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  1. María José Alcaraz León (2013). Aesthetic Insight: The Aesthetic Value of Damaged Environments. Estetika 50 (2):169-186.
    In this article I start by assuming that positive aesthetic experiences of damaged nature are possible and I argue for the idea that the aesthetic pleasure derived from that contemplation might reveal something of the environment’s overall character. I hope to show that positive aesthetic experiences sometimes help to promote emotional attitudes that can lead to insight into the configuration of other non-aesthetic attitudes. In order to do so, I critically appeal to some of the thoughts Kant articulated about the (...)
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  2. By Allen Carlson (2005). Budd and Brady on the Aesthetics of Nature. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 55 (218):106–113.
    This essay is a critical notice of Malcolm Budd's _The Aesthetics of Nature (Oxford, 2002) and Emily Brady's _Aesthetics of the Natural Environment (Edinburgh, 2003). I argue that, although each of the volumes makes an important contribution to our understanding of the aesthetic experience of nature, the accounts of aesthetic appreciation of nature that are developed by Budd and Brady are each somewhat defective in that neither grants an adequate role to knowledge in such appreciation, and specifically to scientific knowledge.
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  3. Sven Arntzen & Emily Brady (eds.) (2008). Humans in the Land: The Ethics and Aesthetics of the Cultural Landscape. Unipub.
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  4. John D. Barrow (2005). The Artful Universe Expanded. Oxford University Press.
    Our love of art, writes John Barrow, is the end product of millions of years of evolution. How we react to a beautiful painting or symphony draws upon instincts laid down long before humans existed. Now, in this enhanced edition of the highly popular The Artful Universe, Barrow further explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe. Barrow argues that the laws of the Universe have imprinted themselves upon our thoughts and actions in (...)
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  5. John D. Barrow (1995). The Artful Universe. Oxford University Press.
    Our likes and dislikes--our senses and sensibilities--did not fall ready-made from the sky, argues internationally acclaimed author John D. Barrow. We know we enjoy a beautiful painting or a passionate symphony, but what we don't necessarily understand is that these experiences conjure up latent instincts laid down and perpetuated over millions of years. Now, in The Artful Universe, Barrow explores the close ties between our aesthetic appreciation and the basic nature of the Universe, challenging the commonly held view that our (...)
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  6. Mario Bédard (ed.) (2009). Le Paysage, Un Projet Politique. Presses de l'Université du Québec.
    Poser ces questions, est-il soutenu dans ce recueil qui explore les référents culturels et les imaginaires paysagers issus de l'histoire, des pratiques d'aménagement et des politiques du paysage au Canada et en Europe, n'est-ce pas se ...
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  7. A. Berleant (2013). The Art in Knowing a Landscape. Diogenes 59 (1-2):52-62.
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  8. Alberto Bertagna (2011). The Landscape of Waste. Skira.
    The first book ever published to survey waste as a building material. Focusing on the projects, this book gives readers the tools they need to grasp the language and forms of a new architectural language and offers scientific and non-biased overviews to ensure credibility in the environmental science and engineering communities.
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  9. Alberto Bertagna (ed.) (2010). Paesaggi Fatti Ad Arte. Quodlibet.
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  10. Emily Brady (2003). Aesthetics of the Natural Environment. University of Alabama Press.
    Emily Brady provides a systematic account of aesthetics in relation to the natural environment, offering a critical understanding of what aesthetic appreciation ...
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  11. Franco Brevini (2013). L'invenzione Della Natura Selvaggia: Storia di Un'idea Dal Xviii Secolo a Oggi. Bollati Boringhieri.
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  12. M. Budd (1998). Delight in the Natural World: Kant on the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. Part 1: Natural Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 38 (1):1-18.
  13. Malcolm Budd (2006). Objectivity and the Aesthetic Value of Nature: Reply to Parsons. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (3):267-273.
    The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature I advance a view of the aesthetic value of nature that Glenn Parsons seeks to contest. Here I attempt to show three things. The first is that his critique of my view of the aesthetic value of a natural thing is malfounded. The second is that his proposed alternative, which is intended to vindicate the claim to objectivity of certain judgements of the aesthetic value of a natural thing, is unconvincing. And the third is that, (...)
