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Aesthetics

Edited by Rafael De Clercq (Lingnan University)
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  1. added 2014-11-26
    Valeria Giardino & Gabriel Greenberg (forthcoming). Introduction: Varieties of Iconicity. Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-25.
    This introduction aims to familiarize readers with basic dimensions of variation among pictorial and diagrammatic representations, as we understand them, in order to serve as a backdrop to the articles in this volume. Instead of trying to canvas the vast range of representational kinds, we focus on a few important axes of difference, and a small handful of illustrative examples. We begin in Section 1 with background: the distinction between pictures and diagrams, the concept of systems of representation, and that (...)
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  2. added 2014-11-26
    Mark Dingemanse (2014). Making New Ideophones in Siwu: Creative Depiction in Conversation. Pragmatics and Society 5 (3):384-405.
    Ideophones are found in many of the world’s languages. Though they are a major word class on a par with nouns and verbs, their origins are ill-understood, and the question of ideophone creation has been a source of controversy. This paper studies ideophone creation in naturally occurring speech. New, unconventionalised ideophones are identified using native speaker judgements, and are studied in context to understand the rules and regularities underlying their production and interpretation. People produce and interpret new ideophones with the (...)
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  3. added 2014-11-26
    Derek Matravers & Damien Freeman (2014). Figuring Out Figurative Art: Contemporary Philosophers on Contemporary Paintings. Routledge.
    In 1797 Friedrich Schlegel wrote that "philosophy of art usually lacks one of two things: either the philosophy, or the art." This collection of essays contains both the philosophy and the art. It brings together an international team of leading philosophers to address diverse philosophical issues raised by recent works of art. Each essay engages with a specific artwork and explores the connection between the image and the philosophical content. Thirteen contemporary philosophers demonstrate how philosophy can aid interpretation of the (...)
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  4. added 2014-11-26
    Katerina Bantinaki (2014). What is a Picture? Depiction, Realism, Abstraction, by Michael Newall. Mind 123 (491):944-947.
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  5. added 2014-11-20
    Sebastian Gardner (2014). Method and Metaphysics in the Philosophy of Art. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (New Series: 7) (2):230-253.
    This article is concerned with the question of the proper place of substantial general metaphysics in aesthetics and the philosophy of art. For reasons articulated in writings from the 1950s, analytic aesthetics denies that there is any relation of dependence and regards the intrusion of metaphysics into reflection on art as not merely superfluous but also methodologically inappropriate. Against this I argue (1) that analytic aesthetics in its circumscription of the bounds of the discipline is not metaphysically neutral, (2) that (...)
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  6. added 2014-11-20
    Eileen John (2014). Meals, Art, and Artistic Value. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (New Series: 7) (2):254-268.
    The notion of a meal is explored in relation to questions of art status and artistic value. Meals are argued not to be works of art, but to have the capacity for artistic value. These claims are used to respond to Dominic Lopes’s arguments in Beyond Art that demote artistic value in favour of the values that emerge from specific kinds of art. A conception of artistic value that involves ‘taking reflective charge’ of the possibilities for goodness available in an (...)
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  7. added 2014-11-20
    Václav Magid (2014). Owen Hulatt, Ed., Aesthetic and Artistic Autonomy. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (New Series: 7) (2):290-296.
    A review of Owen Hulatt´s Aesthetic and Artistic Autonomy (London: Bloomsbury, 2013, viii + 243 pp. ISBN 978-1-4411-9652-1).
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  8. added 2014-11-20
    Malcolm Budd (2014). Morality, Society, and the Love of Art. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (New Series: 7) (2):170-207.
    The principal focus of the essay is the idea of artistic value, understood as the value of a work of art as the work of art it is, and the essay explores the connections, if any, between artistic value and a variety of other values (social, moral, educational, and character-building) in human life. I start with a series of observations about social values and then turn to moral values. Beginning from Goethe’s claim that ‘music cannot affect morality, nor can the (...)
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  9. added 2014-11-20
    Jason Gaiger (2014). The Idea of a Universal Bildwissenschaft. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (New Series: 7) (2):208-229.
    The emergence of Bildwissenschaft (image science) as a new interdisciplinary formation that is intended to encompass all images calls for an analysis of the grounds on which the claim to universality can be upheld. I argue that whereas the lifting of scope restrictions imposes only a weak universality requirement, the identification of features that belong to the entire class of entities that are categorized as images imposes a strong universality requirement. Reflection on this issue brings into focus the distinctive character (...)
