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  1. Adil Mustafa Ahmad (1994). The Erotic and the Pornographic in Arab Culture. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (3):278-284.
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  2. Nora M. Alter & Lutz P. Koepnick (eds.) (2004). Sound Matters: Essays on the Acoustics of Modern German Culture. Berghahn Books.
    ... composed by Herms Niel as a Durchhaltefanfare, a fanfare of perseverance, for the German troops that had been surrounded on the Crimea peninsula by ...
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  3. Meter Amevans (1965). Aesthetics in Recent Japanese Novels. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (1):27-36.
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  4. Meter Amevans (1960). Aesthetic Values in the East and West. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 19 (1):3-16.
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  5. Douglas R. Anderson (1987). Creativity and the Philosophy of C.S. Peirce. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Academic Publishers.
    Chapter INTRODUCTION Charles Sanders Peirce is quickly becoming the dominant figure in the history of American philosophy. The breadth and depth of his work ...
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  6. Archie J. Bahm (1957). Buddhist Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 16 (2):249-252.
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  7. Vahan D. Barooshian (1975). The Aesthetics of the Russian Revolutionary Theatre 1917–21. British Journal of Aesthetics 15 (2):99-117.
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  8. Christopher Bartel (2004). Is Art Good for Us? Beliefs About High Culture in American Life. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):93-96.
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  9. Brian E. Butler (2003). Aesthetics and American Law. Legal Studies Forum (1):203-220.
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  10. Brian E. Butler (2003). Law as an Aesthetic Subject. ASA Newsletter 22 (3):1-3.
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  11. Horace Meyer Kallen (1943). The Arts and Thomas Jefferson. Ethics 53 (4):269-283.
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  12. José Ortega Y. Gasset (1948/1968). The Dehumanization of Art, and Other Essays on Art, Culture, and Literature. Princeton University Press.
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  13. Jonathan Salem-Wiseman (2012). Heidegger, Art, and Postmodernity by Thomson, Iain D. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (3):321-323.
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  14. Christopher Stevens (2009). Embracing Scruton's Cultural Conservatism. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):371-388.
    Despite commitments to claims about the welfare-enhancing superiority of art-interested ways of life implicit in much of their work, aestheticians have shown little interest in explicitly bringing their discipline to bear on issues at the intersection of ethics, aesthetics, and politics. Roger Scruton’s work on culture bucks that trend, but few have contributed to the discussion he initiated. After an extended treatment of one of many possible examples showing that aesthetics-related matters can and do bear significantly on social and political (...)
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  15. Fred Wilson (1989). Is Hume a Sceptic with Regard to the Senses? Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (1):49-73.
  16. Richard Wollheim (1955). Art and Marxism. Encounter 5 (5):68--71.
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Aesthetic Universals
  1. Denis Dutton (2001). Aesthetic Universals. In Berys Nigel Gaut & Dominic Lopes (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Aesthetics. Routledge. 203--214.
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  2. Gene Fendt (1997). The Others In/Of Aristotle's Poetics. Journal of Philosophical Research 22:245-260.
    This paper aims at interpreting (primarily) the first six chapters of Aristotle’s Poetics in a way that dissolves many of the scholarly arguments conceming them. It shows that Aristotle frequently identifies the object of his inquiry by opposing it to what is other than it (in several different ways). As a result aporiai arise where there is only supposed to be illuminating exclusion of one sort or another. Two exemplary cases of this in chapters 1-6 are Aristotle’s account of mimesis (...)
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  3. Mohan Matthen (forthcoming). Play, Skill, and the Origins of Perceptual Art. British Journal of Aesthetics.
    Art is universal across cultures. Yet, it is biologically expensive because of the energy expended and reduced vigilance. Why do humans make and contemplate it? This paper advances a thesis about the psychological origins of perceptual art. First, it delineates the aspects of art that need explaining: not just why it is attractive, but why fine execution and form—which have to do with how the attraction is achieved—matter over and above attractiveness. Second, it states certain constraints: we need to explain (...)
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  4. Tadashi Ogawa & Barry Smith (1995). Editorial Preface. The Monist 78 (1):3-4.
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Crosscultural Aesthetics
  1. Christine James (2008). Philosophy of Disability. Essays in Philosophy 9 (1):1-10.
    Disability has been a topic of heightened philosophical interest in the last 30 years. Disability theory has enriched a broad range of sub-specializations in philosophy. The call for papers for this issue welcomed papers addressing questions on normalcy, medical ethics, public health, philosophy of education, aesthetics, philosophy of sport, philosophy of religion, and theories of knowledge. This issue of Essays in Philosophy includes nine essays that approach the philosophy of disability in three distinct ways: The first set of three essays (...)
