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Aesthetics

Edited by Rafael De Clercq (Lingnan University)
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  1. added 2016-05-31
    Sonia Sedivy (2004). Wittgenstein Against Interpretation: "the Meaning of a Text Does Not Stop Short of its Facts". In John Gibson Wolfgang Huemer (ed.), The Literary Wittgenstein. Routledge 165-185.
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  2. added 2016-05-30
    Angelo Caranfa (2016). Learning to See: Art, Beauty, and the Joy of Creation in Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):84-103.
    Education takes for granted that sight is there but that it isn’t turned the right way.A work of art... provokes in us... an image, which in our souls awakes surprise—sometimes, meditation—often, and always, the joy of creation.To place oneself in the path of beauty is the basic impulse underlying education.In The Aims of Education, Alfred North Whitehead claims that the goal of education is to cultivate an “aesthetic sense of realized perfection”1—namely, to instruct us in the way of the beautiful. (...)
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  3. added 2016-05-30
    Giulia Martina (2016). Pictorial Aesthetics and Two Kinds of Inflected Seeing-In. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):74-92.
    Inflected seeing-in is a special experience of the vehicle and subject of a picture, which are experienced as related to each other. Bence Nanay recently defended the idea that inflected picture perception is central to the aesthetic appreciation of pictures. Here I critically discuss his characterization of inflection, and advance a new one, that better accounts for the structure and content of inflected experience in terms of properties of the pictures themselves and also clarifies the distinctive contribution of inflection to (...)
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  4. added 2016-05-30
    Alexey Aliyev (2016). Unfit to Print: Contra Mag Uidhir on the Ontology of Photographic Artworks. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):3-13.
    According to the orthodox view, photographic artworks are abstract objects. This view, however, has recently been challenged by Christy Mag Uidhir. In his article ‘Photographic Art: An Ontology Fit to Print’, he argues in favour of a nominalist construal of photographic artworks. My goal is to show that Mag Uidhir’s argument is unpersuasive.
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  5. added 2016-05-30
    Akos Krassoy (2016). The Ethics of the Face in Art: On the Margins of Levinas’s Theory of Ethical Signification in Art. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):42-73.
    In ‘Reality and Its Shadow’, Levinas dismisses knowledge as a whole from art. This has deep implications for the ethical. The aesthetic event has nothing to do with the ethical event – art does not seem to hold a place for ethical knowledge. This situation is problematic with respect to the conflicting phenomenological evidence as well as with respect to Levinas himself, who occasionally relies on works of art in his ethical phenomenological analyses. My article aims to fill in the (...)
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  6. added 2016-05-30
    Troy Jollimore (2016). John Gibson, Ed., The Philosophy of Poetry. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):100-110.
    A review of John Gibson´s The Philosophy of Poetry.
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  7. added 2016-05-30
    Chris Perricone (2016). Aesthetic Quality: A Darwinian View. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):45-56.
    Je sais que la poesie est indepensable, mais je ne sais pas a quoi. [I know poetry is indispensable, but I don’t know what for.]A crucial characteristic of any aesthetic education is to understand the nature of aesthetic quality, that is, how to determine whether one artwork is superior to another. For example, I want to say that J. S. Bach’s Sixth Suite for Unaccompanied Cello performed by YoYo Ma is superior to “Thriller,” composed by Rod Temperton and performed by (...)
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  8. added 2016-05-30
    Tyson E. Lewis (2016). The Pedagogical Function of Art as Interpretation. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):57-71.
    Today, art and education have precarious statuses. Arts programs are being cut from the curriculum at an alarming rate. While the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 acknowledged the arts as a core academic subject, the arts were quickly eclipsed by the push toward quantifiable improvements on standardized tests. How should art educators respond to this urgent situation? While some might retreat back to an art-for-art’s-sake perspective, others find new justifications for the arts through the discourses of high-stakes testing (...)
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  9. added 2016-05-30
    Gianluca Consoli (2016). In Search of the Ontological Common Core of Artworks: Radical Embodiment and Non-Universalization. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):14-41.
    I propose that artworks represent a specific and homogeneous ontological kind, grounded in a common ontological core. I call this common core ‘non-universalizable embodied meaning’, and I argue that this common core explains how artworks unfold their ontological identity at the physical, intentional, and social levels on the basis of an original and irreducible mode of material embodiment and cultural emergence; this common core functions as the constitutive rule of art and institutes an axiological normativity, that is, normativity based on (...)
