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  1. Lars-Olof Åhlberg (1994). Susanne Langer on Representation and Emotion in Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 34 (1):69-80.
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  2. R. T. Allen (1990). The Arousal and Expression of Emotion by Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (1):57-61.
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  3. Charles Altieri (2003). The Particulars of Rapture: An Aesthetics of the Affects. Cornell University Press.
    " "The Particulars of Rapture proposes treating affects in adverbial rather than in adjectival terms, emphasizing the way in which text and paintings shape ...
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  4. Meter Amevans (1947). Expression and Aesthetic Expression. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 6 (2):172-179.
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  5. Meter Amevans (1944). Art as Expression. Ethics 54 (4):283-289.
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  6. Douglas R. Anderson & Carl R. Hausman (1992). The Role of Aesthetic Emotion in R. G. Collingwood's Conception of Creative Activity. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (4):299-305.
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  7. Gabriel Apata (2001). Feeling and Emotion in Bosanquet's Aesthetics. Bradley Studies 7 (2):177-196.
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  8. Leo Apostel, Herman Sabbe & Fernand J. Vandamme (eds.) (1986). Reason, Emotion, and Music: Towards a Common Structure for Arts, Sciences, and Philosophies, Based on a Conceptual Framework for the Description of Music. Communication & Cognition.
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  9. Antony Aumann (2014). Emotion, Cognition, and the Value of Literature: The Case of Nietzsche's Genealogy. Journal of Nietzsche Studies 45 (2):182-195.
    Near the end of the Republic, Plato challenges defenders of poetry to explain how it “not only gives pleasure but is beneficial . . . to human life.”1 We sometimes hear a heightened version of this demand. Partisans not just of poetry but also of literature in general are asked to establish that the arts they celebrate possess a distinctive or unique value. In other words, they must show that poetry and literature are irreplaceable and that we would lose some (...)
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  10. Bernard Baars (2008). Velasquez and the Postmodern Circle of Mirrors. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (9):35-39.
    I agree with Uzi Awret that Diego Velasquez's seminal painting, Las Meninas, is an expression of self-consciousness in many different ways. But my first response was to the feeling tone Velasquez evokes in his work, which felt dark and rather grim to me. I think this painting may be a meditation on the mortification of the flesh, a theme that was surely familiar to Velasquez. It is a contemplation of human vanity. Self-consciousness is not just a cognitive act. The so-called (...)
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  11. Albert Balz (1914). Music and Emotion. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 11 (9):236-244.
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  12. Katerina Bantinaki (2012). The Paradox of Horror: Fear as a Positive Emotion. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (4):2012.
  13. S. Bartlett (2000). Review of “Strange Fits of Passion: Epistemologies of Emotion, Hume to Austen” by Adela Pinch. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Emotion 1 (1):187-191.
  14. Anne Bartsch (2010). Vivid Abstractions: On the Role of Emotion Metaphors in Film Viewers' Search for Deeper Insight and Meaning. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 34 (1):240-260.
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  15. Ismay Barwell (1986). How Does Art Express Emotion? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 45 (2):175-181.
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  16. Arthur Berndtson (1960). Beauty, Embodiment, and Art. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 21 (1):50-61.
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  17. Matthew A. Bezdek & Richard J. Gerrig (2008). Musical Emotions in the Context of Narrative Film. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):578-578.
    Juslin & Vll's (J&V's) discussions of evaluative conditioning and episodic memory focus on circumstances in which music becomes associated with arbitrary life events. However, analyses of film music suggest that viewers experience consistent pairings between types of music and types of narrative content. Researchers have demonstrated that the emotional content of film music has a major impact on viewers' emotional experiences of a narrative.
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  18. Jamshed J. Bharucha & Meagan Curtis (2008). Affective Spectra, Synchronization, and Motion: Aspects of the Emotional Response to Music. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):579-579.
    We propose three extensions of the theory developed by Juslin & Vll (J&V). First, motion should be considered as an additional mechanism. Second, synchronization plays a role in eliciting emotion. And, third, the spectrum of musical affect or feelings is denser and broader than the spectrum of emotions, suggesting an expansion of the scope of the theory beyond emotions.
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  19. Jeanette Bicknell (2009). Why Music Moves Us. Palgrave Macmillan.
