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Aesthetics

Edited by Rafael De Clercq (Lingnan University)
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  1. added 2014-08-13
    Julian Dodd (forthcoming). On a Proposed Test for Artistic Value. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayu028.
    In a recent paper, Robert Stecker proposes the following test for whether a value possessed by an artwork is artistic or not: ‘Does one need to understand the work to appreciate its being valuable in that way? If so, it is an artistic value. If not, it is not.’ An important question here is what Stecker means by ‘appreciation’ in this context. Stecker himself says little about this, but I offer him two accounts of the nature of appreciation, both of (...)
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  2. added 2014-08-11
    Daniel Nolan & Alexander Sandgren (forthcoming). Creationism and Cardinality. Analysis.
    Creationism about fictional entities requires a principle connecting what fictions say exist with which fictional entities really exist. The most natural way of spelling out such a principle yields inconsistent verdicts about how many fictional entities are generated by certain inconsistent fictions. Avoiding inconsistency without compromising the attractions of creationism will not be easy.
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  3. added 2014-08-11
    James Andow (forthcoming). A Semantic Solution to the Problem with Aesthetic Testimony. Acta Analytica.
    There is something peculiar about aesthetic testimony. It seems more difficult to gain knowledge of aesthetic properties based solely upon aesthetic testimony than it is in the case of other types of property. In this paper, I argue that we can provide an adequate explanation at the level of the semantics of aesthetic language, without defending any substantive thesis in epistemology or about aesthetic value/judgement. If aesthetic predicates are given a non-invariantist semantics, we can explain the supposed peculiar difficulty with (...)
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  4. added 2014-08-11
    M. Steenhagen (forthcoming). Sehen lassen: Die Praxis des Zeigens. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayu016.
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  5. added 2014-08-11
    Martina Sauer (2014-03-15). Lambert Wiesing, Sehen lassen. Die Praxis des Zeigens, Berlin 2013. [REVIEW] Sehepunkte. Rezensionsjournal für Geschichtswissenschaften 14 (3).
  6. added 2014-08-09
    Derek Allan (2104). André Malraux. In Michael Kelly (ed.), Encyclopedia of Aesthetics. 2nd edition (Oxford University Press). 239-243 (Vol 4).
    An overview of Malraux's theory of art, with sub-headings: "Basic Principles","The Creative Process","The Emergence of 'Art'","Art and Time", "The Modern Universal World of Art", and "Critical Responses". Includes a brief discussion of the musée imaginaire.
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  7. added 2014-08-07
    O. Corry (forthcoming). Models as Make-Believe: Imagination, Fiction and Scientific Representation. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayu017.
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  8. added 2014-08-07
    Fiora Salis, Entidades Ficcionais. Compêndio Em Linha de Problemas de Filosofia Analítica.
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  9. added 2014-08-07
    Simon Fokt (2014). Andina, Tiziana: The Philosophy of Art: The Question of Definition: From Hegel to Post-Dantian Theories, 2013. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):ayu018.
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  10. added 2014-08-03
    Andy Kesson (forthcoming). Was Comedy a Genre in English Early Modern Drama? British Journal of Aesthetics:ayu035.
    This article considers the changing pressures of genre on early modern plays and playwrights. The permanent London theatres of this time enjoyed only a brief cultural life (c. 1570s–1640s) but, despite this brevity, produced radical changes in the commercial, creative and aesthetic implications of genre. The article begins with the Shakespeare First Folio which, relatively late in this period (1623), set out three genres in the form of a list across its title page: Mr. WILLIAMSHAKESPEARESCOMEDIES,HISTORIES, &TRAGEDIESThis triad has been taken (...)
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  11. added 2014-08-03
    Claire Elizabeth McEachern (2014). Two Loves I Have: Of Comfort and Despair in Shakespearean Genre. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):191-211.
    A consideration of the differences between Shakespearean comedy and tragedy in light of the historically particular inflection of dramatic irony in the English Reformation. The essay compares classical and humanist understandings of literary response and then proposes that we consider that response as a function of knowledge with respect to (and hence feelings about) a protagonist and his plight. The essay compares the structures of suspense in Sophocles’ and Seneca’s Oedipus plays, and then goes on to examine the ways in (...)
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  12. added 2014-08-03
    Noël Carroll (2014). Ethics and Comic Amusement. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):241-253.
    This article explores several views on the relation of humour, especially tendentious humour, to morality, including comic amoralism, comic ethicism, comic immoralism, and moderate comic moralism. The essay concludes by defending moderate comic moralism.
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  13. added 2014-08-03
    James R. Hamilton (2014). Notes on the Experience of Tragedy. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):255-265.