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  10. added 2016-05-30
    Tim Prentki (2016). Citizen Artists and Human Becomings. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):72-83.
    Quince: Bless thee, Bottom, bless thee! Thou art translated.Yet it can happen suddenly, unexpectedly, and most frequently in the half-light-of-glimpses, that we catch sight of another visible order which intersects with ours and has nothing to do with it.This article is a reflection on the process of transformation: whether that be a change of the physical kind undergone by Bottom through the acquisition of a donkey’s head or the inner alteration wrought by a moment of heightened perception of the type (...)
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  11. added 2016-05-30
    Howard Cannatella (2016). Building Public Confidence in Arts Education. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):26-44.
    There is a really big, complicated educational question that sometimes we hear and that always needs addressing, rebuffing, monitoring, and advancing but this is never going to be the last word on the matter because many things can transform it: the claim that no student should graduate from his or her high school without an understanding of what art is.Lots of people express this sentiment but in different ways. The statement could not be any clearer in its purpose. It is (...)
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  12. added 2016-05-30
    James Stillwaggon (2016). The Indirection of Influence: Poetics and Pedagogy in Aristotle and Plato. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):8-25.
    Transmitting knowledge or skills from one person or group to another has traditionally been understood as a merely proximate goal of education, the ultimate end being the lives students spend in pursuit of those learned ideals that keep our societies’ traditions alive. It is only by the life lived by the educated person or the collective life shared by an educated society that any account of educational success could properly be taken.1 Beliefs, attitudes, and habits appropriate to the society for (...)
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  13. added 2016-05-30
    Robert R. Clewis (2016). What's the Big Idea?: On Emily Brady's Sublime. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):104-118.
    “The sublime is a massive concept,” Emily Brady states in her book’s first sentence. Her lucid study of the sublime should interest scholars from a wide range of disciplines, from environmental philosophy and aesthetics to the history of philosophy, art history, and literary criticism. Although its title refers to modern philosophy, the book examines not only the period typically classified in philosophy as “modern,” but also romanticism and contemporary aesthetics. Brady aims “to reassess, and to some extent reclaim, the meaning (...)
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  14. added 2016-05-30
    Jeffrey Petts (2016). The Cultural Promise of The Aesthetic by Monique Roelofs. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):119-123.
    The central claim of Monique Roelofs’s wide-ranging examination of the aesthetic is that it “hold[s] out the promise of a shared culture... people and objects [connected] in flourishing collective and material bonds”. Roelofs acknowledges Kant’s and Hume’s commitment to shared human faculties that allow judgements of taste “to attain intersubjective validity”; but her argument quickly develops from this “promise” to one with social and political consequences—of a harmonious and egalitarian society—and to radically different theoretical formulations and conclusions. Roelofs then also (...)
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  15. added 2016-05-30
    Gary Kemp (2016). Science Versus the Humanities: Hyman on Wollheim on Depiction. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (2):1-7.
    In the seventh chapter of his extraordinary book The Objective Eye, John Hyman offers various criticisms of Richard Wollheim’s theory of pictorial depiction.1 My immediate purpose in this short piece is to make the case that these criticisms fail. By no means do I claim that there are not other criticisms to be made against Wollheim’s theory or that Hymans’s book as a whole fails—not in its overarching attempt to rescue the objectivity of art from subjectivist views or, more narrowly, (...)
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  16. added 2016-05-27
    Sonia Sedivy (2016). Beauty and The End of Art, Wittgenstein, Plurality and Perception. Bloomsbury.
  17. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). Kantian and Nietzschean Aesthetics of Human Nature: A Comparison Between the Beautiful/Sublime and Apollonian/Dionysian Dualities. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):166-217.
    Both for Kant and for Nietzsche, aesthetics must not be considered as a systematic science based merely on logical premises but rather as a set of intuitively attained artistic ideas that constitute or reconstitute the sensible perceptions and supersensible representations into a new whole. Kantian and Nietzschean aesthetics are both aiming to see beyond the forms of objects to provide explanations for the nobility and sublimity of human art and life. We can safely say that Kant and Nietzsche used the (...)