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  2. Dominic McIver Lopes & Andrea Naomi Walsh (2009). Objects of Appropriation. In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley.
  3. John Marmysz (2002). War, Occupation, and Creativity. [REVIEW] Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 3 (2).
    A review of War, Occupation, and Creativity: Japan and East Asia 1920-1960, edited by Marlene Mayo and Thomas Rimer, with H. Eleanor Kerkham.
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  4. Mara Miller (2008). Japanese Gardens as Texts and Contexts. East-West Connections 7 (1):85-106.
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  5. Mara Miller & Koji Yamasaki (forthcoming). Ainu Aesthetics. In Minh Nguyen (ed.), New Studies in Japanese Aesthetics. Lexington Books.
    Ainu artists were invited to make “replicas” of traditional Ainu arts held in an important museum collection and describe their choices, process and results. The resulting Ainu aesthetics challenges—and changes—our understanding of aesthetics and the philosophy of art, on four levels: descriptive aesthetics, categorical aesthetics (the categories through which the Ainu understand aesthetic value), implications of these aesthetics for a variety of human activities such as museum practice and daily life, and the implications of the first three for our broader (...)
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  6. Eric S. Nelson (2013). Generativities: Western Philosophy, Chinese Painting, and the Yijing. Orbis Idearum 1 (1):97–104.
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  7. Martina Sauer (2014-08-11). Aesthetik und Pragmatismus. Zur funktionalen Relevanz einer nicht-diskursiven Formauffassung bei Cassirer, Langer und Krois. Image. Zeitschrift für Interdisziplinäre Bildwissenschaft 20 (2):49-69.
    Aesthetics and pragmatism: are they compatible? It is apparent that as followers of Ernst Cassirer both Susanne K. Langer and John M. Krois adopted this concept. Their approach is based on a non-discursive understanding of form and its functional relevance. How this affects the definition of aesthetics and opens it for action relevant aspects in accordance with formal aesthetics is subject of this research. -/- Lassen sich Aesthetik und Pragmatismus miteinander vereinbaren? Sowohl Susanne K. Langer als auch John M. Krois (...)
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  8. Martina Sauer (2013-4-15). John Michael Krois. Bildkörper und Körperschema. Schriften zur Verkörperungstheorie ikonischer Formen. [REVIEW] Sehepunkte. Rezensionsjournal für Geschichtswissenschaften 13 (4).
  9. Martina Sauer (2013). Verantwortung - Vom Aufladen Mit Bedeutung in Kunst Und Sprache. Zu den Konsequenzen Aus den Kulturanthropologischen Ansätzen von Cassirer, Warburg Und Böhme. In Oxen, Kathrin und Sagert, Dietrich (Hrsg.): Mitteilungen - zur Erneuerung evangelischer Predigtkultur, Leipzig 2013 (Kirche im Aufbruch ; 5). 15-33.
    So many things have a meaning for us. How is it possible and how can we deal with it? In "gestures of attention" (rituals) we understand it, Hartmut Böhme says, and we produce it ourselves, Aby M. Warburg and Ernst Cassirer are suggesting. That means the producer and the recipient are responsible for their doing. -/- So vieles in unserem Leben hat für uns eine Bedeutung. Wie kommt das und wie können wir damit umgehen? In "Gesten der Zuwendung" (Rituale), so (...)
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Pop Culture
  1. Andrew Aberdein (2008). The Companions and Socrates: Is Inara a Hetaera? In Rhonda V. Wilcox & Tanya Cochran (eds.), Investigating Firefly and Serenity: Science Fiction on the Frontier. I. B. Tauris. 63-75.
  2. Andrew Aberdein (2003). Balderdash and Chicanery: Science and Beyond. In James South (ed.), Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnydale. Open Court. 79-90.
    The status and limits of science are the focus of urgent public debate. This paper contributes a philosophical analysis of representations of science and the supernatural in popular culture. It explores and critiques a threefold taxonomy of supernatural narratives: (1) reduction of the supernatural to contemporary science; (2) reduction to a `future science' methodologically continuous with contemporary science; (3) the supernatural as irreducible. The means by which the TV series Buffy the Vampire Slayer adroitly negotiates the borderlines between these narratives (...)