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  10. added 2014-11-20
    Martin Seel (2014). Active Passivity: On the Aesthetic Variant of Freedom. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (New Series: 7) (2):269-281.
    ‘Being with oneself in the other’ is a well-known formula that Hegel uses to characterize the basic relation of subjective freedom. This phrase points to the fact that subjects can only come to themselves if they remain capable of going beyond themselves. This motif also plays a significant role in Hegel’s philosophy of art. The article further develops this motif by exploring the extent to which this polarity of selfhood and otherhood is also characteristic of states of aesthetic freedom. It (...)
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  11. added 2014-11-20
    Tomáš Koblížek (2014). Carole Maigné, Ed., Formalisme Esthétique: Prague Et Vienne au XIXe Siècle. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (New Series: 7) (2):282-289.
    A review of Carole Maigné´s Formalisme esthétique: Prague et Vienne au XIXe siècle (Paris: Vrin, 2013. 288 pp. ISBN 978-2-7116-2481-2).
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  12. added 2014-11-18
    Jun Chen (2011). Jian Gou Yu Jie Gou: Wen Yi Xue Mei Xue Lun Gao = Construction and Deconstruction: Reflect on Theory of Literature and Art and Aesthetics. She Hui Ke Xue Wen Xian Chu Ban She ;.
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  13. added 2014-11-18
    Angélica Tornero & Lydia Elizalde (eds.) (2011). Imaginarios Del Grotesco: Teorías y Crítica. Universidad Iberoamericana.
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  14. added 2014-11-17
    F. Balke, Bernhard Siegert & Joseph Vogl (eds.) (2012). Mimesis. Wilhelm Fink.
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  15. added 2014-11-17
    Jens Kastner (2012). Der Streit Um den Ästhetischen Blick: Kunst Und Politik Zwischen Pierre Bourdieu Und Jacques Rancière. Turia + Kant.
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  16. added 2014-11-17
    Pedro Karczmarczyk (2007). La subjetivización de la estética y el valor cognitivo del arte según Gadamer. Analogía Filosófica: Revista de Filosofía, Investigación y Difusión (1):127-173.
    En este trabajo analizamos la reivindicación gadameriana del valor cognitivo de arte como un ejemplo de un modo de conocimiento que permite concebir de mejor manera la comprensión que tiene lugar en las ciencias del espíritu. Dicha reivindicación presupone el desconocimiento del valor cognitivo del arte operado por la subjetivización de la estética con Kant y una vuelta a los presupuestos de la tradición humanista. Por ello en la introducción presentamos en esquema los conceptos humanistas de tacto, gusto, sentido común (...)
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  17. added 2014-11-16
    Robert Beckford (2014). Documentary as Exorcism: Resisting the Bewitchment of Colonial Christianity. Bloomsbury.
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  18. added 2014-11-16
    Christian Grüny (2014). Kunst des Übergangs: Philosophische Konstellationen Zur Musik. Velbrück.
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  19. added 2014-11-16
    Lixing Liu (2014). Dang Dai Dian Ying Li Lun Yu Pi Ping =. Wu Nan Tu Shu Chu Ban Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
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  20. added 2014-11-16
    Santiago E. Espinosa (2013). L'inexpressif Musical. Belles Lettres.
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  21. added 2014-11-16
    Xiangde Li (2013). Mei Xue Zhongguo. Shanxi Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  22. added 2014-11-16
    Ursula Brandstätter (2013). Erkenntnis Durch Kunst: Theorie Und Praxis der Ästhetischen Transformation. Böhlau.
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  23. added 2014-11-16
    Jean-Yves Bras (2013). La Troisième Oreille: Pour Une Écoute Active de la Musique. Fayard.
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  24. added 2014-11-16
    Aage Ansgar Hansen-Löve, Brigitte Obermayr & Georg Witte (eds.) (2013). Form Und Wirkung: Phänomenologische Und Empirische Kunstwissenschaft in der Sowjetunion der 1920er Jahre. Wilhelm Fink.