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  18. added 2016-05-24
    Erman Kaplama (2016). The Cosmological Aesthetic Worldview in Van Gogh’s Late Landscape Paintings. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 12 (1):218-237.
    Some artworks are called sublime because of their capacity to move human imagination in a different way than the experience of beauty. The following discussion explores how Van Gogh’s The Starry Night along with some of his other late landscape paintings accomplish this peculiar movement of imagination thus qualifying as sublime artworks. These artworks constitute examples of the higher aesthetic principles and must be judged according to the cosmological-aesthetic criteria for they manage to generate a transition between ethos and phusis (...)
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  19. added 2016-05-23
    Gemma Arguello Manresa (2016). La Paradoja del Suspenso Anómalo. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 68:49-65.
    Resumen: En este trabajo se aborda lo que en los debates recientes de filosofía del cine se ha denominado la paradoja del suspenso. Esta paradoja radica en el problema de que algunos espectadores sienten suspenso frente a una narración que ya conocían, partiendo del presupuesto de que la incertidumbre es un estado cognitivo necesario para sentir esta emoción. Se analizan varias propuestas recientes y se ofrece una alternativa a la mismas en la que se recupera la simpatía y la anticipación (...)
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  20. added 2016-05-23
    Gemma Arguello Manresa (2015). Arte de apropiación. Reconsideraciones alrededor del problema de los indiscernibles en Danto. Páginas de Filosofía 16 (19):80-95.
    Resumen: En este trabajo se desarrollan los argumentos que Arthur Danto elaboró en torno al significado metafórico y el estilo con el objetivo de mostrar si es posible que su modelo permita comprender nuevas formas de Arte de Apropiación. Éstas engloban las prácticas recientes en las que los artistas hacen réplicas más o menos exactas de otras obras que han sido importantes en la historia del arte. -/- Abstract: In this paper Arthur Danto’s arguments about metaphorical meaning and style are (...)
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  21. added 2016-05-23
    Gemma Arguello Manresa (2015). Relational Architecture: "Voz Alta" (Loud Voice), Rafael Lozano-Hemmer. In Jakub Petri (ed.), Performing Cultures. Institute of Philosophy of Jagiellonian University 43-51.
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  22. added 2016-05-22
    Derek Allan, Analytic Aesthetics and the Dilemma of Timelessness.
    Explores the failure of analytic aesthetics to examine the question of the capacity of art to transcend time, and its own commitment – seldom explicitly acknowledged – to the assumption that this capacity functions through the traditional, but no longer viable, notion of timelessness inherited from Enlightenment aesthetics.
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  23. added 2016-05-20
    Derek Allan (2016). The Death of Beauty: Goya's Etchings and Black Paintings Through the Eyes of André Malraux. History of European Ideas.
    Modern critics often regard Goya's etchings and black paintings as satirical observations on the social and political conditions of the time. In a study of Goya first published in 1950, which seldom receives the attention it merits, the French author and art theorist André Malraux contends that these works have a significance of a much deeper kind. The etchings and black paintings, Malraux argues, represent a fundamental challenge to the European artistic tradition that began with the Renaissance, an essentially humanist (...)
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  24. added 2016-05-17
    Cristian Timmermann & Georges F. Félix (forthcoming). Food Sovereignty and the Global South. In Paul B. Thompson & David M. Kaplan (eds.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics. Springer
    Farmers’ organizations all over the world are very well aware that in order to build and retain a critical mass with sufficient bargaining power to democratically influence local governments and international organizations they will have to unite by identifying common goals and setting aside their differences. After decades of local movements and struggles, farmers’ organizations around the globe found in the concept of “food sovereignty” the normative framework they were long searching for. The broadness of the concept has had a (...)
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  25. added 2016-05-13
    Fabian Dorsch (2016). Seeing-In as Aspect Perception. In Gary Kemp & Gabriele Mras (eds.), Wollheim, Wittgenstein, and Pictorial Representation: Seeing-as and Seeing-in. Routledge
  26. added 2016-05-08
    Derek Allan, Literature and the Passing of Time: Reflecting on the Temporal Nature of Art.
    The paper explores the much-neglected but crucial topic of the capacity of art to transcend time.
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  27. added 2016-05-08
    Derek Allan (2016). Vanquishing Temporal Distance: Malraux, Art and Metamorphosis. Australian Journal of French Studies 53 (1-2):136-148.