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  3. Richard Eldridge (2002). Romance and Politics/Romance and Folly: Thomas E. Wartenberg's Unlikely Couples. Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (2):322–329.
  4. C. E. Emmer (2007). The Flower and the Breaking Wheel: Burkean Beauty and Political Kitsch. International Journal of the Arts in Society 2 (1):153-164.
    What is kitsch? The varieties of phenomena which can fall under the name are bewildering. Here, I focus on what has been called “traditional kitsch,” and argue that it often turns on the emotional effect specifically captured by Edmund Burke’s concept of “beauty” from his 1757 'A Philosophical Enquiry into the Sublime and Beautiful.' Burkean beauty also serves to distinguish “traditional kitsch” from other phenomena also often called “kitsch”—namely, entertainment. Although I argue that Burkean beauty in domestic decoration allows for (...)
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  5. C. E. Emmer (1998). Kitsch Against Modernity. Art Criticism 13 (1):53-80.
    "The writer discusses the concept of kitsch. Having reviewed a variety of approaches to kitsch, he posits an historical conception of it, connecting it to modernity and defining it as a coping-mechanism for modernity. He thus suggests that kitsch is best understood as a tool in the struggle against the particular stresses of the modern world and that it uses materials at hand, fashioning from them some sort of stability largely through projecting images of nature, stasis, and continuity. He discusses (...)
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  6. Christine James (2010). The Common Vernacular of Power Relations in Heavy Metal and Christian Fundamentalist Performances. In Rosemary Hill Karl Spracklen (ed.), Heavy Fundametalisms: Music, Metal and Politics. Inter-Disciplinary Press.
    Wittgenstein’s comment that what can be shown cannot be said has a special resonance with visual representations of power in both Heavy Metal and Fundamentalist Christian communities. Performances at metal shows, and performances of ‘religious theatre’, share an emphasis on violence and destruction. For example, groups like GWAR and Cannibal Corpse feature violent scenes in stage shows and album covers, scenes that depict gory results of unrestrained sexuality that are strikingly like Halloween ‘Hell House’ show presented by neo-Conservative, Fundamentalist Christian (...)
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  7. Christine James (2005). The Benefits of Comedy: Teaching Ethics Through Shared Laughter. Academic Exchange Extra (April).
    Over the last three years I have been fortunate to teach an unusual class, one that provides an academic background in ethical and social and political theory using the medium of comedy. I have taught the class at two schools, a private liberal arts college in western Pennsylvania and a public regional state university in southern Georgia. While the schools vary widely in a number of ways, there are characteristics that the students share: the school in Pennsylvania had a large (...)
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  8. John Marmysz (2012). Rooting for the Fascists in James Cameron's Avatar. Film and Philosophy 16.
    Conservative critics have united in attacking James Cameron’s newest blockbuster Avatar for its “liberal” political message. But underneath all of the manifest liberalism of Avatar there is also a latent message. In his valorization of the organic, primal, interconnectedness of Na’vi culture and his denigration of the mechanical, modern, disconnectedness of human culture, Cameron runs very close to advocating a form of fascism. -/- In this paper I describe the overarching philosophical perspective of fascism, and then I draw on the (...)
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  9. John Marmysz (2003). Laughing at Nothing: Humor as a Response to Nihilism. SUNY Press.
    Disputing the common misconception that nihilism is wholly negative and necessarily damaging to the human spirit, John Marmysz offers a clear and complete definition to argue that it is compatible, and indeed preferably responded to, with an attitude of good humor. He carefully scrutinizes the phenomenon of nihilism as it appears in the works, lives, and actions of key figures in the history of philosophy, literature, politics, and theology, including Nietzsche, Heidegger, Camus, and Mishima. While suggesting that there ultimately is (...)
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  10. John Marmysz (2002). War, Occupation, and Creativity. [REVIEW] Consciousness, Literature and the Arts 3 (2).
    A review of War, Occupation, and Creativity: Japan and East Asia 1920-1960, edited by Marlene Mayo and Thomas Rimer, with H. Eleanor Kerkham.
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  11. John Marmysz (1996). From Night to Day: Nihilism and the Living Dead. Film and Philosophy 3:138-143.
    Upon its release in 1968, George Romero's Night of the Living Dead was attacked by many critics as an exploitative low budget film of questionable moral value. I argue in this paper that Night of the Living Dead is indeed nihilistic, but in a deeper philosophical sense than the critics had in mind.
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  12. Brian Ribeiro (2008). A Distance Theory of Humour. Think 6 (17/18):139-148.