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  25. added 2014-11-16
    Thomas Metscher, Heike Friauf, Thomas J. Richter & Werner Seppmann (eds.) (2013). Ästhetik der Unterwerfung: Das Beispiel Documenta. Laika-Verlag.
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  26. added 2014-11-16
    Hans Heinz Holz (2013). Kunst-Theorien: Kleine Schriften Zur Ästhetik. Aisthesis.
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  27. added 2014-11-16
    Xiujian Li (2013). Dang Dai Zhongguo Mei Xue Xue Shu Shi =. Zhongguo She Hui Ke Xue Chu Ban She.
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  28. added 2014-11-16
    Aliocha Wald Lasowski (2013). Les Larmes Musicales. William Blake.
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  29. added 2014-11-16
    Margarita Ramírez González (2012). Génesis de Una Estética de la Realidad Virtual. Instituto Nacional de Bellas Artes y Literatura.
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  30. added 2014-11-16
    Simon Critchley (2012). Impossible Objects: Interviews. Polity.
    Impossible objects are those about which the philosopher, narrowly conceived, can hardly speak: poetry, film, music, humor. Such "objects" do not rely on philosophy for interpretation and understanding; they are already independent practices and sites of sensuous meaning production. As Elvis Costello has said, "writing about music is like dancing about architecture." We don't need literary theory in order to be riveted by the poem, nor a critic's analysis to enjoy a film. How then can philosophy speak about anything outside (...)
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  31. added 2014-11-14
    Hillel Broder (2014). Attending to the Gesture in Experimental Modernism; or, Reading with(Out) Theory of Mind. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):230-247.
    In his study “Facial Expression Theory from Romanticism to the Present,” Alan Richardson reminds us that “successful social communication” would be greatly impoverished if “we did not have a reasonably reliable and speedy, and therefore largely unconscious, cognitive mechanism for gauging the emotions and intentions of others through reading their faces.”1 This innately sympathetic capacity for “mind-reading”—that is, for interpreting others’ facial expressions as indicative of internal states of mind—is historically termed “Theory of Mind” (ToM) by cognitive psychologists, philosophers, and (...)
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  32. added 2014-11-14
    Tony Jackson (2014). Why the Novel Happened: A Cognitive Explanation. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):75-93.
    In 1987, psychologist Alan Leslie published the essay “Pretense and Representation: The Origins of ‘Theory of Mind.’”1 Even after more than twenty years, this remains a benchmark essay, having been cited over seven hundred times in the PsychINFO database as of summer 2011. “Theory of mind” is the cognitive-psychological term for the human ability to attribute mental states—intentions, desires, emotions—to others. Our social being depends on this ability, which humans demonstrate from infancy, though, of course, it develops as the child (...)
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  33. added 2014-11-14
    Jonathan Wike (2014). Toward the "Coppice Gate": A Reading of Thomas Hardy's "The Darkling Thrush". Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):129-143.
    Thomas Hardy’s great and central poem, “The Darkling Thrush,”1 signals that it is to be read as a response to his precursors. “Darkling” evokes Keats’s “Ode to a Nightingale” and Arnold’s “Dover Beach.” Byron had used “cloudy canopy” to describe Parnassus in Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage. A particularly ambitious signal is “coppice,” a variant of “copse,” a crucial word in Wordsworth’s “Tintern Abbey.”2 “Gate” fixes the coppice at the perceptual threshold, whereas Wordsworth located the copse at the center of the landscape.Wordsworth (...)
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  34. added 2014-11-14
    Anthony Jannotta (2014). Interpretation and Conversation: A Response to Huddleston. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):371-380.
    The conversation argument for actual intentionalism compares our encounters with artworks to conversations to support the interpretive policy that artists’ intentions should constrain our interpretations of their artworks. Andrew Huddleston argues that intentionalists cannot appeal to conversation, because either the metaphor is inapt (since two conversational requirements go unfulfilled) or, if the metaphor is more aptly construed (as a meta-level dialogue between artist and interpreter on how best to interpret the artwork), it will be incompatible with the intentionalist’s interpretive policy. (...)
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  35. added 2014-11-14
    Anna Neill (2014). Marvelous Plasticity and the Fortunes of Species in The Water-Babies. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):162-177.
    Does the writing and reading of fiction affect long-term human social behavior? The question of how imaginative literature has impacted human nature is rather difficult to answer given, of course, the minute period of evolutionary time involved. One way it has been done is by linking creative text to oral storytelling, thereby reverse engineering the function of fiction back to its Pleistocene origins. The adaptive advantages probably conferred by storytelling, as Denis Dutton so eloquently showed, include “low-cost and low-risk surrogate (...)
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  36. added 2014-11-14
    Craig Taylor (2014). Literature and Moral Thought. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):285-298.
    I will consider what literature might add to moral thought and understanding as distinct from moral philosophy as it is commonly understood. My argument turns on a distinction between two conceptions of moral thought. One in which the point of moral thought is that it should issue in moral judgement leading to action; the other in which it is concerned also with what Iris Murdoch calls ‘the texture of a man’s being or the nature of his personal vision’. Drawing on (...)
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  37. added 2014-11-14
    James Carney, Robin Dunbar, Anna Machin & Tamás Dávid-Barrett (2014). Social Psychology and the Comic-Book Superhero: A Darwinian Approach. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):195-215.
    One of the more compelling features of Denis Dutton’s The Art Instinct is its theoretical parsimony. Utilizing what essentially amounts to one explanatory principle—that of Darwinian selection—Dutton advances a theory of aesthetics that is at once general enough to account for cross-cultural variations in artistic production and sufficiently nuanced to promote insights into individual artworks. In doing this, Dutton’s work could not offer a greater contrast to some of the more vocal trends in contemporary aesthetic theory, where ponderous theorizing and (...)
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  38. added 2014-11-14
    Daniel J. Kruger, Maryanne L. Fisher, Sarah L. Strout & Shana’E. Clark (2014). Pride and Prejudice or Family and Flirtation?: Jane Austen's Depiction of Women's Mating Strategies. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):114-128.
    In The Art Instinct, Denis Dutton promoted a theoretical framework that “has more validity, more power, and more possibilities than the hermetic discourse that deadens so much of the humanities.”1 This framework is Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural and sexual selection. Dutton proposed to seek “human universals that underlie the vast cacophony of cultural differences and across the globe” (AI, p. 39), based on a shared, evolved human nature.This contrasts with the relativistic presumptions of those falling under the (...)
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  39. added 2014-11-14
    Paisley Livingston (2014). Bolzano on Beauty. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):269-284.
    This paper sets forth Bolzano’s little-known 1843 account of beauty. Bolzano accepted the thesis that beauty is what rewards contemplation with pleasure. The originality of his proposal lies in his claim that the source of this pleasure is a special kind of cognitive process, namely, the formation of an adequate concept of the object’s attributes through the successful exercise of the observer’s proficiency at obscure and confused cognition. To appreciate this proposal we must understand how Bolzano explicated a number of (...)
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  40. added 2014-11-14
    Julian Dodd (2014). The Possibility of Profound Music. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):299-322.
    Peter Kivy has become convinced that it is impossible for pure, instrumental music to be profound. This is because he takes works of such music to be incapable of meeting what he claims to be two necessary conditions for artistic profundity: that the work denotes something profound, and that the work expresses profound propositions about its profound denotatum. The negative part of this paper argues as follows. Although works of pure, instrumental music do, indeed, fail to meet these conditions, the (...)
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  41. added 2014-11-14
    Michelle Saint (2014). The Paradox of Onstage Emotion. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):357-369.
    I develop a paradox regarding the emotional experiences of theatrical actors, which I call the ‘paradox of onstage emotion’. Many actors tell us that they experience genuine emotions while performing fictional plays: they grow angry, sad, joyful, etc., as befits their characters’ circumstances. Yet, they are not their characters and are not actually in those characters’ circumstances. Intuitively, it would seem those actors cannot have emotions befitting their characters’ circumstances rather than their own. Thus, we face a paradox. After setting (...)
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  42. added 2014-11-14
    Kim Andersen (2014). Kierkegaard, Rorty, and Evolution. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):248-266.
    But I found it more and more difficult, with free scope given to my imagination, to invent evidence which would suffice to convince me. Thus disbelief crept over me at a very slow rate, but was at last complete. The rate was so slow that I felt no distress, and have never since doubted even for a single second that my conclusion was correct.With the publication of On the Origin of Species (1859), Darwin threw a monkey wrench into human self-understanding (...)
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  43. added 2014-11-14
    Patrick Henry (2014). Working with Denis: 1982–2002. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):1-9.