    The tears of Odysseus -- History : music gives voice to the ineffable -- Tears, chills, and broken bones -- The music itself -- Explaining strong emotional responses to music I -- Explaining strong emotional responses to music II -- The sublime, revisited -- Conclusion : values.
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  20. Paul Boghossian (2007). Explaining Musical Experience. In Kathleen Stock (ed.), Philosophers on Music: Experience, Meaning, and Work. Oxford University Press.
    1. I start with the observation that we often respond to a musical performance with emotion -- even if it is just the performance of a piece of absolute music, unaccompanied by text, title or programme. We can be exhilarated after a Rossini overture brought off with subtlety and panache; somber and melancholy after Furtlanger’s performance of the slow movement of the Eroica. And so forth. These emotions feel like the real thing to me – or anyway very close to (...)
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  21. Bijoy H. Boruah (1988). Fiction and Emotion: A Study in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Mind. Oxford University Press.
    Why do people respond emotionally to works of fiction they know are make-believe? Boruah tackles this question, which is fundamental aesthetics and literary studies, from a totally new perspective. Bringing together the various answers that have been offered by philosophers from Aristotle to Roger Scruton, he shows that while some philosophers have denied any rational basis to our emotional responses to fiction, others have argued that the emotions evoked by fiction are not real emotions at all. In response to this, (...)
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  22. Bernard Bosanquet (1894). On the Nature of Æsthetic Emotion. Mind 3 (10):153-166.
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  23. Guy Bouchard (1977). Art and Human Emotions. Par Egon Weiner. Springfield, Charles C. Thomas, 1975. 90 P. Dialogue 16 (04):754-755.
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  24. Emily Brady & Arto Haapala (2003). Melancholy as an Aesthetic Emotion. Contemporary Aesthetics 1.
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  25. M. Brady (2011). The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):226-228.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  26. C. D. Broad (1971). Emotion and Sentiment. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 13 (2):203-214.
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  27. Stuart Brock (2007). Fictions, Feelings, and Emotions. Philosophical Studies 132 (2):211 - 242.
    Many philosophers suggest (1) that our emotional engagement with fiction involves participation in a game of make-believe, and (2) that what distinguishes an emotional game from a dispassionate game is the fact that the former activity alone involves sensations of physiological and visceral disturbances caused by our participation in the game. In this paper I argue that philosophers who accept (1) should reject (2). I then illustrate how this conclusion illuminates various puzzles in aesthetics and the philosophy of mind.
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  28. Brian Bruya, Aesthetic Spontaneity: A Theory of Action Based on Affective Responsiveness.
  29. Malcolm Budd (2008). Aesthetic Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Aesthetic judgements, aesthetic principles, and aesthetic properties -- Aesthetic essence -- The acquaintance principle -- The intersubjective validity of aesthetic judgements -- The pure judgement of taste as an aesthetic reflective judgement -- Understanding music -- The characterization of aesthetic qualities by essential metaphors and quasi-metaphors -- Musical movement and aesthetic metaphors -- Aesthetic realism and emotional qualities of music -- On looking at a picture -- The look of a picture -- Wollheim on correspondence, projective properties, and (...)
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  30. Malcolm Budd (2005). Aesthetic Realism and Emotional Qualities of Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):111-122.
    Roger Scruton appears to have been the first to argue for and articulate an anti-realist theory of aesthetic properties. In the case of emotional qualities of music, his principal argument against realism is unsound and cannot, I believe, be repaired. Nevertheless an anti-realist view of emotional qualities of music is in my view correct and I defend Scruton's insight against a rival realist conception. However, I prefer a rather different form of anti-realism to Scruton's.
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  31. Malcolm Budd (1989). Music and the Communication of Emotion. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (2):129-138.
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  32. Malcolm Budd (1987). Motion and Emotion in Music: A Reply. British Journal of Aesthetics 27 (1):51-54.
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  33. Malcolm Budd (1985). Music and the Emotions: The Philosophical Theories. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    The most fundamental debate in the philosophy of music involves the question of whether there is an artistically important connection between music and the ...
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  34. Malcolm Budd (1983). Motion and Emotion in Music: How Music Sounds. British Journal of Aesthetics 23 (3):209-221.
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  35. Malcolm Budd (1980). The Repudiation of Emotion: Hanslick on Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 20 (1):29-43.
