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  1. Douglas Anderson (1986). Review of Eva Schaper, Pleasure, Preference and Value. [REVIEW] Idealistic Studies 16 (2):186-187.
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  2. Hanne Appelqvist (2011). On Music, Wine, and the Criteria of Understanding. SATS 12 (1):18-35.
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  3. Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). The Limits of Photography. International Journal of Philosophical Studies.
    This paper is about what counts as a photograph and what does not. One way in which this question arises stems from new technologies that keep changing our way of producing photographs, such as digital photography, which not only has now widely replaced traditional film photography but also challenges the very limits of what we count as a photograph. I shall discuss below at some length different aspects of digital photography, but also want to focus here on a striking new (...)
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  4. Robert Greenleaf Brice (2014). Exploring Certainty: Wittgenstein and Wide Fields of Thought. Lexington Books.
  5. Elisa Caldarola, Davide Quattrocchi & Gabriele Tomasi (eds.) (2013). Wittgenstein, l'estetica e le arti. Carocci.
    In his writings Wittgenstein has touched some key aspects of aesthetic experience, of the experience of art, and of the dynamics of culture. Moreover, several lines of research in these fields have emerged and are still emerging from the roots of Wittgenstein's thought. This volume collects a number of essays on these topics by renowned international scholars (such as H.-J. Glock, J. Hyman, S. Majetschak, J. Schulte, A. Voltolini, and W. Vossenkuhl) and younger researchers. Our aim is to document the (...)
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  6. Clive Cazeaux (2011). Living Metaphor. Studi Filosofici 34 (1):291-308.
    The concept of ‘living metaphor’ receives a number of articulations within metaphor theory. A review of four key theories – Nietzsche, Ricoeur, Lakoff and Johnson, and Derrida – reveals a distinction between theories which identify a prior, speculative nature working on or with metaphor, and theories wherein metaphor is shown to be performatively always, already active in thought. The two cannot be left as alternatives because they exhibit opposing theses with regard to the ontology of metaphor, but neither can an (...)
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  7. Angela Curran (2012). Aristotle. In Alessandro Giovannelli (ed.), Aesthetics: The Key Thinkers. 21-33.
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  8. Robert M. Ellis (2013). Middle Way Philosophy 3: The Integration of Meaning. Lulu.
    This third volume of the Middle Way Philosophy series applies the revolutionary view, taken from cognitive science, that meaning is found in our bodies rather than in a relationship between language and reality. Cognitive and emotive meaning cannot be separated. This approach reveals the basic error of the metaphysical views that depend on absolute cognitive meaning. It also provides the basis for an account of how we can integrate meaning. Each new time we connect an experience to a symbol we (...)
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  9. C. E. Emmer (2013). 9/11 as Schmaltz-Attractor: A Coda on the Significance of Kitsch. In Monica Kjellman-Chapin (ed.), Kitsch: History, Theory, Practice. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    "The concluding chapter, penned by C. E. Emmer, both revisits and greatly expands upon disputations within the contested territory of kitsch as term and tool in cultural turf-war arsenals. Focusing on debates surrounding two visual responses to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Dennis Madalone's 2003 music video for the patriotic anthem 'America We Stand As One' and Jenny Ryan's 'plushie' sculpture, 'Soft 9/11,' Emmer utilizes these debates to reveal the coexisting and competing attitudes towards ostensibly kitschy objects and (...)
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  10. Hector Ferreiro (2011). El Lenguaje Como Elemento Inmanente Del Pensar y la Tesis Hegeliana de la Muerte Del Arte. Kalíope 7 (14):108-122.
    The main claim of Hegel´s System is that in its inner structure reality is consubstantial with subjective reason, so that, in spite of all its eventual contradictions, reality can be understood by the human mind. However, the process of knowledge of the rationality of reality is at the same time the process of self-knowledge of the rationality that defines as such the human mind. In this general process of knowledge-self-knowledge, the different artistic forms and the different periods of the History (...)
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  11. Joseph S. Fulda (1993). Computer-Generated Art, Music, and Literature: Philosophical Conundrums. SIGART Bulletin 4 (1):6-7.
