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  1. Peter Abbs (1991). From Babble to Rhapsody: On the Nature of Creativity. British Journal of Aesthetics 31 (4):291-300.
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  2. Emmanuel Alloa (2015). Produktiver Schein. Phänomenotechnik zwischen Wissenschaft und Ästhetik. Zeitschrift für Ästhetik Und Allgemeine Kunstwissenschaft 60 (2):169-182.
    The notion of ‘phenomenotechnique’ which Gaston Bachelard introduced in the 1930’s has enjoyed popularity among historians of science who used it in order to insist upon the technical and social mediateness of scientific facts. In the wake of the current triumphal return to epistemological ‘realism,’ the idea of phenomenotechnique has been dismissed as an alleged relic of ‘constructivism.’ The article advocates for a different reading of ‘phenomenotechnique,’ which, rather than insisting on the fabrication of the scientific fact, highlights the intrinsic (...)
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  3. Jiri Benovsky (2012). Aesthetic Supervenience Vs. Aesthetic Grounding. Estetika 49 (2):166–178.
    The claim that the having of aesthetic properties supervenes on the having of non-aesthetic properties has been widely discussed and, in various ways, defended. In this paper, I will show that even if it is sometimes true that a supervenience relation holds between aesthetic properties and the 'subvenient' non-aesthetic ones, it is not the interesting relation in the neighbourhood. As we shall see, a richer, asymmetric and irreflexive relation is required, and I shall defend the claim that the more-and-more-popular relation (...)
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  4. Maria Brincker (2015). The Aesthetic Stance - on the Conditions and Consequences of Becoming a Beholder. In Alfonsina Scarinzi (ed.), Aesthetics and the Embodied Mind: Beyond Art Theory and the Cartesian Mind-Body Dichotomy. Springer 117-138.
    What does it mean to be an aesthetic beholder? Is it different than simply being a perceiver? Most theories of aesthetic perception focus on 1) features of the perceived object and its presentation or 2) on psychological evaluative or emotional responses and intentions of perceiver and artist. In this chapter I propose that we need to look at the process of engaged perception itself, and further that this temporal process of be- coming a beholder must be understood in its embodied, (...)
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  5. Joanna Frueh (2003). Vaginal Aesthetics. Hypatia 18 (4):137-158.
    : Based on the premise that ugliness looms large in both cultural and women's consciousness of vaginas, I create a representation of the vagina's beauty as rich and sweet. Smell, taste, and touch play predominant roles as I use scholarly analysis and my own autobiographical narratives and poems and poetic language in order to redress the vagina's culturally inherited ugliness.
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  6. David Haley (2003). Species Nova [To See Anew]: Art as Ecology. Ethics and the Environment 8 (1):143 - 150.
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  7. Casey Haskins (2011). Aesthetics as an Intellectual Network. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):297-308.
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  8. Hilde Hein (1998). Why Not Feminist Aesthetic Theory? Journal of Speculative Philosophy 12 (1):20 - 34.
  9. María José Alcaraz León (2012). Art in Three Dimensions by Carroll, Noël. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):231-233.
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  10. Nadia Moro (2007). Il «cerchio labirintico dell’intelligibile». Sentimento e forma nella teoria del simbolo di Susanne K. Langer. ACME: Annali della Facoltà di lettere e filosofia dell'Università degli studi di Milano 40 (1):141-167.
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  11. John Passmore (1968). Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. Critica 2 (6):47 - 70.
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  12. Peter Rickman (2005). The Oxford Handbook of Aesthetics. Philosophy Now 52:40-40.
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  13. Hilary Robinson (2003). Book Review: Serena Anderlini-D'Onofrio. The ?Weak? Subject: On Modernity, Eros and Women's Playwriting. Cranbury, N.J.: Associated University Presses, 1998. [REVIEW] Hypatia 18 (3):242-245.
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  14. Rob van Gerwen (2004). Ethical Autonomism. Contemporary Aesthetics 2.
    The debate between autonomists and moralists, I argue, has turned into a stalemate due to two mistaken assumptions. Against these assumptions, I argue that the moral nature of a work's contents does not transfer to the work and that, if we are to morally evaluate works we should try to conceive of them as moral agents. Ethical autonomism holds that art's autonomy consists in its demand that art appreciators take up an artistic attitude. A work's agency then is in how (...)