    Sometime during the summer of 1981, I received a note in the mail from Denis Dutton, editor of Philosophy and Literature, stating that, due to severe financial constraints, the University of Michigan was going to drop its sponsorship of the journal. The letter had apparently gone out to all those who had either written for the journal or subscribed to it. I had published a short review of Philip Lewis’s book on La Rochefoucauld in the Fall 1978 issue.My family and (...)
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  44. added 2014-11-14
    Michael Haworth (2014). Genius Is What Happens: Derrida and Kant on Genius, Rule-Following and the Event. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):323-337.
    This essay examines the concept of genius in the work of Jacques Derrida and Immanuel Kant and argues that, despite Derrida’s arguments to the contrary, there is significant space for convergence between the two accounts. This convergence is sought in the complex, paradoxical relationship between the invention of the new and the contextual conditions, or ‘rules’, from which any work of genius must depart but without which no work of genius would be possible. It is my argument that Kant evades (...)
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  45. added 2014-11-14
    Ellen Dissanayake (2014). Denis Dutton: Appreciation of the Man and Discussion of the Work. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):26-40.
    My association with Denis Dutton began almost exactly thirty years ago, at the 1981 American Society for Aesthetics (ASA) conference in Tampa, although in an inverse sort of way: he deliberately chose not to meet me.Let me explain. In late October 1981, I was a housewife living in Sri Lanka who certainly did not have the means to travel from South Asia to central Florida. The previous year, I had published a paper in the summer issue of the Journal of (...)
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  46. added 2014-11-14
    Anthony Lock (2014). Uniting the Sciences and Arts. Philosophy and Literature 38 (1):178-194.
    More than a decade ago, Edward Wilson investigated how to link the sciences and arts in Consilience (1998),1 in which he argues that consilience—the unification of facts—is possible between every subject across the intellectual spectrum. Wilson claims that the sciences, humanities, and arts are linked by reduction from the fine arts, down to the humanities, down, finally, to the natural sciences. For example, René Magritte’s Reckless Sleeper can be understood to be composed of the paints on the canvas, their physical (...)
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  47. added 2014-11-13
    Paisley Livingston (2013). Du Bos' Paradox. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):393-406.
    What is now generally known as the paradox of art and negative affect was identified as a paradox by the Abbé Jean-Baptiste Du Bos in 1719. In his attempt to explain how people can admire and enjoy representational works that ‘afflict’ them, Du Bos claims that such representations give rise to ‘artificial’ emotions, provide a pleasurable relief from boredom, and offer us epistemic, artistic, and moral rewards. The paper delineates Du Bos’ proposal, considers the question of Du Bos’ originality, and (...)
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  48. added 2014-11-07
    John Marmysz (2014). Scotland as a Site of Sacrifice. Film International 12 (2):6-17.
    Friedrich Nietzsche delineates three stages of sacrificial behavior. The first stage consists of the sacrifice of particular human beings to a god. The second stage involves the sacrifice of one’s own instincts to a god, and the third stage culminates in the sacrifice of God himself. This last stage describes the death of God and signals the “final cruelty” of our present times. Our age is the age of nihilism, the point in history during which humans “sacrifice God for the (...)
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  49. added 2014-11-05
    Andrea Sauchelli (forthcoming). The Acquaintance Principle, Aesthetic Judgments, and Conceptual Art. Journal of Aesthetic Education.
    The Acquaintance Principle is the principle according to which judgements concerning the aesthetic value of a work of art proffered by a critic must be based on the critic’s experience(s) of acquaintance with the work itself. The possible exception to this principle would be experiences obtained through other means of transmissibility, related in a particular way to the work in question, that can eventually provide the critic with an adequate basis for judging the artwork. However, recent philosophers claimed that some (...)
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  50. added 2014-11-05
    Scott Walden (2014). Transparency and Photographic Contact. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (4):365-378.
    Kendall Walton famously argues that photographic images—in contrast with handmade images—are transparent; we see through them to the persons or objects that were in front of the camera at the moment of exposure. Walton also argues, separately, that our philosophical investigations in the representational arts generally should adopt the methodology of theory construction. This article brings together these two strands of Walton's thought by rendering his argument for photographic transparency in the form of a theory consisting of a perceptual natural (...)
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