    Gregory Currie offers a statement of an interesting problem about tragedy: ‘(1) We want the fiction be such that something, E, occurs in it; [yet] (2) we react in ways which make it tempting to say we want E not to occur.’ He argues for one way to make (2) more precise with regard to what it is we are tempted to say. I argue he should not so readily have accepted (1). More significantly, however, I argue both that Currie (...)
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  14. added 2014-08-03
    John Morreall (2014). The Comic Vision of Life. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):125-140.
    Tragedy has traditionally been ranked higher than comedy, and critics often valorize the ‘tragic vision of life’. Using twenty contrasts between tragedy and comedy, I argue that there is a ‘comic vision of life’ which is superior to the tragic vision, especially in the post-heroic era in which we live.
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  15. added 2014-08-03
    Sandra Shapshay & Steven Wagschal (2014). Contemporary Cinematic Tragedy and the 'Silver-Lining' Genre. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):161-174.
    Although much recent work in Anglo-American aesthetics on tragedy has focused exclusively on the ‘problems’ of tragic pleasure, in the long tradition of reflection on tragedy philosophers have focused more on tragedy as a genre of particular moral and political-philosophical significance. In this paper, we investigate the tragedy of our day in light of these latter concerns in order to determine what works of this genre reveal about the sense of the terrible necessities or near-necessities with which our contemporary Western (...)
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  16. added 2014-08-03
    Andrew Huddleston (2014). Hegel on Comedy: Theodicy, Social Criticism, and the 'Supreme Task' of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):227-240.
    According to Hegel, art in its ‘supreme task’ is engaged in ‘bringing to our minds and expressing the Divine, the deepest interests of mankind, and the most comprehensive truths of the spirit’. Raymond Geuss, in a highly illuminating paper, has connected Hegel’s conception of art’s supreme task with the project of theodicy. In this paper I explore Hegel’s aesthetics of comedy through this theodicy-based framework Geuss has proposed, and I consider what light this framework can shed on comedy and, reciprocally, (...)
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  17. added 2014-08-03
    Malcolm Heath (2014). Aristotle and the Value of Tragedy. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):111-123.
    This article explores Aristotle’s understanding of the value of tragedy. The primarily technical analyses of the Poetics are not sufficient for this purpose: they must be read in the context of Aristotle’s philosophical anthropology. An outline of Aristotle’s understanding of the structure of human motivation provides a framework within which to interpret his discussion of the uses of music, and in particular of music’s status as an intrinsically valuable component of cultivated leisure. Applying that model to tragedy requires an explanation (...)
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  18. added 2014-08-03
    Rafael De Clercq (2014). Building Plans as Natural Symbols. Architecture Philosophy 1 (1):61-78.
    Carroll William Westfall has claimed that building types can serve as natural symbols of (the purposes served by) activities such as venerating, celebrating, trading, and dwelling. The aim of this paper is to interpret Westfall’s claim in a way that makes it non-trivial and yet worthy of further investigation. In particular, an attempt is made to explain the connection between building types and what they symbolize without appealing to convention. The question is also answered whether a non-conventional connection is compatible (...)
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  19. added 2014-08-03
    Tzachi Zamir (2014). Why Does Comedy Give Pleasure? British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):175-190.
    By way of attempting to explain comic pleasure, this paper proposes an outline for an inclusive theory of comedy — ‘inclusive’ in the sense of amalgamating various past contributions that tend to be thought of as mutually exclusive. More specifically, this essay will (a) propose a teleological definition of comedy, (b) integrate seemingly competing accounts of laughter into a relatively unified explanation, (c) clarify the connection between laughter and comedy, (d) defend a flexible ontology of comic response that enables the (...)
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  20. added 2014-08-03
    Alison Denham (2014). Tragedy Without the Gods: Autonomy, Necessity and the Real Self. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (2):141-159.
    The classical tragedies relate conflicts, choices and dilemmas that have meaningful parallels in our own experience. Many of the normative dimensions of tragedy, however, rely critically on the causal and motivational efficacy of divine forces. In particular, these narratives present supernatural interventions invading their characters’ practical deliberations and undermining their claims to autonomous agency. Does this dynamic find any analogy in a contemporary, secular conception of moral agency? It does, but it is an analogy that challenges certain standard philosophical accounts (...)
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  21. added 2014-07-20
    Ben Bronner (forthcoming). Maps and Absent Symbols. Australasian Journal of Philosophy.
    ABSENCE is the claim that if a symbol appears on a map, then absence of the symbol from some map coordinate signifies absence of the corresponding property from the corresponding location. This claim is highly intuitive and widely endorsed. And if it is true, then cartographic representation is strikingly different from linguistic representation. I argue, however, that ABSENCE is false of various maps and we have no reason to believe it is true of any maps. The intuition to the contrary (...)
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  22. added 2014-07-15
    Simon Fokt (2014). The Cluster Account of Art: A Historical Dilemma. Contemporary Aesthetics 12:N/A.