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Aesthetics, General Works
  1. Lars-Olof Åhlberg (1993). The Nature and Limits of Analytic Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 33 (1):5-16.
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  2. Philip Alperson (1992). The Arts of Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 50 (3):217-230.
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  3. Ellen Fridland & Andrew Porter (2010). “Jackie O; or How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love My Chanel”. In Brian Seitz And Ron Scapp (ed.), Fashion Statements: On Style, Appearance, and Reality. Palgrave Macmillan
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  4. Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). Against Aesthetic-Sensory Dependence. Nordic Journal of Aesthetics.
    In his book 'The metaphysics of beauty' Nick Zangwill argues for the claim that aesthetic properties metaphysically necessarily depend on sensory properties. This claim plays a role in his argument against physicalist aesthetic realism as well as in the formulation of his own response-dependence view. In this article, I offer reasons to resist the aesthetic/sensory dependence claim by a discussion of the case of theories, theorems, proofs, and similar theoretical objects, which do possess genuinely aesthetic properties, while these (...)
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  5. Ben Blumson (2014). Resemblance and Representation. Open Book Publishers.
    It’s a platitude – which only a philosopher would dream of denying – that whereas words are connected to what they represent merely by arbitrary conventions, pictures are connected to what they represent by resemblance. The most important difference between my portrait and my name, for example, is that whereas my portrait and I are connected by my portrait’s resemblance to me, my name and I are connected merely by an arbitrary convention. The first aim of this book is to (...)
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  6. Tomás N. Castro (2015). Uma topografia poética e estética em António Dacosta. Revista de História da Arte 12:266-277.
    This work departs from Beardsley’s critique to the intentional fallacy, in order to introduce the concept of artist’s concerns, extrinsic to works but manifest in them. Then, we will describe António Dacosta’s (1914-1990) unique career, considering topography the main poetical and aesthetic value for some works of the period 1984-1990. And, although they seem to depict islands, we will argue that Dacosta depicted insularity in an unparalleled way. -/- Este trabalho parte da crítica de Beardsley à falácia intencional para propor (...)
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  7. Clive Cazeaux (2012). Sensation as Participation in Visual Art. Aesthetic Pathways 2 (2):2-30.
    Can an understanding be formed of how sensory experience might be presented or manipulated in visual art in order to promote a relational concept of the senses, in opposition to the customary, capitalist notion of sensation as a private possession, as a sensory impression that is mine? I ask the question in the light of recent visual art theory and practice which pursue relational, ecological ambitions. As Arnold Berleant, Nicolas Bourriaud, and Grant Kester see it, ecological ambition and artistic form (...)
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  8. Jonathan Owen Clark (2013). Aesthetic Experience, Subjective Historical Experience and the Problem of Constructivism. Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (1):57-81.
    This article takes as its starting point the recent work of Frank Ankersmit on subjective historical experience. Such an experience, which Ankersmit describes as a ‘sudden obliteration of the rift between present and past’ is connected strongly with the Deweyan theory of art as experiential, which contains an account of aesthetic experience as affording a similar breakdown in the polarization of the subject and object of experience. The article shows how other ideas deriving from the phenomenological tradition and the philosophy (...)
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  9. Benjamin L. Curtis & Darrin Baines (2016). What Is an Antique? Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):75-86.
    Antiques are undoubtedly objects worthy of aesthetic appreciation, but do they have a distinctive aesthetic value in virtue of being antiques? In this article we give an account of what it is to be an antique that gives the thesis that they do have a distinctive aesthetic value a chance of being true and suggests what that distinctive value consists in. After introducing our topic in Section I, in Section II we develop and defend the Adjectival Thesis: the thesis that (...)
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  10. Daniel Dohrn, According to the Fiction. A Metaexpressivist Account. Proceedings of the European Society of Aesthetics 7.
    Abstract. I outline the standard picture of fiction. According to this picture, fiction is centred on making believe some truth-apt content. I take a closer look at everyday usage of the expressions ‘according to the fiction’ and ‘in the fiction’ to countervail the streamlining tendencies that come with the standard picture. Having outlined highly variegated use patterns, I argue for a metaexpressivist picture: ‘according to the fiction’ does not primarily report fictional truth but a complex pattern of reactions the fiction (...)