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  36. Steven Burns & Alice MacLachlan (2004). Getting It: On Jokes and Art. AE: Journal of the Canadian Society of Aesthetics 10.
    “What is appreciation?” is a basic question in the philosophy of art, and the analogy between appreciating a work of art and getting a joke can help us answer it. We first propose a subjective account of aesthetic appreciation (I). Then we consider jokes (II). The difference between getting a joke and not, or what it is to get it right, can often be objectively articulated. Such explanations cannot substitute for the joke itself, and indeed may undermine the very power (...)
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  37. David Carr (2004). Music, Meaning, and Emotion. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 62 (3):225–234.
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  38. John Casey (1984). Emotion and Imagination. Philosophical Quarterly 34 (134):1-14.
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  39. V. K. Chari (1976). Poetic Emotions and Poetic Semantics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 34 (3):287-299.
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  40. Jinhee Choi (2003). All the Right Responses: Fiction Films and Warranted Emotions. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (3):308-321.
    Cognitive theories of emotions have provided us with explanations of how we emotionally engage with fiction, when we are aware that what is depicted is fictional. However, these theories left an important question unanswered: namely, what kinds of emotional responses to fiction are warranted responses. The main focus of this paper is how our emotional responses to fiction can be aesthetically warranted—that is, how emotions directed to fiction can be warranted given the fact that its object is an artwork. I (...)
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  41. Tom Cochrane (2012). The Emotional Experience of the Sublime. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 42 (2):125-148.
    The literature on the venerable aesthetic category of the sublime often provides us with lists of sublime phenomena — mountains, storms, deserts, volcanoes, oceans, the starry sky, and so on. But it has long been recognized that what matters is the experience of such objects. We then find that one of the most consistent claims about this experience is that it involves an element of fear. Meanwhile, the recognition of the sublime as a category of aesthetic appreciation implies that attraction, (...)
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  42. Tom Cochrane (2010). Music, Emotions and the Influence of the Cognitive Sciences. Philosophy Compass 5 (11):978-988.
    This article reviews some of the ways in which philosophical problems concerning music can be informed by approaches from the cognitive sciences (principally psychology and neuroscience). Focusing on the issues of musical expressiveness and the arousal of emotions by music, the key philosophical problems and their alternative solutions are outlined. There is room for optimism that while current experimental data does not always unambiguously satisfy philosophical scrutiny, it can potentially support one theory over another, and in some cases allow us (...)
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  43. Tom Cochrane (2010). A Simulation Theory of Musical Expressivity. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (2):191-207.
    This paper examines the causal basis of our ability to attribute emotions to music, developing and synthesizing the existing arousal, resemblance and persona theories of musical expressivity to do so. The principal claim is that music hijacks the simulation mechanism of the brain, a mechanism which has evolved to detect one's own and other people's emotions.
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  44. Tom Cochrane (2008). Expression and Extended Cognition. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):59-73.
    I argue for the possibility of an extremely intimate connection between the emotional content of the music and the emotional state of the person who produces that music. Under certain specified conditions, the music may not just influence, but also partially constitute the musician’s emotional state.
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  45. Filippo Contesi (2012). Savoring Disgust: The Foul and the Fair in Aesthetics. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (1):113-116.
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  46. Deryck Cooke (1959/1990). The Language of Music. Oxford University Press.
    First published in 1959, this original study argues that the main characteristic of music is that it expresses and evokes emotion, and that all composers whose music has a tonal basis have used the same, or closely similar, melodic phrases, harmonies, and rhythms to affect the listener in the same ways. He supports this view with hundreds of musical examples, ranging from plainsong to Stravinsky, and contends that music is a language in the specific sense that we can identify idioms (...)
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  47. Herbert Ellsworth Cory (1928). The Concept of Expression in Esthetic Theory. I. Journal of Philosophy 25 (2):40-53.
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  48. Herbert Ellsworth Cory (1928). The Concept of Expression in Esthetic Theory. II. Journal of Philosophy 25 (3):57-71.
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  49. Timothy M. Costelloe (2010). Mirrors to One Another: Emotion and Value in Jane Austen and David Hume by Dadlez, E. M. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (2):179-181.
  50. S. G. Couvalis (1988). Feyerabend, Ionesco, and the Philosophy of the Drama. Critical Philosophy 4:51-66.
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