    How does art – literature, visual art, or music – endure over time? What special power does it possess that enables it to “transcend” time – to overcome temporal distance and speak to us not just as evidence of times gone by, but as a living presence? The Renaissance, which discovered this transcendent power of art in the classical sculpture and literature it admired so strongly, concluded that great art is impervious to time – “timeless”, “immortal”, “eternal” – a belief (...)
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  28. added 2016-05-05
    Judith Wolfe (2016). Hermione's Sophism: Ordinariness and Theatricality in The Winter's Tale. Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):83-105.
    For both Rush Rhees and Stanley Cavell, Wittgenstein’s late investigations into language and language games are caught up with a profound underlying concern about the possibility of discourse itself. Rhees and Cavell isolate two such conditions, which are closely related.The first, emphasized by Cavell, is what he calls “acknowledgment.” In his seminal essay “Knowing and Acknowledging”, Cavell engages traditional skeptical arguments against the possibility of knowing other minds. Unlike most philosophers, however, Cavell does not attempt to repudiate the skeptic’s concerns (...)
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  29. added 2016-05-01
    Noel Carroll (2016). Danto's Comic Vision: Philosophical Method and Literary Style. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):554-563.
    Arthur Danto numbers among the few contemporary philosophers whose writing is really a pleasure to read. Although rarely recognized, the source of that pleasure is Danto’s humor. His philosophical writing is consistently comic. Of course, the humor is obviously not of the knee-slapping variety. Yet it is pervasively playful.Danto will introduce a thought experiment and then explore it in several directions. Unlike many other contemporary philosophers, he is not stingy in laying out his examples. Whereas it is customary for most (...)
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  30. added 2016-05-01
    Abraham Schneider (2016). In the Presence of the Bird. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):543-553.
    To Dean Volek and Assembled Panel:Needless to say, the incident that transpired the morning of February the 8th was regrettable to all concerned—to Mrs. Horvath, who had to play witness to such a spectacle of savagery outside her office window, to the students who witnessed the same, to the college itself, which had to clean up the mess, literally as well as with the press—and of course my sincerest apologies to the local chapter of the Audubon Society, whose more enthusiastic (...)
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  31. added 2016-05-01
    Ann Hartle (2016). "Sociable Wisdom": Montaigne's Transformation of Philosophy. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):285-304.
    Montaigne’s last words in the Essays—the words that capture his entire project—are “sociable wisdom.” Philosophy has been transformed from the “love of wisdom” to “sociable wisdom” and this transformation is, at the same time, the transformation of the human world, the production of society, a new mode of human association. What is “sociable wisdom” and how has it produced this remarkable effect?Philosophy means “the love of wisdom.” Although the term is believed to have been used first by Pythagoras, Socrates presents (...)
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  32. added 2016-05-01
    Franz R. Kempf (2016). Noble Savages and English Gardeners: Kulturkritik From Rousseau to Goethe. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):422-442.
    “The human being embodies a tension between a nature which has since been lost and an unreachable Divine Creator,” writes Rudolf Borchardt in his book The Passionate Gardener. And he continues: “The garden stands at precisely the center of this tension and displaces itself, in accord with its fluctuations in the epoch and the individual, toward one or the other: toward nature or creativity. This is the deepest reason for which the human being dreams that our origins lie in a (...)
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  33. added 2016-05-01
    Mark Byers (2016). Imagining Uncertainty: Charles Olson and Karl Popper. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):443-458.
    In his preface to The Poverty of Historicism, Karl Popper graciously notified his readers of a major shortcoming in his study, first published in three parts in Economica in 1944 and 1945. Though he had “tried to show” in these papers that “historicism is a poor method,” they did not “actually refute historicism.”1 That is, though he had revealed historicism to be founded on “common misunderstandings of the methods of physics”, he had not logically refuted its two principal assumptions: that (...)
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  34. added 2016-04-30
    Walter Horn (forthcoming). Tonality, Musical Form, and Aesthetic Value. Perspectives of New Music 53.
    It has been claimed by Diana Raffman, that atonal (and in particular serial) music can have no aesthetic value, because it is in an important sense meaningless. This worthlessness is claimed to result from cognitive/psychological facts about human listeners that have been confirmed by empirical investigations such as those conducted by Lerdahl and Jackendoff. Similar assertions about the necessary inferiority of 12-tone music have been made by, among others, Taruskin, Cavell, and Goldman, some of whom echo Raffman’s suggestion that both (...)
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  35. added 2016-04-30
    Aakanksha Virkar-Yates (2016). An Objective Chemistry: What T. S. Eliot Borrowed From Schopenhauer. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):527-537.
    In his 1926 lectures on metaphysical poetry, T. S. Eliot describes the work of Jules Laforgue as the “nearest verse equivalent to the philosophies of Schopenhauer and Hartmann,” a literary rendition of their philosophies of the unconscious and of annihilation.1 Yet, Eliot suggests, in Laforgue the system of Schopenhauer ultimately collapses; the poet does not find in the philosopher that metaphysical balance between thought and feeling he so desperately craves. Schopenhauer’s philosophy, Eliot asserts, is “muddled by feeling—for what is more (...)
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  36. added 2016-04-30
    Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2016). Kitsch and Bullshit. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):305-321.
    Harry Frankfurt’s twenty-two page long essay “On Bullshit” was published in 1986 in an academic journal and appeared as a stand-alone book in 2005. The small book was successful and has sparked many discussions by both academics and public intellectuals. In this article I want to examine if, in the realm of art, kitsch overlaps with bullshit as a sort of “aesthetic bullshit” or if there are differences between bullshit as a predominantly ethical phenomenon and kitsch, which works much more (...)
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  37. added 2016-04-30
    Willard Bohn (2016). Apollinaire and the Broken Wine Glass. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):459-467.
    Five days before his twenty-first birthday, Guillaume Apollinaire set out on an automobile trip that would in large part determine his future. Together with the Viscountess Elinor de Milhau, who had hired him to tutor her daughter in French, he left for Germany on August 21, 1901. Since the car averaged thirty kilometers an hour, it took them nine days to reach her villa on the Rhine, near Honnef. For the next year, Apollinaire tutored the daughter in the morning and (...)
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  38. added 2016-04-30
    Richard Eldridge (2016). On Alan Goldman's Philosophy and the Novel. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):564-571.
    It is worth at least a moment to note and praise Alan Goldman’s methodological stance in Philosophy and the Novel.1 Goldman reflects appreciatively on the achievements of specific novels in order to arrive at philosophically interesting results about interpretation and moral understanding. In his appreciative reflections, Goldman is aware of, but by no means bound by, recent work in experimental moral psychology and metaethics. The result is a powerful demonstration not only of the human, cognitive, and ethical interest of the (...)
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  39. added 2016-04-30
    Jules Brody (2016). Reading Yeats: "The Fascination of What's Difficult". Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):487-494.
    As every teacher of literature knows, obscure writing is not necessarily the most problematic kind to deal with. A sonnet by Donne or an equal number of lines by Dylan Thomas will handily fill the teaching hour. But what about that other kind of writing, the kind that imposes silence, not by its obvious difficulty but by its infuriating obviousness, the perfection of its form, the simplicity of its language, the transparency of its meaning? There is no trouble filling the (...)
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  40. added 2016-04-30
    Gabriel Zoran (2016). Between Appropriation and Representation: Aristotle and the Concept of Imitation in Greek Thought. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):468-486.
    Let us imagine an actor on stage presenting an impersonation of a certain politician, his manners and his body language. Now, suppose another actor sitting in the audience, impressed by the show and deciding to adopt something of his colleague’s style. He rents another stage and presents an impersonation of the same politician according to what he has learned. What does he actually do? In a certain sense he “imitates” the politician, but in another sense he “imitates” the first actor, (...)
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  41. added 2016-04-30
    Jules Brody (2016). A Philological Reading of a Poem by Dylan Thomas. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):495-507.
    Last night I dived my beggar armDays deep in her breast that wore no heartFor me alone but only a rocked drumTelling the heart I broke of a good habitThat her loving, unfriendly limbsWould plunge my betrayal from sheet to skySo the betrayed might learn in the sun beamsOf the death in a bed in another country.1This poem, as far as I have been able to determine, has never been the object of any published critical commentary. The only help that (...)
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  42. added 2016-04-30
    Rune Graulund (2016). Restrained Excess: Where Sophistication Meets the Grotesque. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):338-355.
    Readily conjured images of “grotesque” behavior—such as, say, vomiting on one’s plate during dinner or fornicating in public—are hard to envisage as acts of “sophistication.” In fact it seems that the grotesque constitutes the exact opposite of sophistication. For whereas the grotesque is loud and insistent, “characteristically [evoking] a sudden shock,” sophistication is characterized by that which is subdued and refined.1 Unlike the grotesque, which is to some extent defined by spectacle, sophistication is at its finest when it remains unnoticed. (...)
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  43. added 2016-04-30
    Ernest Fontana (2016). Leopardi's Transgressive Calendar. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):538-542.
    The editors of the recently published English translation of Giacomo Leopardi’s Zibaldone—the philosophical and philological commentary/notebook begun in the summer of 1817, when he was 19 years of age, and abandoned in the winter of 1832, four years before his death in Naples—note that for the first time, in his entry on April 20, 1821, Leopardi supplements the date of the secular calendar with a Roman Catholic festival, such as Good Friday.1 Leopardi’s references to the Catholic calendar increase in early (...)
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  44. added 2016-04-30
    Yi-Ping Ong (2016). Simone de Beauvoir's Theory of the Novel: The Opacity, Ambiguity, and Impartiality of Life. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):379-405.
    Between 1946 and 1965, a period during which her contemporaries are calling into question the value of traditional novelistic realism, Simone de Beauvoir develops an extended and nuanced account of the philosophical significance of the realist novel in essays such as “Littérature et métaphysique”, “An American Renaissance in France”, and “Que peut la littérature?”. Beauvoir’s central claim is that novels do philosophical work not by articulating theoretical positions or illustrating abstract themes but by reorienting philosophical ways of understanding truth, world, (...)
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  45. added 2016-04-30
    Mordechai Gordon (2016). Camus, Nietzsche, and the Absurd: Rebellion and Scorn Versus Humor and Laughter. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):364-378.
    Throughout his relatively short life, Albert Camus struggled with nihilism and the absurd nature of human existence. Indeed, many of his writings deal with the problem of nihilism and with the issues of suicide, murder, suffering, and mass death. Always serious in his writings yet never resorting to cynicism or despair, Camus advocated rebellion as a response to nihilism. The choice of rebellion as a response to the absurdity of human existence makes sense when one realizes that his life spanned (...)
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  46. added 2016-04-30
    Zoe Beenstock (2016). Lyrical Sociability: The Social Contract and Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):406-421.
    Although all readers of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein agree with Victor that his creation of the monster was a mistake, few are certain about how it should be resolved. Shelley offers two vexed solutions to the problem of the creature. The first, explored in the plot of Frankenstein, unfolds with an air of tragic inevitability; Victor destroys his creature and—by extension—himself. But the second solution that Shelley raises, through the creature’s earnest behest that Victor make him a partner, also presents obstacles. (...)
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  47. added 2016-04-30
    Jules Brody (2016). Dylan Thomas, "Twenty-Four Years": A Philological Reading. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):508-526.
    Twenty-four years remind the tears of my eyes.In the groin of the natural doorway I crouched like a tailorSewing a shroud for a journeyBy the light of the meat-eating sun.Dressed to die, the sensual strut begun,With my red veins full of money,In the final direction of the elementary townI advance for as long as forever is.1The first problem raised in this poem is the agrammatical status of the word remind, which in normal usage governs either a verbal or phrasal complement. (...)
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  48. added 2016-04-30
    Cara E. Palmer (2016). Failed Escape: Action and Avoidance of Responsibility in The English Patient. Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):356-363.
    In Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient, Almásy favors an anonymity of identity based in private experience, and to that end hides his personal history from view. Almásy shields his personal experiences from the eyes of the individuals he encounters, as well as from the reader. This conscious act indicates that Almásy believes that the choices he makes do not matter, because who he is in relation to the world and to the greater forces of time and history is insignificant. He (...)
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  49. added 2016-04-27
    Brent Kalar (2016). Peters, Julia. Hegel on Beauty. New York: Routledge, 2015, 161 Pp., $145.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):215-217.
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  50. added 2016-04-27
    Alan H. Goldman (2016). Walton, Kendall. In Other Shoes: Music, Metaphor, Empathy, Existence. Oxford University Press, 2015, 295 Pp., $29.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):203-205.
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