    Considers the question of the authorship of the works in the title from a /philosophical/, as opposed to legal, standpoint, using the sense-reference dichotomy, intension-extension dichotomy, and procedural knowledge-declarative knowledge dichotomy. Reaches no conclusion.
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  12. Jonathan Gilmore (2013). Normative and Scientific Approaches to the Understanding and Evaluation of Art. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (02):144-145.
    The psycho-historical framework proposes that appreciators' responses to art vary as a function of their sensitivity to its historical dimensions. However, the explanatory power of that framework is limited insofar as it assimilates relevantly different kinds of appreciation and insofar as it eschews a normative account of when a response succeeds in qualifying as an appreciation of art qua art.
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  13. Athanasia Glycofrydi-Leontsini (1996). The Classic and the Romantic in Neohellenic Aesthetics. Annals of Aesthetics 36:191-210.
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  14. Geert Gooskens (2011). Beyond Good and Evil? Morality in Video Games. Philosophical Writings (1):37-44.
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  15. Geert Gooskens (2010). Where Am I? The Problem of Bilocation in Virtual Environments. Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 7 (3):13-24.
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  16. Eran Guter (2010). Ornamentality in the New Media. In Anat Biletzki (ed.), Hues of Philosophy: Essays in Memory of Ruth Manor. College Publications.
    Ornamentality is pervasive in the new media and it is related to their essential characteristics: dispersal, hypertextuality, interactivity, digitality and virtuality. I utilize Kendall Walton's theory of ornamentality in order to construe a puzzle pertaining to the new media. the ornamental erosion of information. I argue that insofar as we use the new media as conduits of real life, the excessive density of ornamental devices which is prevalent in certain new media environments, forces us to conduct our inquiries under conditions (...)
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  17. Eran Guter (2009). Schoenberg and Wittgenstein: The Odd Couple. In V. M. Muntz, K. Puhl & J. Wang (eds.), Language and World, Contributions to the 32nd International Wittgenstein Symposium.
    This paper is an elaborate response to Stanely Cavell's suggestion that Schoenberg's idea of the 12-tone row is a serviceable image of Wittgenstein's idea of grammar. I argue that this suggestion underplays what must be a major premise in any argument for yoking Wittgenstein and Schoenberg: Wittgenstein's philosophically entrenched rejection of modern music. I consider this omission in the context of Wittgenstein's idiosyncratic emulation of Schenker's theory of music in order to facilitate a direct comparison between Wittgenstein's and Schoenberg's sharply (...)
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  18. Allan Hazlett & Christy Mag Uidhir (2011). Unrealistic Fictions. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (1):33--46.
    In this paper, we develop an analysis of unrealistic fiction that captures the everyday sense of ‘unrealistic’. On our view, unrealistic fictions are a species of inconsistent fictions, but fictions for which such inconsistency, given the supporting role we claim played by genre, needn’t be a critical defect. We first consider and reject an analysis of unrealistic fiction as fiction that depicts or describes unlikely events; we then develop our own account and make an initial statement of it: unrealistic fictions (...)
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  19. Robin James (2009). In but Not of, of but Not In: On Taste, Hipness, and White Embodiment. Contemporary Aesthetics 2 (Aesthetics and Race).
    The status of the body figures paradoxically in the interrelated discourses of whiteness, aesthetic taste, and hipness. While Richard Dyer’s analysis of whiteness argues that white identity is “in but not of the body,” Carolyn Korsmeyer’s and Julia Kristeva’s feminist analyses of aesthetic “taste” demonstrate that this faculty is traditionally conceived as something “of” but not “in” the body. While taste directly distances whiteness from embodiment, hipness negatively affirms this same distance: the hipster proves his elite status within white culture (...)
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  20. Galen A. Johnson (2009). The Retrieval of the Beautiful: Thinking Through Merleau-Ponty's Aesthetics. Northwestern University Press.
    Through the framework of Merleau-Ponty's aesthetics, the author explores fundamental themes of the retrieval of the beautiful--desire, repetition, difference, rhythm and the sublime--drawing also from the works of Paul Czanne, August Rodin ...
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  21. Vasso Kindi (2010). Novelty and Revolution in Art and Science: The Connection Between Kuhn and Cavell. Perspectives on Science 18 (3):284-310.