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  14. Malcolm Budd (2002). The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature: Essays on the Aesthetics of Nature. Oxford University Press.
    The aesthetics of nature has over the last few decades become an intense focus of philosophical reflection, as it has been ever more widely recognised that it is not a mere appendage to the aesthetics of art. Everyone delights in the beauty of flowers, and some are thrilled by the immensity of mountains or of the night sky. But what is involved in serious aesthetic appreciation of the natural world? Malcolm Budd presents four interlinked studies in the aesthetics of nature, (...)
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  15. Malcolm Budd (1996). The Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 36 (3):207-222.
    The aesthetics of nature has over the last few decades become an intense focus of philosophical reflection, as it has been ever more widely recognised that it is not a mere appendage to the aesthetics of art. Just as nature offers aesthetic experiences beyond the reach of art, so the aesthetics of nature raises issues not contained within the philosophy of art. -/- Malcolm Budd presents four interlinked essays addressing all the main problems about the aesthetics of nature. These include: (...)
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  16. Malcom Budd (2000). The Aesthetics of Nature. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (2):137–157.
    I begin by demonstrating the inadequacy of the idea that the aesthetic appreciation of nature should be understood as the appreciation of nature as if it were art. This leads to a consideration of three theses: (i) from the aesthetic point of view natural items should be appreciated under concepts of the natural things or phenomena they are, (ii) what aesthetic properties a natural item really possesses is determined by the right categories of nature to experience the item as falling (...)
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  17. Sara Cannizzaro (2009). “The Line of Beauty”. In Leonard Sbrocchi & John Deely (eds.), Semiotics 2008. Legas Publishing. 849-857.
    There seems to be a relation or some sort of 'unity' between man's works and the spontaneously occurring works produced by nature such as shells, nests, horns and so on. To use Bertalanffy's term for describing common properties of objects or systems (1973), nature's forms and human forms are isomorphic. For example, efficient structures typical of shells or plants such as spirals and radii, are very common archetypes that recur throughout the whole body of humans' architecture. A spiral form can (...)
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  18. Ananda Kentish Coomaraswamy (1995). The Transformation of Nature in Art. Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd..
    The theory of art in Asia.--Meister Eckhart's view of art.--Reactions to art in India.--Aesthetic of the Śukranītsāra.--Paroksa.--Ábhása.--Origin and use of images in India.--Notes.--Sanskrit glossary.--List of Chinese characters.--Bibliography (p. [235]-245).
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  19. David E. Cooper (2003). In Praise of Gardens. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (2):101-113.
    The paper asks whether gardens may be objects of ‘serious’ (in Ronald Hepburn's sense) and distinctive appreciation. Dismissive attitudes to the possibility of such appreciation, including Hegel's, are rejected, as is the view—Kant's, for example—that garden appreciation is ‘factorizable’ into the modes appropriate for artworks and ‘raw’ nature respectively. That view entails that there is nothing distinctive in garden appreciation. Attention then turns to the idea that it is the representational/symbolic capacities of gardens that render them objects of distinctive appreciation. (...)
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  20. Roger G. Courtenay (2010). My Kind of Countryside: Finding Design Principles in the Land. Distributed by the University of Chicago Press.
    Breathing ground -- Moving in nature -- Making buildings -- Modifying places -- My kind of countryside.
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  21. Sylvia Crowe (1988). The Pattern of Landscape. Packard Pub..
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  22. Paolo D'Angelo (2010). Filosofia Del Paesaggio. Quodlibet.
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  23. Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (2013). Delighting in Natural Beauty: Joint Attention and the Phenomenology of Nature Aesthetics. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (4):167-186.
    Empirical research in the psychology of nature appreciation suggests that humans across cultures tend to evaluate nature in positive aesthetic terms, including a sense of beauty and awe. They also frequently engage in joint attention with other persons, whereby they are jointly aware of sharing attention to the same event or object. This paper examines how, from a natural theological perspective, delight in natural beauty can be conceptualized as a way of joining attention to creation. Drawing on an analogy between (...)
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  24. Bernhard Edmaier (2007). Patterns of the Earth. Phaidon.
    Bands -- Stripes -- Ripples -- Circles -- Spots -- Grains -- Forks -- Branches -- Webs -- Curves -- Ribbons -- Swirls -- Spikes -- Grids -- Cracks.
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  25. C. E. Emmer (2004). Representing Place. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 57 (3):610-612.
  26. C. E. Emmer (2001). The Senses of the Sublime: Possibilities for a Non-Ocular Sublime in Kant's Critique of Judgment. In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, Vol. 3. Walter de Gruyter.
    It might at first seem that the senses (the five traditionally recognized conduits of outer sense) would have very little to contribute to an investigation of Kant's aesthetics. Is not Kant's aesthetic theory based on a relation of the higher cognitive faculties? Much however can be revealed by asking to what degree sight is essential to aesthetic judgment (of beauty and the sublime) as Kant describes it in the 'Critique of Judgment.' Here the sublime receives particular attention.
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  27. Guang Ge (2007). Sheng Tai Wen Yi Yu Zhongguo Wen Yi Si Xiang de Xian Dai Zhuan Huan. Qi Lu Shu She.
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  28. R. Guerrero & C. Aura (eds.) (2009). Paisajes de la Modernidad En Venezuela (1811-1960). Universidad de Los Andes, Consejo de Publicaciones.
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  29. Gary D. Hampe (1974). Water-Related Aesthetic Preferences of Wyoming Residents. University of Wyoming, Water Resources Research Institute.
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  30. Susan Herrington (2009). On Landscapes. Routledge.
    There is no escaping landscape: it's everywhere and part of everyone's life. Landscapes have received much less attention in aesthetics than those arts we can choose to ignore, such as painting or music – but they can tell us a lot about the ethical and aesthetic values of the societies that produce them. Drawing on examples from a wide range of landscapes from around the world and throughout history, Susan Herrington considers the ways landscapes can affect our emotions, our imaginations, (...)
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  31. Bingsheng Huang & Dingsheng Yuan (eds.) (2004). Min Zu Sheng Tai Shen Mei Xue. Min Zu Chu Ban She.
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  32. Galen A. Johnson (2007). Philosophy and the Forest: Toward an Aesthetics of Wood. Environmental Philosophy 4 (1,2):59-75.
  33. Božidar Kante (2009). Estetika Narave. Založba Sophia.
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  34. Salim Kemal & Ivan Gaskell (eds.) (1993). Landscape, Natural Beauty, and the Arts. Cambridge University Press.
    In Landscape, Natural Beauty, and the Arts, a distinguished group of scholars probes the complex structure of aesthetic responses to nature. Each of the chapters refines and expands the terms of discussion, and together they enrich the debate with insights from art history, literary criticism, geography and philosophy. To explore the interrelation between our conceptions of nature, beauty and art, the contributors consider the social construction of nature, the determination of our appreciation by artistic media, and the duality of nature's (...)
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  35. Jeremi T. Królikowski (2006). Interpretacje Krajobrazów. Wydawnictwo Sggw.
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  36. Aline Leal (ed.) (2007). Um Olhar Ecológico. Ibap-Rj.
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  37. Alcaraz León & María José (2013). Aesthetic Insight: The Aesthetic Value of Damaged Environments. Estetika 50 (2):169-186.
    In this article I start by assuming that positive aesthetic experiences of damaged nature are possible and I argue for the idea that the aesthetic pleasure derived from that contemplation might reveal something of the environment’s overall character. I hope to show that positive aesthetic experiences sometimes help to promote emotional attitudes that can lead to insight into the configuration of other non-aesthetic attitudes. In order to do so, I critically appeal to some of the thoughts Kant articulated about the (...)
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  38. Han Lörzing (2001). The Nature of Landscape: A Personal Quest. 010 Publishers.
    Back in 1983, I saw a movie called Koyaanisqatsi in an Amsterdam cinema. The film had no actors; in the leading parts were landscapes from all over the ...
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  39. Jeff Malpas (ed.) (2011). The Place of Landscape: Concepts, Contexts, Studies. Mit Press.
    Interdisciplinary perspectives on landscape, from the philosophical to the geographical, with an emphasis on the overarching concept of place.
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  40. Eduardo Martínez de Pisón & Nicolás Ortega (eds.) (2009). Los Valores Del Paisaje. Fundación Duques de Soria.
    No. 135: LOS VALORES DEL PAISAJE Ponencias del Seminario del Paisaje (2008) que abordan con distintos puntos de vista los valores del paisaje, buscando entender mejor los significados del paisaje en el horizonte de la modernidad, las cualidades que se le atribuyen y el sentido que de esa manera adquiere.
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  41. Patrick Maynard (1987). A Legacy of Light: Review of Ansel Adams: An Autobiography; and Mark Klett, Travels in the Desert Southwest. [REVIEW] Canadian Review of American Studies 18 (1):127-131.
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  42. Marie Mianowski (ed.) (2012). Irish Contemporary Landscapes in Literature and the Arts. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  43. Raffaele Milani (2005). Il Paesaggio È Un'avventura: Invito Al Piacere di Viaggiare E di Guardare. Feltrinelli.
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  44. Eric C. Mullis (2011). Nature and Landscape: An Introduction to Environmental Aesthetics by Carlson, Allen. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (2):238-240.
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  45. Finola O'Kane (2012). Ireland and the Picturesque. Yale University Press.
    Adorning the Country with Ruins -- The Western Baroque Landscape -- The Irish Tours -- Designing Picturesque Ireland -- Epilogue: Studies in a Point of View.
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  46. Bart Ooghe & Geert Verhoeven (eds.) (2007). Broadening Horizons: Multidisciplinary Approaches to Landscape Study. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
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  47. Spyros Papapetros (2012). On the Animation of the Inorganic: Art, Architecture, and the Extension of Life. University of Chicago Press.
    Animation victims: an abridged history of animated response -- Animated history -- The movement of accessories -- Fabric extensions and textual supplements from modern and antique fragments -- The movement of snakes -- Pneumatic impulses and bygone appendages from Philo to Warburg -- The afterlife of crystals -- Art historical biology and the animation of the inorganic -- Inorganic culture -- Nudes in the forest -- Models, sciences, and legends in a landscape by Léger -- Malicious houses -- Animism and (...)
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  48. Glenn Parsons (2008). Teaching & Learning Guide For: The Aesthetics of Nature. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1106-1112.
    Traditionally, analytic philosophers writing on aesthetics have given short shrift to nature. The last thirty years, however, have seen a steady growth of interest in this area. The essays and books now available cover central philosophical issues concerning the nature of the aesthetic and the existence of norms for aesthetic judgement. They also intersect with important issues in environmental philosophy. More recent contributions have opened up new topics, such as the relationship between natural sound and music, the beauty of animals, (...)
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  49. Glenn Parsons (2006). Freedom and Objectivity in the Aesthetic Appreciation of Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):17-37.
    Natural beauty has often been viewed as a somewhat vague and subjective matter. Even theorists who view disputes concerning the aesthetic value of artworks as involving correct and incorrect judgements have argued that, in many disputes concerning natural beauty, there are no correct or incorrect judgements. In this essay, I consider recent attempts to develop a more objectivist view of nature appreciation based on the role of scientific knowledge in such appreciation. In response to recent criticisms of this approach, I (...)
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  50. Glenn Parsons (2004). Natural Functions and the Aesthetic Appreciation of Inorganic Nature. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):44-56.
    The distinction between organic and inorganic nature receives little attention in contemporary nature aesthetics. Traditionally, however, this distinction was considered to have important aesthetic ramifications. Nick Zangwill has recently suggested that aesthetic differences between organic and inorganic nature arise because natural functions are present only in organic nature (for example, in the parts of organisms). I argue for a different explanation: though inorganic nature too has natural functions, these are metaphysically distinct from those characteristic of organic nature. I defend the (...)
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