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Aesthetics

Edited by Rafael De Clercq (Lingnan University)
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  1. added 2016-06-25
    Mikael Pettersson (forthcoming). Capturing Shadows: On Photography, Causation, and Absences. Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-14.
    ABSTRACTMany photographs seem to be images of absences: for instance, a photograph of a shadow seems to be an image of an absence, as shadows are plausibly thought of as being absences of light. Absence photography is puzzling, however, as, first, it is a common idea that photographs can only be images of things that have caused them, and, second, it is unclear whether absences can cause anything. In this paper, I look at various ways to unravel the puzzle. Along (...)
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  2. added 2016-06-24
    Jack Wadham (forthcoming). The Philosophy of Perception: Phenomenology and Image Theory. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayv011.
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  3. added 2016-06-24
    Michel-Antoine Xhignesse (forthcoming). The Trouble with Poetic Licence. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayv053.
    It is commonly thought that authors can make anything whatsoever true in their fictions by artistic fiat. Harry Deutsch originally called this position the Principle of Poetic License. If true, PPL sets an important constraint on accounts of fictional truth: they must be such as to allow that, for any x, one can write a story in which it is true that x. I argue that PPL is far too strong: it requires us to abandon the law of non-contradiction and (...)
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  4. added 2016-06-23
    Peter H. Karlen (2016). Humor and Enlightenment, Part II: The Theory Applied. Contemporary Aesthetics 14.
    Part I of this article advanced a new theory of humor, the Enlightenment Theory, while contrasting it with other main theories, including the Incongruity, Repression/Relief/Release, and Superiority Theories. The Enlightenment Theory does not contradict these other theories but rather subsumes them. As argued, each of the other theories cannot account for all the aspects of humor explained by the Enlightenment Theory. Part II shows how the Enlightenment Theory meets challenging issues in humor theory where other theories falter, including failed humor, (...)
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  5. added 2016-06-22
    Katherine Tullmann (forthcoming). Sympathy & Fascination. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayw003.
    Why do we form strong emotional attachments to unlikeable and immoral characters during our engagements with fictions? These pro-attitudes persist even as we realize that we would loathe these people if we were to encounter them in real-life. In this paper, I explore the implications of the sympathy for the devil phenomenon. I begin by considering several popular explanations, including simulation, aesthetic distancing, pre-focusing, and the ‘best of all characters’. I conclude that each one is inadequate. I then propose my (...)
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  6. added 2016-06-22
    Yves Laberge (forthcoming). Photographic Theory: An Historical Anthology. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayu094.
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  7. added 2016-06-22
    Peter H. Karlen (2016). Humor and Enlightenment, Part I: The Theory. Contemporary Aesthetics 14.
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  8. added 2016-06-22
    Gilbert Plumer (2016). Argumentatively Evil Storytelling. In D. Mohammend & M. Lewinski (eds.), Argumentation and Reasoned Action: Proceedings of the 1st European Conference on Argumentation, Lisbon 2015, Vol. 1. College Publications 615-630.
    What can make storytelling “evil” in the sense that the storytelling leads to accepting a view for no good reason, thus allowing ill-reasoned action? I mean the storytelling can be argumentatively evil, not trivially that (e.g.) the overt speeches of characters can include bad arguments. The storytelling can be argumentatively evil in that it purveys false premises, or purveys reasoning that is formally or informally fallacious. My main thesis is that as a rule, the shorter the fictional narrative, the greater (...)
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  9. added 2016-06-19
    Solveig Aasen (forthcoming). Visibility Constraints in Depiction: Objects Experienced Versus Objects Depicted. Philosophical Quarterly.
    It is widely accepted that pictures can only depict visible things. The paper criticises this ‘visibility constraint’ on the objects of depiction. The constraint is shown to imply that the range of visibilia is settled prior to an investigation of what can be seen in pictures. By contrast to this, I suggest that settling what can be seen in pictures is relevant to settling the range of visibilia. It is what we experience in pictures, and not the objects of depiction, (...)
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  10. added 2016-06-19
    A. Brunneis (2015). The Boulevards of Extinction. Wipf and Stock.
    In over 600 aphorisms, essays, parables, and dialogues, the author attempts to engage the long tradition of modern literary philosophy. Though richly represented by a host of notable figures—Montaigne, Pascal, Voltaire, the Jena Circle, Kierkegaard, Emerson, Nietzsche, and Cioran, to name a few—this style of thinking has fallen into abeyance since the mid-twentieth century. It is hoped that this book will play a small role in helping to reinvigorate the genre. Inspired by the work of Joshua Foa Dienstag, the author (...)
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  11. added 2016-06-18
    Shen-yi Liao & Aaron Meskin (forthcoming). Morality and Aesthetics of Food. In Anne Barnhill, Mark Budolfson & Tyler Doggett (eds.), The Oxford Handbook on Food Ethics. Oxford University Press
    We explore the interaction between moral and aesthetic values of food, in part by connecting it to existing discussions of the interaction between moral and aesthetic values of art. Along the way, we consider the artistic status of food, the aesthetic value of food, and the role of expertise in uncovering aesthetic value. Ultimately we argue for the position of food immoralism. We conclude by drawing out broader implications of this position for discussions on the ethics of food and discussions (...)
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  12. added 2016-06-17
    Ray Scott Percival (2016). Does the New Classicism Need Evolutionary Theory? In Elizabeth Millán (ed.), After the Avant-Gardes: Reflections on the Future of the Fine Arts. 109 - 125.
    Drawing on work on modularity of mind and evolutionary psychology, I explore how evolutionary theory may support a return to classical artistic standards (the new classicism). At the same time, I argue for much that is admirable in the avant garde. I connect this question to the theory of epistemology and aesthetic biases, suggesting that aesthetics embody evolved knowledge.
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  13. added 2016-06-17
    M. Blake Wilson (2016). Behind Zarathustra's Eyes: The Bad, Sad Man Meets Nietzsche's Prophet. In Rocco Gennaro & Casey Harison (eds.), The Who and Philosophy. Lexington Books
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  14. added 2016-06-16
    Matthew Baddorf (forthcoming). An Argument From Divine Beauty Against Divine Simplicity. Topoi:1-8.
    Some versions of the doctrine of divine simplicity imply that God lacks really differentiated parts. I present a new argument against these views based on divine beauty. The argument proceeds as follows: God is beautiful. If God is beautiful, then this beauty arises from some structure. If God’s beauty arises from a structure, then God possesses really differentiated parts. If these premises are true, then divine simplicity is false. I argue for each of the argument’s premises and defend it against (...)
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  15. added 2016-06-16
    Becky Vartabedian (2008). Special Effects, Special Status: Lie, Visual Effects, and Stephen Prince's Perceptual Realism. Cinemascope 10.
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  16. added 2016-06-15
    Fabian Dorsch (2011). The Aesthetic Relevance of Empirical Findings. Kongress-Akten der Deutschen Gesellschaft Für Ästhetik 2:1-21.
    Empirical findings may be relevant for aesthetic evaluation in at least two ways. First — within criticism — they may help us to identify the aesthetic value of objects. Second— whithin philosophy — they may help us to decide which theory of aesthetic value and evaluation to prefer. In this paper, I address both kinds of relevance. My focus is thereby on empirical evidence gathered, not by means of first-personal experiences, but by means of third-personal scientific investigations of individual artworks (...)
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  17. added 2016-06-14
    Fabian Dorsch (2014). The Limits of Aesthetic Empiricism. In Gregory Currie, Matthew Kieran, Aaron Meskin & Jon Robson (eds.), Aesthetics and the Sciences of Mind. Oxford University Press 75-100.
    Empirical findings may be relevant for aesthetic evaluation in at least two ways. First ‒‒ within criticism ‒ they may help us to identify the aesthetic value of objects. Second ‒ whithin philosophy ‒ they may help us to decide which theory of aesthetic value and evaluation to prefer. In this paper, I address both kinds of relevance. My focus is thereby on empirical evidence gathered, not by means of first-personal experiences, but by means of third-personal scientific investigations of individual (...)
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  18. added 2016-06-14
    Fabian Dorsch (2012). Editorial. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aestetics 49 (1):3-4.
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  19. added 2016-06-13
    Lars Spuybroek (forthcoming). The Compass of Beauty: A Search for the Middle. In Maria Voyatzaki (ed.), Architectural Materialisms: Nonhuman Creativity. Edinburgh University Press
    This chapter is a rethinking of my earlier “The Ages of Beauty” which investigated Charles Hartshorne’s Diagram of Aesthetic Values. The argument is placed in a long history of beauty being considered as the middle between extremes. It slowly develops into a structure not merely of aesthetic experience but of existence itself, making it a competitor of Heidegger’s fourfold.
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  20. added 2016-06-13
    Samuel Stoner (2016). Bradley Murray, The Possibility of Culture: Pleasure and Moral Development in Kant’s Aesthetics Malden, MA: Wiley-Blackwell, 2015 Pp. 160 9781118950654 $99.95. [REVIEW] Kantian Review 21 (2):340-342.
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  21. added 2016-06-10
    Lars Spuybroek (forthcoming). Gothic Ontology and Sympathy: Moving Away From the Fold. In Sjoerd Van Tuinen (ed.), Speculative Art Histories. Edinburgh University Press
    This transcription of a keynote for the Speculative Art Histories conference in May 2013 is a mixture of the main argument of The Sympathy of Things and some new insights. The text might be helpful for those who have not read the Sympathy book, which has been sold out for a number of years. This essay will appear as a chapter in Sjoerd van Tuinen's Speculative Art Histories, to be published with Edinburgh University Press in 2017.
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  22. added 2016-06-08
    Chrysanthos Voutounos & Andreas Lanitis (forthcoming). A Cultural Semiotic Aesthetic Approach for a Virtual Heritage Project in Advance. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology.
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  23. added 2016-06-06
    John Powell (2013). The Artful Species: Aesthetics, Art, and Evolution, by Stephen Davies (2013). Literature & Aesthetics:111-118.
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  24. added 2016-06-06
    John Powell, Time, Music, and Gardens. Philosophy and Music Conference.
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  25. added 2016-06-06
    John Powell (2012). We Do Not Have An Adequate Conception of Art Until We Have One That Accommodates Gardens. Dissertation, Victoria University of Wellington
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  26. added 2016-06-06
    Ismay Barwell & John Powell (2010). Gardens, Music, and Time. In Dan O'Brien (ed.), Gardening: Cultivating Wisdom.
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  27. added 2016-06-04
    Aiste Celkyte, Ancient Aesthetics. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This entry is a comprehensive study of ancient Greek and Roman aesthetic theories. The history of ancient aesthetics covers centuries, and during this time numerous nuanced arguments and positions were developed. In terms of theories of beauty it is possible to classify the theories into three distinct groups: those that attribute the origin of beauty to proportion, those that attribute it to functionality and those that attribute the Form as the cause of beauty. Ancient philosophers were also the authors of (...)
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  28. added 2016-06-04
    Cynthia R. Nielsen (2016). Gadamer on the Event of Art, the Other, and a Gesture Toward a Gadamerian Approach to Free Jazz". Journal of Applied Hermeneutics:online.
    Several prominent contemporary philosophers, including Jürgen Habermas, John Caputo, and Robert Bernasconi, have at times painted a somewhat negative picture of Gadamer as not only an uncritical traditionalist, but also as one whose philosophical project fails to appreciate difference. Against such claims, I argue that Gadamer’s reflections on art exhibit a genuine appreciation for alterity not unrelated to his hermeneutical approach to the other. Thus, by bringing Gadamer’s reflections on our experience of art into conversation with key aspects of his (...)
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  29. added 2016-06-03
    Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2016). Review of Terry Eagleton's On Evil. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (March (3)):383-385.
    Terry Eagleton has been reviewed in the light of theism; especially Christianity which he had earlier disowned.
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  30. added 2016-06-03
    Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2016). Claiming the Domain of the Literary: Mourning the Death of Reading Fiction. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (June (6)):505-11.
    This essay reviews the domain of the literary contrasting it with other intellectual discourses; especially philosophy. It establishes the superiority of literature over philosophy. And mentions the philosophies informing literature. The essay is written consciously with copious footnotes, contrary to current ways of writing. The essay proper is simple; the footnotes often mock jargon and mimic pedantry.
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  31. added 2016-05-31
    Sonia Sedivy (2004). Wittgenstein Against Interpretation: "the Meaning of a Text Does Not Stop Short of its Facts". In John Gibson Wolfgang Huemer (ed.), The Literary Wittgenstein. Routledge 165-185.
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  32. added 2016-05-30
    James Stillwaggon (2016). The Indirection of Influence: Poetics and Pedagogy in Aristotle and Plato. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):8-25.
    Transmitting knowledge or skills from one person or group to another has traditionally been understood as a merely proximate goal of education, the ultimate end being the lives students spend in pursuit of those learned ideals that keep our societies’ traditions alive. It is only by the life lived by the educated person or the collective life shared by an educated society that any account of educational success could properly be taken.1 Beliefs, attitudes, and habits appropriate to the society for (...)
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  33. added 2016-05-30
    Jeffrey Petts (2016). The Cultural Promise of The Aesthetic by Monique Roelofs. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):119-123.
    The central claim of Monique Roelofs’s wide-ranging examination of the aesthetic is that it “hold[s] out the promise of a shared culture... people and objects [connected] in flourishing collective and material bonds”. Roelofs acknowledges Kant’s and Hume’s commitment to shared human faculties that allow judgements of taste “to attain intersubjective validity”; but her argument quickly develops from this “promise” to one with social and political consequences—of a harmonious and egalitarian society—and to radically different theoretical formulations and conclusions. Roelofs then also (...)
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  34. added 2016-05-30
    Angelo Caranfa (2016). Learning to See: Art, Beauty, and the Joy of Creation in Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):84-103.
    Education takes for granted that sight is there but that it isn’t turned the right way.A work of art... provokes in us... an image, which in our souls awakes surprise—sometimes, meditation—often, and always, the joy of creation.To place oneself in the path of beauty is the basic impulse underlying education.In The Aims of Education, Alfred North Whitehead claims that the goal of education is to cultivate an “aesthetic sense of realized perfection”1—namely, to instruct us in the way of the beautiful. (...)
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  35. added 2016-05-30
    Robert R. Clewis (2016). What's the Big Idea?: On Emily Brady's Sublime. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):104-118.
    “The sublime is a massive concept,” Emily Brady states in her book’s first sentence. Her lucid study of the sublime should interest scholars from a wide range of disciplines, from environmental philosophy and aesthetics to the history of philosophy, art history, and literary criticism. Although its title refers to modern philosophy, the book examines not only the period typically classified in philosophy as “modern,” but also romanticism and contemporary aesthetics. Brady aims “to reassess, and to some extent reclaim, the meaning (...)
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  36. added 2016-05-30
    Tim Prentki (2016). Citizen Artists and Human Becomings. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):72-83.
    Quince: Bless thee, Bottom, bless thee! Thou art translated.Yet it can happen suddenly, unexpectedly, and most frequently in the half-light-of-glimpses, that we catch sight of another visible order which intersects with ours and has nothing to do with it.This article is a reflection on the process of transformation: whether that be a change of the physical kind undergone by Bottom through the acquisition of a donkey’s head or the inner alteration wrought by a moment of heightened perception of the type (...)
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  37. added 2016-05-30
    Gary Kemp (2016). Science Versus the Humanities: Hyman on Wollheim on Depiction. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):1-7.
    In the seventh chapter of his extraordinary book The Objective Eye, John Hyman offers various criticisms of Richard Wollheim’s theory of pictorial depiction.1 My immediate purpose in this short piece is to make the case that these criticisms fail. By no means do I claim that there are not other criticisms to be made against Wollheim’s theory or that Hymans’s book as a whole fails—not in its overarching attempt to rescue the objectivity of art from subjectivist views or, more narrowly, (...)
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  38. added 2016-05-30
    Alexey Aliyev (2016). Unfit to Print: Contra Mag Uidhir on the Ontology of Photographic Artworks. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):3-13.
    According to the orthodox view, photographic artworks are abstract objects. This view, however, has recently been challenged by Christy Mag Uidhir. In his article ‘Photographic Art: An Ontology Fit to Print’, he argues in favour of a nominalist construal of photographic artworks. My goal is to show that Mag Uidhir’s argument is unpersuasive.
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  39. added 2016-05-30
    Tyson E. Lewis (2016). The Pedagogical Function of Art as Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):57-71.
    Today, art and education have precarious statuses. Arts programs are being cut from the curriculum at an alarming rate. While the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 acknowledged the arts as a core academic subject, the arts were quickly eclipsed by the push toward quantifiable improvements on standardized tests. How should art educators respond to this urgent situation? While some might retreat back to an art-for-art’s-sake perspective, others find new justifications for the arts through the discourses of high-stakes testing (...)
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  40. added 2016-05-30
    Chris Perricone (2016). Aesthetic Quality: A Darwinian View. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):45-56.
    Je sais que la poesie est indepensable, mais je ne sais pas a quoi. [I know poetry is indispensable, but I don’t know what for.]A crucial characteristic of any aesthetic education is to understand the nature of aesthetic quality, that is, how to determine whether one artwork is superior to another. For example, I want to say that J. S. Bach’s Sixth Suite for Unaccompanied Cello performed by YoYo Ma is superior to “Thriller,” composed by Rod Temperton and performed by (...)
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  41. added 2016-05-30
    Gianluca Consoli (2016). In Search of the Ontological Common Core of Artworks: Radical Embodiment and Non-Universalization. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):14-41.
    I propose that artworks represent a specific and homogeneous ontological kind, grounded in a common ontological core. I call this common core ‘non-universalizable embodied meaning’, and I argue that this common core explains how artworks unfold their ontological identity at the physical, intentional, and social levels on the basis of an original and irreducible mode of material embodiment and cultural emergence; this common core functions as the constitutive rule of art and institutes an axiological normativity, that is, normativity based on (...)
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  42. added 2016-05-30
    Troy Jollimore (2016). John Gibson, Ed., The Philosophy of Poetry. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):100-110.
    A review of John Gibson´s The Philosophy of Poetry.
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  43. added 2016-05-30
    Akos Krassoy (2016). The Ethics of the Face in Art: On the Margins of Levinas’s Theory of Ethical Signification in Art. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):42-73.
    In ‘Reality and Its Shadow’, Levinas dismisses knowledge as a whole from art. This has deep implications for the ethical. The aesthetic event has nothing to do with the ethical event – art does not seem to hold a place for ethical knowledge. This situation is problematic with respect to the conflicting phenomenological evidence as well as with respect to Levinas himself, who occasionally relies on works of art in his ethical phenomenological analyses. My article aims to fill in the (...)
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  44. added 2016-05-30
    Howard Cannatella (2016). Building Public Confidence in Arts Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):26-44.
    There is a really big, complicated educational question that sometimes we hear and that always needs addressing, rebuffing, monitoring, and advancing but this is never going to be the last word on the matter because many things can transform it: the claim that no student should graduate from his or her high school without an understanding of what art is.Lots of people express this sentiment but in different ways. The statement could not be any clearer in its purpose. It is (...)
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  45. added 2016-05-30
    Giulia Martina (2016). Pictorial Aesthetics and Two Kinds of Inflected Seeing-In. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):74-92.
    Inflected seeing-in is a special experience of the vehicle and subject of a picture, which are experienced as related to each other. Bence Nanay recently defended the idea that inflected picture perception is central to the aesthetic appreciation of pictures. Here I critically discuss his characterization of inflection, and advance a new one, that better accounts for the structure and content of inflected experience in terms of properties of the pictures themselves and also clarifies the distinctive contribution of inflection to (...)
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  46. added 2016-05-27
    Sonia Sedivy (2016). Beauty and The End of Art, Wittgenstein, Plurality and Perception. Bloomsbury.
  47. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). Kantian and Nietzschean Aesthetics of Human Nature: A Comparison Between the Beautiful/Sublime and Apollonian/Dionysian Dualities. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):166-217.
    Both for Kant and for Nietzsche, aesthetics must not be considered as a systematic science based merely on logical premises but rather as a set of intuitively attained artistic ideas that constitute or reconstitute the sensible perceptions and supersensible representations into a new whole. Kantian and Nietzschean aesthetics are both aiming to see beyond the forms of objects to provide explanations for the nobility and sublimity of human art and life. We can safely say that Kant and Nietzsche used the (...)
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  48. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):218-237.
    Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis (...)
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  49. added 2016-05-23
    Gemma Arguello Manresa (2016). La Paradoja del Suspenso Anómalo. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 68:49-65.
    Resumen: En este trabajo se aborda lo que en los debates recientes de filosofía del cine se ha denominado la paradoja del suspenso. Esta paradoja radica en el problema de que algunos espectadores sienten suspenso frente a una narración que ya conocían, partiendo del presupuesto de que la incertidumbre es un estado cognitivo necesario para sentir esta emoción. Se analizan varias propuestas recientes y se ofrece una alternativa a la mismas en la que se recupera la simpatía y la anticipación (...)
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  50. added 2016-05-23
    Gemma Arguello Manresa (2015). Arte de apropiación. Reconsideraciones alrededor del problema de los indiscernibles en Danto. Páginas de Filosofía 16 (19):80-95.
    Resumen: En este trabajo se desarrollan los argumentos que Arthur Danto elaboró en torno al significado metafórico y el estilo con el objetivo de mostrar si es posible que su modelo permita comprender nuevas formas de Arte de Apropiación. Éstas engloban las prácticas recientes en las que los artistas hacen réplicas más o menos exactas de otras obras que han sido importantes en la historia del arte. -/- Abstract: In this paper Arthur Danto’s arguments about metaphorical meaning and style are (...)
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