    Both Kuhn and Cavell acknowledge their indebtedness to each other in their respective books of the 60s. Cavell in (Must We Mean What We Say (1969)) and Kuhn in (The Structure of Scientific Revolutions 1962). They were together at Berkeley where they had both moved in 1956 as assistant professors after their first encounter at the Society of Fellows at Harvard (Kuhn 2000d, p. 197). In Berkeley, Cavell and Kuhn discovered a mutual understanding and an intellectual affinity. They had regular (...)
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  22. Hallvard Lillehammer (2008). Values of Art and the Ethical Question. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (4):376-394.
    Does the ethical value of a work of art ever contribute to its aesthetic value? I argue that when conventionally interpreted as a request for a conceptual analysis the answer to this question is indeterminate. I then propose a different interpretation of the question on which it is understood as a substantial and normative question internal to the practice of aesthetic criticism.
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  23. Hans Maes (2011). Drawing the Line: Art Versus Pornography. Philosophy Compass 6 (6):385-397.
  24. Hans Maes (2007). Een treffende gelijkenis. Over grappen en kunst. Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 99 (4):281-296.
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  25. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). The Epistemic Misuse & Abuse of Pictorial Caricature. American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (2):137-152.
    I claim that caricature is an epistemically defective depiction. More precisely, when employed in service to some epistemic uptake, I claim that caricature can have a non-negligible epistemic effect only for a less than ideally rational audience with certain cognitive biases. An ideally rational audience, however, would take all caricature to be what I refer to as fairground caricature, i.e., an interesting or entertaining form of depiction that is at best only trivially revelatory. I then argue that any medium (or (...)
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  26. Evangelos Moutsopoulos (2002). Motions of Sounds, Bodies, and Souls [Plato, Laws VII. 790e Ff.]. Prolegomena 1 (2):113-119.
    This article explores how Plato, in his “metaphysical” dialogues, sees the specific properties of motion (and especially of motion in music), which lend themselves to adaptation for the purposes of maintaining or restoring the health of the soul. Plato explores the property of regular or rhythmic motion in particular. The attention has been drawn to the analogy between the calming effect of music, at the human level, and the Demiurge’s achievement in willing the world into existence. The focus of the (...)
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  27. Daniéle Moyal-Sharrock (2009). The Fiction of Paradox: Really Feeling for Anna Karenina. In Ylva Gustafsson, Camilla Kronqvist & Michael McEachrane (eds.), Emotions and Understanding: Wittgensteinian Perspectives. Palgrave Macmillan.
    How is it that we can be moved by what we know does not exist? In this paper, I examine the so-called 'paradox of fiction', showing that it fatally hinges on cognitive theories of emotion such as Kendall Walton's pretend theory and Peter Lamarque's thought theory. I reject these theories and acknowledge the concept-formative role of genuine emotion generated by fiction. I then argue, contra Jenefer Robinson, that this 'éducation sentimentale' is not achieved through distancing, but rather through the engagement (...)
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  28. Olaf L. Müller (2009). Colour Spectral Counterpoints. Case Study on Aestetic Judgement in the Experimental Sciences. In Ingo Nussbaumer & Galerie Hubert Winter (eds.), Restraint versus Intervention: Painting as Alignment. Verlag für moderne Kunst.
    When it became uncool to speak of beauty with respect to pieces of art, physicists started claiming that their results are beautiful. They say, for example, that a theory's beauty speaks in favour of its truth, and that they strive to perform beautiful experiments. What does that mean? The notion cannot be defined. (It cannot be defined in the arts either). Therefore, I elucidate it with examples of optical experimentation. Desaguliers' white synthesis, for example, is more beautiful than Newton's, and (...)
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  29. Alison Ross (2011). Moral Metaphorics: Kant After Blumenberg. Thesis Eleven 104 (1):40-58.
    This paper examines the role of formal, aesthetic elements in motivating moral action. It proposes that Blumenberg’s analysis of the existential settings of myth and metaphor provide a useful framework to consider the conception and function of the aesthetic symbol in Kantian moral philosophy. In particular, it explores the hypothesis that Blumenberg’s analysis of ‘pregnance’ and ‘rhetoric’ are useful for identifying and evaluating the processes involved in self-persuasion to the moral perspective.
