauty in Science: A New Model of the Role of Aesthetic Evaluations in Science. [REVIEW] European Journal for Philosophy of Science 3 (2):133-156.
    In Beauty and Revolution in Science, James McAllister advances a rationalistic picture of science in which scientific progress is explained in terms of aesthetic evaluations of scientific theories. Here I present a new model of aesthetic evaluations by revising McAllister’s core idea of the aesthetic induction. I point out that the aesthetic induction suffers from anomalies and theoretical inconsistencies and propose a model free from such problems. The new model is based, on the one hand, on McAllister’s original model and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jason Simus (2009). Aesthetic and Other Theoretical Virtues in Science. American Society for Aesthetics Graduate E-Journal 1 (2).
    I first provide an introduction to a neglected topic in contemporary aesthetics: intellectual beauty. I then review James McAllister’s critique of autonomism and reductionism regarding the relation between empirical and aesthetic criteria in scientific theory evaluation. Finally, I critique McAllister’s “aesthetic induction” and defend an alternative model that emphasizes the holistic coherence of aesthetic and other theoretical virtues in scientific theorizing.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Cain S. Todd (2008). Unmasking the Truth Beneath the Beauty: Why the Supposed Aesthetic Judgements Made in Science May Not Be Aesthetic at All. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):61 – 79.
    In this article I examine the status of putative aesthetic judgements in science and mathematics. I argue that if the judgements at issue are taken to be genuinely aesthetic they can be divided into two types, positing either a disjunction or connection between aesthetic and epistemic criteria in theory/proof assessment. I show that both types of claim face serious difficulties in explaining the purported role of aesthetic judgements in these areas. I claim that the best current explanation of this role, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Robert J. Valenza (2002). Aesthetic Priority in Science and Religion. Process Studies 31 (1):49-76.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation