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Aesthetics

Edited by Rafael De Clercq (Lingnan University)
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  1. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). Kantian and Nietzschean Aesthetics of Human Nature: A Comparison Between the Beautiful/Sublime and Apollonian/Dionysian Dualities. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):166-217.
    Both for Kant and for Nietzsche, aesthetics must not be considered as a systematic science based merely on logical premises but rather as a set of intuitively attained artistic ideas that constitute or reconstitute the sensible perceptions and supersensible representations into a new whole. Kantian and Nietzschean aesthetics are both aiming to see beyond the forms of objects to provide explanations for the nobility and sublimity of human art and life. We can safely say that Kant and Nietzsche used the (...)
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  2. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):218-237.
    Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis (...)
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  3. added 2016-05-23
    Gemma Arguello Manresa (2016). La Paradoja del Suspenso Anómalo. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 68:49-65.
    Resumen: En este trabajo se aborda lo que en los debates recientes de filosofía del cine se ha denominado la paradoja del suspenso. Esta paradoja radica en el problema de que algunos espectadores sienten suspenso frente a una narración que ya conocían, partiendo del presupuesto de que la incertidumbre es un estado cognitivo necesario para sentir esta emoción. Se analizan varias propuestas recientes y se ofrece una alternativa a la mismas en la que se recupera la simpatía y la anticipación (...)
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  4. added 2016-05-23
    Gemma Arguello Manresa (2015). Relational Architecture: "Voz Alta" (Loud Voice), Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. In Jakub Petri (ed.), Performing Cultures. Institute of Philosophy of Jagiellonian University 43-51.
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  5. added 2016-05-23
    Gemma Arguello Manresa (2015). Arte de apropiación. Reconsideraciones alrededor del problema de los indiscernibles en Danto. Páginas de Filosofía 16 (19):80-95.
    Resumen: En este trabajo se desarrollan los argumentos que Arthur Danto elaboró en torno al significado metafórico y el estilo con el objetivo de mostrar si es posible que su modelo permita comprender nuevas formas de Arte de Apropiación. Éstas engloban las prácticas recientes en las que los artistas hacen réplicas más o menos exactas de otras obras que han sido importantes en la historia del arte. -/- Abstract: In this paper Arthur Danto’s arguments about metaphorical meaning and style are (...)
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  6. added 2016-05-22
    Derek Allan, Analytic Aesthetics and the Dilemma of Timelessness.
    Explores the failure of analytic aesthetics to examine the question of the capacity of art to transcend time, and its own commitment – seldom explicitly acknowledged – to the assumption that this capacity functions through the traditional, but no longer viable, notion of timelessness inherited from Enlightenment aesthetics.
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  7. added 2016-05-20
    Derek Allan (2016). The Death of Beauty: Goya's Etchings and Black Paintings Through the Eyes of André Malraux. History of European Ideas.
    Modern critics often regard Goya's etchings and black paintings as satirical observations on the social and political conditions of the time. In a study of Goya first published in 1950, which seldom receives the attention it merits, the French author and art theorist André Malraux contends that these works have a significance of a much deeper kind. The etchings and black paintings, Malraux argues, represent a fundamental challenge to the European artistic tradition that began with the Renaissance, an essentially (...)
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  8. added 2016-05-17
    Cristian Timmermann & Georges F. Félix (forthcoming). Food Sovereignty and the Global South. In Paul B. Thompson & David M. Kaplan (eds.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics. Springer
    Farmers’ organizations all over the world are very well aware that in order to build and retain a critical mass with sufficient bargaining power to democratically influence local governments and international organizations they will have to unite by identifying common goals and setting aside their differences. After decades of local movements and struggles, farmers’ organizations around the globe found in the concept of “food sovereignty” the normative framework they were long searching for. The broadness of the concept has had (...)
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  9. added 2016-05-13
    Fabian Dorsch (2016). Seeing-In as Aspect Perception. In Gary Kemp & Gabriele Mras (eds.), Wollheim, Wittgenstein, and Pictorial Representation: Seeing-as and Seeing-in. Routledge
  10. added 2016-05-08
    Derek Allan, Literature and the Passing of Time: Reflecting on the Temporal Nature of Art.
    The paper explores the much-neglected but crucial topic of the capacity of art to transcend time.
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  11. added 2016-05-08
    Derek Allan (2016). Vanquishing Temporal Distance: Malraux, Art and Metamorphosis. Australian Journal of French Studies 53 (1-2):136-148.
    How does art – literature, visual art, or music – endure over time? What special power does it possess that enables it to “transcend” time – to overcome temporal distance and speak to us not just as evidence of times gone by, but as a living presence? The Renaissance, which discovered this transcendent power of art in the classical sculpture and literature it admired so strongly, concluded that great art is impervious to time – “timeless”, “immortal”, “eternal” – a belief (...)
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  12. added 2016-05-05
    Judith Wolfe (2016). Hermione's Sophism: Ordinariness and Theatricality in The Winter's Tale. Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):83-105.
    For both Rush Rhees and Stanley Cavell, Wittgenstein’s late investigations into language and language games are caught up with a profound underlying concern about the possibility of discourse itself. Rhees and Cavell isolate two such conditions, which are closely related.The first, emphasized by Cavell, is what he calls “acknowledgment.” In his seminal essay “Knowing and Acknowledging”, Cavell engages traditional skeptical arguments against the possibility of knowing other minds. Unlike most philosophers, however, Cavell does not attempt to repudiate the skeptic’s concerns (...)
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  13. added 2016-05-01
    Abraham Schneider (2016). In the Presence of the Bird. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):543-553.
    To Dean Volek and Assembled Panel:Needless to say, the incident that transpired the morning of February the 8th was regrettable to all concerned—to Mrs. Horvath, who had to play witness to such a spectacle of savagery outside her office window, to the students who witnessed the same, to the college itself, which had to clean up the mess, literally as well as with the press—and of course my sincerest apologies to the local chapter of the Audubon Society, whose more enthusiastic (...)
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  14. added 2016-05-01
    Noel Carroll (2016). Danto's Comic Vision: Philosophical Method and Literary Style. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):554-563.
    Arthur Danto numbers among the few contemporary philosophers whose writing is really a pleasure to read. Although rarely recognized, the source of that pleasure is Danto’s humor. His philosophical writing is consistently comic. Of course, the humor is obviously not of the knee-slapping variety. Yet it is pervasively playful.Danto will introduce a thought experiment and then explore it in several directions. Unlike many other contemporary philosophers, he is not stingy in laying out his examples. Whereas it is customary for most (...)
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  15. added 2016-05-01
    Franz R. Kempf (2016). Noble Savages and English Gardeners: Kulturkritik From Rousseau to Goethe. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):422-442.
    “The human being embodies a tension between a nature which has since been lost and an unreachable Divine Creator,” writes Rudolf Borchardt in his book The Passionate Gardener. And he continues: “The garden stands at precisely the center of this tension and displaces itself, in accord with its fluctuations in the epoch and the individual, toward one or the other: toward nature or creativity. This is the deepest reason for which the human being dreams that our origins lie in a (...)
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  16. added 2016-05-01
    Ann Hartle (2016). "Sociable Wisdom": Montaigne's Transformation of Philosophy. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):285-304.
    Montaigne’s last words in the Essays—the words that capture his entire project—are “sociable wisdom.” Philosophy has been transformed from the “love of wisdom” to “sociable wisdom” and this transformation is, at the same time, the transformation of the human world, the production of society, a new mode of human association. What is “sociable wisdom” and how has it produced this remarkable effect?Philosophy means “the love of wisdom.” Although the term is believed to have been used first by Pythagoras, Socrates presents (...)
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  17. added 2016-05-01
    Mark Byers (2016). Imagining Uncertainty: Charles Olson and Karl Popper. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):443-458.
    In his preface to The Poverty of Historicism, Karl Popper graciously notified his readers of a major shortcoming in his study, first published in three parts in Economica in 1944 and 1945. Though he had “tried to show” in these papers that “historicism is a poor method,” they did not “actually refute historicism.”1 That is, though he had revealed historicism to be founded on “common misunderstandings of the methods of physics”, he had not logically refuted its two principal assumptions: that (...)
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  18. added 2016-04-30
    Walter Horn (forthcoming). Tonality, Musical Form, and Aesthetic Value. Perspectives of New Music 53.
    It has been claimed by Diana Raffman, that atonal (and in particular serial) music can have no aesthetic value, because it is in an important sense meaningless. This worthlessness is claimed to result from cognitive/psychological facts about human listeners that have been confirmed by empirical investigations such as those conducted by Lerdahl and Jackendoff. Similar assertions about the necessary inferiority of 12-tone music have been made by, among others, Taruskin, Cavell, and Goldman, some of whom echo Raffman’s suggestion that both (...)
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  19. added 2016-04-30
    Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2016). Kitsch and Bullshit. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):305-321.
    Harry Frankfurt’s twenty-two page long essay “On Bullshit” was published in 1986 in an academic journal and appeared as a stand-alone book in 2005. The small book was successful and has sparked many discussions by both academics and public intellectuals. In this article I want to examine if, in the realm of art, kitsch overlaps with bullshit as a sort of “aesthetic bullshit” or if there are differences between bullshit as a predominantly ethical phenomenon and kitsch, which works much more (...)
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  20. added 2016-04-30
    Willard Bohn (2016). Apollinaire and the Broken Wine Glass. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):459-467.
    Five days before his twenty-first birthday, Guillaume Apollinaire set out on an automobile trip that would in large part determine his future. Together with the Viscountess Elinor de Milhau, who had hired him to tutor her daughter in French, he left for Germany on August 21, 1901. Since the car averaged thirty kilometers an hour, it took them nine days to reach her villa on the Rhine, near Honnef. For the next year, Apollinaire tutored the daughter in the morning and (...)
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  21. added 2016-04-30
    Richard Eldridge (2016). On Alan Goldman's Philosophy and the Novel. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):564-571.
    It is worth at least a moment to note and praise Alan Goldman’s methodological stance in Philosophy and the Novel.1 Goldman reflects appreciatively on the achievements of specific novels in order to arrive at philosophically interesting results about interpretation and moral understanding. In his appreciative reflections, Goldman is aware of, but by no means bound by, recent work in experimental moral psychology and metaethics. The result is a powerful demonstration not only of the human, cognitive, and ethical interest of the (...)
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  22. added 2016-04-30
    Yi-Ping Ong (2016). Simone de Beauvoir's Theory of the Novel: The Opacity, Ambiguity, and Impartiality of Life. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):379-405.
    Between 1946 and 1965, a period during which her contemporaries are calling into question the value of traditional novelistic realism, Simone de Beauvoir develops an extended and nuanced account of the philosophical significance of the realist novel in essays such as “Littérature et métaphysique”, “An American Renaissance in France”, and “Que peut la littérature?”. Beauvoir’s central claim is that novels do philosophical work not by articulating theoretical positions or illustrating abstract themes but by reorienting philosophical ways of understanding truth, world, (...)
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  23. added 2016-04-30
    Jules Brody (2016). Reading Yeats: "The Fascination of What's Difficult". Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):487-494.
    As every teacher of literature knows, obscure writing is not necessarily the most problematic kind to deal with. A sonnet by Donne or an equal number of lines by Dylan Thomas will handily fill the teaching hour. But what about that other kind of writing, the kind that imposes silence, not by its obvious difficulty but by its infuriating obviousness, the perfection of its form, the simplicity of its language, the transparency of its meaning? There is no trouble filling the (...)
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  24. added 2016-04-30
    Gabriel Zoran (2016). Between Appropriation and Representation: Aristotle and the Concept of Imitation in Greek Thought. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):468-486.
    Let us imagine an actor on stage presenting an impersonation of a certain politician, his manners and his body language. Now, suppose another actor sitting in the audience, impressed by the show and deciding to adopt something of his colleague’s style. He rents another stage and presents an impersonation of the same politician according to what he has learned. What does he actually do? In a certain sense he “imitates” the politician, but in another sense he “imitates” the first actor, (...)
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  25. added 2016-04-30
    Jules Brody (2016). A Philological Reading of a Poem by Dylan Thomas. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):495-507.
    Last night I dived my beggar armDays deep in her breast that wore no heartFor me alone but only a rocked drumTelling the heart I broke of a good habitThat her loving, unfriendly limbsWould plunge my betrayal from sheet to skySo the betrayed might learn in the sun beamsOf the death in a bed in another country.1This poem, as far as I have been able to determine, has never been the object of any published critical commentary. The only help that (...)
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  26. added 2016-04-30
    Ernest Fontana (2016). Leopardi's Transgressive Calendar. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):538-542.
    The editors of the recently published English translation of Giacomo Leopardi’s Zibaldone—the philosophical and philological commentary/notebook begun in the summer of 1817, when he was 19 years of age, and abandoned in the winter of 1832, four years before his death in Naples—note that for the first time, in his entry on April 20, 1821, Leopardi supplements the date of the secular calendar with a Roman Catholic festival, such as Good Friday.1 Leopardi’s references to the Catholic calendar increase in early (...)
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  27. added 2016-04-30
    Aakanksha Virkar-Yates (2016). An Objective Chemistry: What T. S. Eliot Borrowed From Schopenhauer. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):527-537.
    In his 1926 lectures on metaphysical poetry, T. S. Eliot describes the work of Jules Laforgue as the “nearest verse equivalent to the philosophies of Schopenhauer and Hartmann,” a literary rendition of their philosophies of the unconscious and of annihilation.1 Yet, Eliot suggests, in Laforgue the system of Schopenhauer ultimately collapses; the poet does not find in the philosopher that metaphysical balance between thought and feeling he so desperately craves. Schopenhauer’s philosophy, Eliot asserts, is “muddled by feeling—for what is more (...)
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  28. added 2016-04-30
    Cara E. Palmer (2016). Failed Escape: Action and Avoidance of Responsibility in The English Patient. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):356-363.
    In Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient, Almásy favors an anonymity of identity based in private experience, and to that end hides his personal history from view. Almásy shields his personal experiences from the eyes of the individuals he encounters, as well as from the reader. This conscious act indicates that Almásy believes that the choices he makes do not matter, because who he is in relation to the world and to the greater forces of time and history is insignificant. He (...)
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  29. added 2016-04-30
    Rune Graulund (2016). Restrained Excess: Where Sophistication Meets the Grotesque. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):338-355.
    Readily conjured images of “grotesque” behavior—such as, say, vomiting on one’s plate during dinner or fornicating in public—are hard to envisage as acts of “sophistication.” In fact it seems that the grotesque constitutes the exact opposite of sophistication. For whereas the grotesque is loud and insistent, “characteristically [evoking] a sudden shock,” sophistication is characterized by that which is subdued and refined.1 Unlike the grotesque, which is to some extent defined by spectacle, sophistication is at its finest when it remains unnoticed. (...)
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  30. added 2016-04-30
    Mordechai Gordon (2016). Camus, Nietzsche, and the Absurd: Rebellion and Scorn Versus Humor and Laughter. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):364-378.
    Throughout his relatively short life, Albert Camus struggled with nihilism and the absurd nature of human existence. Indeed, many of his writings deal with the problem of nihilism and with the issues of suicide, murder, suffering, and mass death. Always serious in his writings yet never resorting to cynicism or despair, Camus advocated rebellion as a response to nihilism. The choice of rebellion as a response to the absurdity of human existence makes sense when one realizes that his life spanned (...)
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  31. added 2016-04-30
    Zoe Beenstock (2016). Lyrical Sociability: The Social Contract and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):406-421.
    Although all readers of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein agree with Victor that his creation of the monster was a mistake, few are certain about how it should be resolved. Shelley offers two vexed solutions to the problem of the creature. The first, explored in the plot of Frankenstein, unfolds with an air of tragic inevitability; Victor destroys his creature and—by extension—himself. But the second solution that Shelley raises, through the creature’s earnest behest that Victor make him a partner, also presents obstacles. (...)
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  32. added 2016-04-30
    Jules Brody (2016). Dylan Thomas, "Twenty-Four Years": A Philological Reading. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):508-526.
    Twenty-four years remind the tears of my eyes.In the groin of the natural doorway I crouched like a tailorSewing a shroud for a journeyBy the light of the meat-eating sun.Dressed to die, the sensual strut begun,With my red veins full of money,In the final direction of the elementary townI advance for as long as forever is.1The first problem raised in this poem is the agrammatical status of the word remind, which in normal usage governs either a verbal or phrasal complement. (...)
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  33. added 2016-04-27
    Geertjan de Vugt (2016). DAVEY, NICHOLAS. Unfinished Worlds: Hermeneutics, Aesthetics and Gadamer. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2013, Viii + 190 Pp., 1 B&W Illus., £70.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):217-219.
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  34. added 2016-04-27
    James W. Mock (2016). CAME, DANIEL, Ed. Nietzsche on Art and Life. Oxford University Press, 2014, 255 Pp., $74.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):210-212.
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  35. added 2016-04-27
    Tom Hanauer (2016). Sublimity and the Ends of Reason: Questions for Deligiorgi. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):195-199.
    The sublime has come under severe criticism in recent years. Jane Forsey, for instance, has argued that all theories of the sublime “rest on a mistake”. In her article, “The Pleasures of Contra-purposiveness: Kant, the Sublime, and Being Human,” Katerina Deligiorgi () provides a rejoinder to Forsey. Deligiorgi argues—with the help of Kant—that a coherent theory of the sublime is possible, and she provides a sketch for such a theory. Deligiorgi makes good progress in the debate over the sublime. But (...)
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  36. added 2016-04-27
    Alan H. Goldman (2016). Walton, Kendall. In Other Shoes: Music, Metaphor, Empathy, Existence. Oxford University Press, 2015, 295 Pp., $29.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):203-205.
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  37. added 2016-04-27
    David Egan (2016). HARRISON, BERNARD What Is Fiction For? Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press, 2015, Xxvi + 593 Pp., $85.00 Cloth, $35.00 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):212-215.
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  38. added 2016-04-27
    David Friedell (2016). Abstract Creationism and Authorial Intention. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):129-137.
    creationism about fictional characters is the view that fictional characters are abstract objects that authors create. I defend this view against criticisms from Stuart Brock that hitherto have not been adequately countered. The discussion sheds light on how the number of fictional characters depends on authorial intention. I conclude also that we should change how we think intentions are connected to artifacts more generally, both abstract and concrete.
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  39. added 2016-04-27
    Jennifer Judkins (2016). LEVINSON, JERROLD. Musical Concerns: Essays in Philosophy of Music. Oxford University Press, 2015, Viii + 173 Pp., $45.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):205-206.
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  40. added 2016-04-27
    Kristin Boyce (2016). LEAR, JONATHAN. A Case for Irony. Harvard University Press, 2011, 210 Pp., $33.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):208-210.
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  41. added 2016-04-27
    Ming Dong Gu (2016). Patterns of Tao : The Birth of Chinese Writing and Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):151-163.
    In the Chinese tradition, the relationship between art and philosophy is conceptually explored in terms of the relationship between dao and wen, which may respectively be viewed as representing philosophy and art. Over history, discourses on dao 道 and wen 文 are central to studies of Chinese literature, art, culture, and civilization. But just as dao holds a range of ideas in Chinese philosophy, wen is also one of the most complex terms in Chinese tradition, whose denotations and connotations are (...)
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  42. added 2016-04-27
    Jon Robson & Aaron Meskin (2016). Video Games as Self‐Involving Interactive Fictions. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):165-177.
    This article explores the nature and theoretical import of a hitherto neglected class of fictions which we term ‘self-involving interactive fictions’. SIIFs are interactive fictions, but they differ from standard examples of interactive fictions by being, in some important sense, about those who consume them. In order to better understand the nature of SIIFs, and the ways in which they differ from other fictions, we focus primarily on the most prominent example of the category: video-game fictions. We argue that appreciating (...)
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  43. added 2016-04-27
    Brent Kalar (2016). Peters, Julia. Hegel on Beauty. New York: Routledge, 2015, 161 Pp., $145.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):215-217.
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  44. added 2016-04-27
    David Egan (2016). Literature and Thought Experiments. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):139-150.
    Like works of literature, thought experiments present fictional narratives that prompt reflection in their readers. Because of these and other similarities, a number of philosophers have argued for a strong analogy between works of literary fiction and thought experiments, some going so far as to say that works of literary fiction are a species of thought experiment. These arguments are often used in defending a cognitivist position with regard to literature: thought experiments produce knowledge, so works of literary fiction can (...)
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  45. added 2016-04-27
    P. D. Magnus (2016). Kind of Borrowed, Kind of Blue. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):179-185.
    In late 2014, the jazz combo Mostly Other People Do the Killing released Blue—an album that is a note-for-note remake of Miles Davis's 1959 landmark album Kind of Blue. This is a thought experiment made concrete, raising metaphysical puzzles familiar from discussion of indiscernible counterparts. It is an actual album, rather than merely a concept, and so poses the aesthetic puzzle of why one would ever actually listen to it.
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  46. added 2016-04-27
    John Gibson (2016). YABLO, STEPHEN. Aboutness. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press, 2014, Xi + 221 Pp., $45.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):206-208.
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  47. added 2016-04-27
    Katerina Deligiorgi (2016). Finite Agents, Sublime Feelings: Response to Hanauer. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):199-202.
    Tom Hanauer's thoughtful discussion of my article “The Pleasures of Contra-purposiveness: Kant, the Sublime, and Being Human” puts pressure on two important issues concerning the affective phenomenology of the sublime. My aim in that article was to present an analysis of the sublime that does not suffer from the problems identified by Jane Forsey in “Is a Theory of the Sublime Possible?”. I argued that Kant's notion of reflective judgment can help with this task, because it allows us to (...)
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  48. added 2016-04-27
    Machiel Keestra (2014). Conflict & Compassie: een hedendaagse blik op Wagner en een wagneriaanse blik op onszelf. In Rutger Helmers & Philip Westbroek (eds.), Conflict en compassie. 200 jaar Richard Wagner. Nationale Opera & Ballet 157-166.
    (text in Dutch) Mediated by the so-called Dream-organ ('Traumorgan') which opera composer Richard Wagner mentions in his writings, the author engages in a fictitious dialogue with Wagner. Their dialogue focuses on a few topics related to the conference theme 'Conflict and compassion' that were of concern to Wagner in his days and which have undergone some serious changes since his death. The author discusses with Wagner the 'death of tragedy', sexuality and desire after the sexual revolution, the attractivity of (...)
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  49. added 2016-04-26
    Stephanie Adair (forthcoming). The Modality of Artistic Objects. Axiomathes:1-13.
    Nicolai Hartmann describes how artistic objects arise through the interplay between a material foreground and immaterial background. In this paper, I show how the layered structure also prevents the modal imbalance inherent in artistic objects from violating the intermodal laws of the real. The real law of intermodal implication specifies that real possibility cannot extend beyond real necessity. I begin by explicating the real intermodal laws and describing how they give the real sphere its characteristic narrowness and determinateness. Hartmann describes (...)
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  50. added 2016-04-26
    Christoph Baumberger (2014). Gebaute Zeichen. Zu den Bedeutungsweisen von Bauwerken. In Jörg H. Gleiter (ed.), Symptom Design. Vom Zeigen und Sich-Zeigen der Dinge. Transkript 93-113.
    Architekturkritiker und -historiker verwenden eine Vielzahl von Ausdrücken, um anzugeben, was Bauwerke bedeuten. Es ist beispielsweise die Rede davon, dass sie etwas ausdrücken, repräsentieren, zitieren, manifestieren, darstellen oder aussagen; man kann von Gebäuden lesen, die mehrdeutig sind, als Metaphern fungieren oder auf etwas anspielen. In diesem Aufsatz frage ich, wie Bauwerke bedeuten können, um die Grundzüge einer Theorie der Bedeutungsweisen von Bauwerken und ihren Teilen vorzustellen, die als Rahmen für Einzelanalysen und historische Untersuchungen verwendet werden kann. Anstatt die meist unklaren (...)
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