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  30. Hannes Rusch & Eckart Voland (2013). Evolutionary Aesthetics: An Introduction to Key Concepts and Current Issues. Aisthesis 6 (2):113-133.
    In this article we try to give a philosophically reflected introductory overview of the current theoretical developments in the field of evolutionary aesthetics. Our aim is not completeness. Rather, we try to depict some of the central assumptions and explanatory tools frequently used in evolutionary accounts of human aesthetical preferences and address a number of currently debated, open research questions.
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  31. Robert Francis John Seddon (2013). Getting 'Virtual' Wrongs Right. Ethics and Information Technology 15 (1):1-11.
    Whilst some philosophical progress has been made on the ethical evaluation of playing video games, the exact subject matter of this enquiry remains surprisingly opaque. ‘Virtual murder’, simulation, representation and more are found in a literature yet to settle into a tested and cohesive terminology. Querying the language of the virtual in particular, I suggest that it is at once inexplicit and laden with presuppositions potentially liable to hinder anyone aiming to construct general philosophical claims about an ethics of gameplay, (...)
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  32. Aaron Smuts (2010). The Ethics of Humor: Can Your Sense of Humor Be Wrong? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (3):333-47.
    I distill three somewhat interrelated approaches to the ethical criticism of humor: (1) attitude-based theories, (2) merited-response theories, and (3) emotional responsibility theories. I direct the brunt of my effort at showing the limitations of the attitudinal endorsement theory by presenting new criticisms of Ronald de Sousa’s position. Then, I turn to assess the strengths of the other two approaches, showing that that their major formulations implicitly require the problematic attitudinal endorsement theory. I argue for an effects-mediated responsibility theory , (...)
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  33. Aaron Smuts (2009). What is Interactivity? Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (4):pp. 53-73.
    I argue that the term "interactive" should be considered a general-purpose term that indicates something about whatever it is applied to, whether that is art, artifact, or nature. I base my definition in the notion of "interacting with" something. First, I look for essential features of this relation, and then using these features, I develop a notion of interactivity that can help distinguish the interactive from non-interactive arts. Although I am skeptical of the benefits interactivity affords, interactive artworks are significant (...)
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  34. Marcel Stchedroff (1985). Review of Eva Schaper, Pleasure, Preference and Value. [REVIEW] Philosophical Books 26 (1):55-58.
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  35. Katie Terezakis (2009). Editor's Introduction and Open Letter on the Real Problem of Woman. In , Engaging Agnes Heller: A Critical Companion. Lexington Books.
  36. Katie Terezakis (2009). To Agnes Heller: An Open Letter on Philosophy and the Real Problem of Woman. In , Engaging Agnes Heller: A Critical Companion. Lexington Books. 123.
    This "open letter" examines Agnes Heller's seemingly ambivilent position on feminism, as well as her pedegogy, her reading of Plato, her "ethics of personality," and her positions on critique and on "everyday life.".
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  37. Joanna Klara Teske (2011). Should Not “Beauty and Pleasure” Be Complemented with “Cognition and Communication”? Reflections Upon Denis Dutton's Art Instinct: Beauty, Pleasure and Human Evolution. Diametros 28:105-114.
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  38. Jonathan Webber (2009). Reconstructing Alfie. The Philosophers' Magazine (47):61-66.
    Good stories tend to get told and retold, over and over again, mutating in the process. They adapt to different times and places, taking on and sloughing off embellishments as they are handed on. They persist through a kind of evolution. This is how it has always been and how it must be. Tales cannot survive otherwise. But this does not mean that all mutations are equally acceptable. For critical discussion is part of the environment in which stories survive. So (...)
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  39. Scott Zeman (2009). By Grace of Broken Skin. Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1/2):289-313.
    I address the question of the origins and historical meaning of art. Analyzing suggestions from Marx, Derrida, Winnicott, and Todorov, I claim that art doesn’t simply represent conscious, historical events but is also the continuing presentation of the prehistorical break-up of our “original” human family. Indeed, perpetuating yet distancing this archaic scene of community and violence in tension, art performs this mediation not just in history but also as history, as a secretive historiography of splitting and meaning-making. To this end, (...)
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