    This paper develops a programmatic 'theory sketch' of a new theory of humour, pitched at roughly the same level of detail, and intended to have roughly the same level of inclusiveness, as the other available philosophical "theories" of humour. I will call the theory I propose the distance theory. After an appeal to some intuitive illustrations of the distance theory's attractions, I move on to offer an analysis of observational comedy using the distance theory. I conclude the paper with some (...)
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  13. Stephen Snyder (2010). Arthur Danto’s Andy Warhol: The Embodiment of Theory in Art and the Pragmatic Turn. Leitmotiv:135-151.
    Arthur Danto’s recent book, Andy Warhol, leads the reader through the story of the iconic American’s artistic life highlighted by a philosophical commentary, a commentary that merges Danto’s aesthetic theory with the artist himself. Inspired by Warhol’s Brillo Box installation, art that in Danto’s eyes was indiscernible from the everyday boxes it represented, Danto developed a theory that is able to differentiate art from non-art by employing the body of conceptual art theory manifest in what he termed the ‘artworld’. The (...)
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Aesthetics and Culture, Misc
  1. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen & Göran Hermerén (eds.) (1980). Contemporary Aesthetics in Scandinavia. Doxa.
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  2. Derek Allan (2104). André Malraux. In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. 2nd edition (Oxford University Press). 239-243 (Vol 4).
    An overview of Malraux's theory of art, with sub-headings: "Basic Principles","The Creative Process","The Emergence of 'Art'","Art and Time", "The Modern Universal World of Art", and "Critical Responses". Includes a brief discussion of the musée imaginaire.
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  3. Martijn Boven (2008). Wat vastgelegd is, misleidt ons: de Cahiers van Paul Valéry. Deus Ex Machina 127:5-6.
    Paul Valéry is de dichter die zwijgt; de denker die weigert filosoof te zijn; de schrijver die de taal in staat van beschuldiging stelt; de expert die volhoudt een amateur te zijn; de mysticus die zijn heil zoekt bij de wiskunde; de stamelaar die aan een kwaal van precisie lijdt; de Narcissus die misschien toch liever Orpheus had willen zijn. Hij is de chroniqueur van het denken en de meester van de tegenspraak. Ik probeer me hem voor te stellen. Het (...)
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  4. Stephen Davies (2007). Balinese Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):21–29.
    According to the Balinese expert, Dr. Anak Agung Mad ´e Djelantik, “no writings about aesthetics specifically as a discipline exist in Bali.”1 The arts are discussed in ancient palm leaf texts, but mainly in connection with religion, spirituality, ceremony, and the like. However, there are famous accounts by expatriate Westerners and anthropologists.2 There have also been collaborations between Balinese and Western scholars.3 In addition, there is a significant literature written in Indonesian by Balinese experts, beginning in the 1970s.4 Considerable experience (...)
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  5. Corey W. Dyck (2004). Spirit Without Lines: Kant's Attempt to Reconcile the Genius with Society. Idealistic Studies 34 (2):151-62.
    In the Anthropology, Kant wonders whether the genius or the individual possessing perfected judgment has contributed more to the advance of culture. In the KU, Kant answers this question definitively on the side of those with perfected judgment. Nevertheless, occurring as it does in §50 of the KU, immediately after Kant’s celebration of the genius in §49, this only raises more questions. Kant rejects the genius in favour of the individual of taste as an advancer of culture, yet under what (...)
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  6. Eran Guter (2011). A Surrogate for the Soul: Wittgenstein and Schoenberg. In Enzo De Pellegrin (ed.), Interactive Wittgenstein. Springer. 109--152.
    This article challenges a widespread assumption, arguing that Wittgenstein and the Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg had little in common beyond their shared cultural heritage, overlapping social circles in fin-de-ciecle Vienna. The article explores Wittgenstein's aesthetic inclinations and the intellectual and philosophical influences that may have reinforced them. The article culminates in an attempt to form a Wittgensteinian response to Schoenberg's dodecaphonic language and to answer the question as to why Wittgenstein and Schoenberg arrived at very different ideas about contemporary music (...)
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  7. Dominic McIver Lopes & Andrea Naomi Walsh (2009). Objects of Appropriation. In James O. Young & Conrad Brunk (eds.), The Ethics of Cultural Appropriation. Wiley.
  8. Hans Maes (2011). Drawing the Line: Art Versus Pornography. Philosophy Compass 6 (6):385-397.
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