    The cluster account, one of the best attempts at art classification, is guilty of ahistoricism. While cluster theorists may be happy to limit themselves to accounting for what art is now rather than how the term was understood in the past, they cannot ignore the fact that people seem to apply different clusters when judging art from different times. This paper shows that while allowing for this kind of historical relativity may be necessary to save the account, doing so could (...)
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  23. added 2014-07-14
    Ben Ware (forthcoming). Tragic-Dialectical-Perfectionism: On the Ethics of Beckett's 'Endgame'. College Literature.
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  24. added 2014-06-25
    Anne Schulherr Waters, A Transnational Indigenist Woman’s Agenda. American Philosophical Association Newsletter on American Indians in Philosophy, Vol.2, #2,.
    A poem delivered upon the memorial of Viola Cordova in honor of indigenous women everywhere. "Two millennia of indigenous diasporas, yet we are all indigenous to this planet . . . There is a transnational indigenist agenda at work here to preserve and protect the human race for humans to remain among all our relations" .
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  25. added 2014-06-16
    Robin James (forthcoming). Incandescence, Melancholy, and Feminist Bad Vibes. Differences 25 (2).
  26. added 2014-06-16
    Robin James (2014). Neoliberal Noise: Attali, Foucault, & the Biopolitics of Uncool. Culture, Theory, and Critique 52 (2):138-158.
    Is it even possible to resist or oppose neoliberalism? I consider two responses that translate musical practices into counter-hegemonic political strategies: Jacques Attali’s theory of “composition” and the biopolitics of “uncool.” Reading Jacques Attali’s Noise through Foucault’s late work, I argue that Attali’s concept of “repetition” is best understood as a theory of neoliberal biopolitics, and his theory composition is actually a model of deregulated subjectivity. Composition is thus not an alternative to neoliberalism but its quintessence. An aesthetics and ethos (...)
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  27. added 2014-06-15
    Ulrika Carlsson (2014). Kierkegaard's Phenomenology of Spirit. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (2).
    Kierkegaard's preoccupation with a separation between the ‘inner’ and the ‘outer’ runs through his work and is widely thought to belong to his rejection of Hegel's idealist monism. Focusing on The Concept of Irony and Either/Or, I argue that although Kierkegaard believes in various metaphysical distinctions between inside and outside (the inwardness of faith and the outwardness of ethics and language; the inwardness of emotion and the outwardness of behavior), he nonetheless understands the task of the philosopher as that of (...)
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  28. added 2014-06-10
    Johan De Smedt & Helen De Cruz (2013). Delighting in Natural Beauty: Joint Attention and the Phenomenology of Nature Aesthetics. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 5 (4):167-186.
    Empirical research in the psychology of nature appreciation suggests that humans across cultures tend to evaluate nature in positive aesthetic terms, including a sense of beauty and awe. They also frequently engage in joint attention with other persons, whereby they are jointly aware of sharing attention to the same event or object. This paper examines how, from a natural theological perspective, delight in natural beauty can be conceptualized as a way of joining attention to creation. Drawing on an analogy between (...)
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  29. added 2014-06-05
    Alon Chasid (forthcoming). Pictorial Experience and Intentionalism. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
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  30. added 2014-06-01
    Martijn Boven (2014). Kierkegaard's Concepts: Incognito. In Steven M. Emmanuel, Jon Stewart & William McDonald (eds.), Volume 15, Tome III: Kierkegaard's Concepts: Envy to Incognito. Ashgate. 231-236.
    The concept 'incognito' is derived from the Latin incognitus (in-, prefix that expresses negation or privation + cognit-us, past participle of cognōscĕre to get to know). Its lexical meaning in Danish is: appearing in disguise; acting under an unfamiliar, assumed name (or title) to avoid identification. The concept is mentioned in several of Kierkegaard’s works, but only becomes a subject of reflection in two: Concluding Unscientific Postscript to Philosophical Fragments by Johannes Climacus and Practice in Christianity by Anti-Climacus. Both pseudonyms (...)
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  31. added 2014-06-01
    Martijn Boven (2008). Wat vastgelegd is, misleidt ons: de Cahiers van Paul Valéry. Deus Ex Machina 127:5-6.
    Paul Valéry is de dichter die zwijgt; de denker die weigert filosoof te zijn; de schrijver die de taal in staat van beschuldiging stelt; de expert die volhoudt een amateur te zijn; de mysticus die zijn heil zoekt bij de wiskunde; de stamelaar die aan een kwaal van precisie lijdt; de Narcissus die misschien toch liever Orpheus had willen zijn. Hij is de chroniqueur van het denken en de meester van de tegenspraak. Ik probeer me hem voor te stellen. Het (...)
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