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  11. Veronique Fóti (2014). Sensuous Presencing and Artistic Creation: The Aesthetic Legacy of Merleau-Ponty’s Thought [on Emmanuel Alloa & Adnen Jdey, Du Sensible À L'Oeuvre. Esthétiques de Merleau-Ponty, 2012]. [REVIEW] Comparative and Continental Philosophy 6 (2):203-210.
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  12. Jonathan Gilmore (2013). That Obscure Object of Desire: Pleasure in Painful Art. In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Suffering Art Gladly: The Paradox of Negative Emotions in Art. Palgrave/Macmillan
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  13. Athanasia Glycofrydi-Leontsini (1996). The Classic and the Romantic in Neohellenic Aesthetics. Annals of Aesthetics 36:191-210.
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  14. Robert Hopkins (2006). Critical Reasoning and Critical Perception. In Matthew Kieran & Dominic Lopes (eds.), Knowing Art. Springer 137-153.
    The outcome of criticism is a perception. Does this mean that criticism cannot count as a rational process? For it to do so, it seems it would have to be possible for there to be an argument for a perception. Yet perceptions do not seem to be the right sort of item to serve as the conclusions of arguments. Is this appearance borne out? I examine why perceptions might not be able to play that role, and explore what would have (...)
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  15. Gaetano Iaia (2007). Matthias Grünewald e l’Altare di Isenheim, tra “Ars Pictorica” e Teologia. Proculus 81 (3/4):289-297.
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  16. Christy Mag Uidhir (2011). Minimal Authorship (of Sorts). Philosophical Studies 154 (3):373-387.
    I propose a minimal account of authorship that specifies the fundamental nature of the author-relation and its minimal domain composition in terms of a three-place causal-intentional relation holding between agents and sort-relative works. I contrast my account with the minimal account tacitly held by most authorship theories, which is a two-place relation holding between agents and works simpliciter. I claim that only my view can ground productive and informative principled distinctions between collective production and collective authorship.
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  17. Jennifer A. McMahon, Beauty. Oxford Bibliographies Online: Philosophy.
    This is an 18,500 word bibliography of philosophical scholarship on Beauty which was published online in the Oxford Bibliographies Online. The entry includes an Introduction of 800 words, 21 x 400-word sub-themes and 168 annotated references. INTRODUCTION Philosophical interest in beauty began with the earliest recorded philosophers. Beauty was deemed to be an essential ingredient in a good life and so what it was, where it was to be found and how it was to be included in a life were (...)
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  18. Ellen Miller (2002). Philosophizing with Sylvia Plath: An Embodied Hermeneutic of Color in Ariel. Philosophy Today 46 (2):91-101.
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  19. Olaf L. Müller (2009). Colour Spectral Counterpoints. Case Study on Aestetic Judgement in the Experimental Sciences. In Ingo Nussbaumer & Galerie Hubert Winter (eds.), Restraint versus Intervention: Painting as Alignment. Verlag Für Moderne Kunst
    When it became uncool to speak of beauty with respect to pieces of art, physicists started claiming that their results are beautiful. They say, for example, that a theory's beauty speaks in favour of its truth, and that they strive to perform beautiful experiments. What does that mean? The notion cannot be defined. (It cannot be defined in the arts either). Therefore, I elucidate it with examples of optical experimentation. Desaguliers' white synthesis, for example, is more beautiful than Newton's, and (...)
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  20. Tiger C. Roholt (2013). Key Terms in Philosophy of Art. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Key Terms in Philosophy of Art offers a clear, concise and accessible introduction to a vital sub-field of philosophy. The book offers a comprehensive overview of the key terms, concepts, thinkers and major works in the history of this key area of philosophical thought. Ideal for first-year students coming to the subject for the first time, Key Terms in Philosophy of Art will serve as the ideal companion to the study of this fascinating subject. -/- Tiger C. Roholt provides detailed (...)
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  21. Tiger C. Roholt (2007). Reading Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art: Selected Texts with Interactive Commentary. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (3):319-320.
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  22. Brian Seitz And Ron Scapp (ed.) (2010). Fashion Statements: On Style, Appearance, and Reality. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  23. Andrea Sauchelli (2014). Sibley on ‘Beautiful’ and ‘Ugly’. Philosophical Papers 43 (3):377-404.
    Frank Sibley's ideas have been particularly influential among contemporary philosophers interested in aesthetics. Most studies, however, have focused only on his earlier works. In this essay, I explore Sibley's account of the adjectives ‘beautiful’ and ‘ugly’, paying particular attention to three papers that have only recently been published and that have not yet received adequate attention. In particular, I discuss his account of the adjective ‘beautiful’, which relies on the controversial notion of an aesthetic ideal. In addition, I discuss an (...)
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  24. Beau Shaw (2015). Nietzsche, Humor and Masochism. Israeli Journal for Humor Research 4 (2):31-50.
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  25. S. Sim (2013). Miscellaneous Texts I: Aesthetics and Theory of Art, and Miscellaneous Texts II: Contemporary Artists (Together Volume 4 of Jean-Francois Lyotard: Writings on Contemporary Art and Artists). British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):133-136.
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  26. Lars Spuybroek (2014). Charis and Radiance: The Ontological Dimensions of Beauty. In S. Van Tuinen (ed.), Giving and Taking: Antidotes to a Culture of Greed. 119-149.
  27. Lars Spuybroek (2012). The Ages of Beauty: Revisiting Hartshorne's Diagram of Aesthetic Values. In A. Mulder (ed.), Vital Beauty: Reclaiming Aesthetics in the Tangle of Technology and Nature. 32-63.
  28. Lars Spuybroek (2011). The Sympathy of Things: Ruskin and the Ecology of Design. V2_NAI Publishers.
  29. Danilo Šuster (2005). The Modality Principle and Work-Relativity of Modality. Acta Analytica 20 (4):41-52.
    Davies argues that the ontology of artworks as performances offers a principled way of explaining work-relativity of modality. Object oriented contextualist ontologies of art (Levinson) cannot adequately address the problem of work-relativity of modal properties because they understand looseness in what counts as the same context as a view that slight differences in the work-constitutive features of provenance are work-relative. I argue that it is more in the spirit of contextualism to understand looseness as context-dependent. This points to the general (...)
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  30. Paulo Vélez León (2012). Hay Un Arte Islámico? Una Posible Pregunta Sobre El Estatuto Del Arte Islámico, Desde Una Perspectiva Occidental [Is There an Islamic Art? A Possible Question About the Status of Islamic Art, From a Western Perspective]. ASRI – Arte y Sociedad. Revista de Investigación 2:1-7.
    The question of the status-onto-epistemological-the art is plausible to apply it to any context and cultural domain? Some authors argue that yes without any remorse, address this position in this note: [1] makes a briefly is a bibliographic description of the debates on this problematic, [2] raises the issue of the status of art, within the framework supported by Belting and Lessing, and [3] in correspondence with the above, indicated summarily the difficulties and considerations to take into account when attempting (...)
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  31. Mélanie Walton (2012). Sam Francis: Lesson of Darkness: “Like the Paintings of a Blind Man.” by Lyotard, Jean-François. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (2):249-251.
    Neither art criticism nor a scholar’s monograph on an artist, Jean-François Lyotard’s Sam Francis: Lesson of Darkness: ‘like the paintings of a blind man’ is a reflection that engages both the painter and 43 of his works into a conversation alternating painting and aphoristic writing. Their order follows neither the chronology of the works nor a linear argument in the prose. And yet, the work generates the strongest feeling of there being a continuity in this peculiar dialogue of pictures (...)
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Aesthetics, Misc
  1. Douglas Anderson (1986). Review of Eva Schaper, Pleasure, Preference and Value. [REVIEW] Idealistic Studies 16 (2):186-187.
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  2. James Andow (2015). A Semantic Solution to the Problem with Aesthetic Testimony. Acta Analytica 30 (2):211-218.
    There is something peculiar about aesthetic testimony. It seems more difficult to gain knowledge of aesthetic properties based solely upon testimony than it is in the case of other types of property. In this paper, I argue that we can provide an adequate explanation at the level of the semantics of aesthetic language, without defending any substantive thesis in epistemology or about aesthetic value/judgement. If aesthetic predicates are given a non-invariantist semantics, we can explain the supposed peculiar difficulty with aesthetic (...)
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  3. Hanne Appelqvist (2011). On Music, Wine, and the Criteria of Understanding. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 12 (1):18-35.
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  4. D. C. B. (1961). Review of Engel, The Problem of Tragedy. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):723-723.
  5. Carl Baker (forthcoming). An Absolutist Theory of Faultless Disagreement. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly.
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