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Aesthetics

Edited by Rafael De Clercq (Lingnan University)
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  1. added 2016-08-28
    Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2016). Claiming the Domain of the Literary: Mourning the Death of Reading Fiction. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (June (6)):505-11.
    This essay reviews the domain of the literary contrasting it with other intellectual discourses; especially philosophy. It establishes the superiority of literature over philosophy. And mentions the philosophies informing literature. The essay is written consciously with copious footnotes, contrary to current ways of writing. The essay proper is simple; the footnotes often mock jargon and mimic pedantry.
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  2. added 2016-08-26
    John McAteer (2016). Silencing Theodicy with Enthusiasm: Aesthetic Experience as a Response to the Problem of Evil in Shaftesbury, Annie Dillard, and the Book of Job. Heythrop Journal 57 (5):788-795.
    The problem of evil is not only a logical problem about God's goodness but also an existential problem about the sense of God's presence, which the Biblical book of Job conceives as a problem of aesthetic experience. Thus, just as theism can be grounded in religious experience, atheism can be grounded in experience of evil. This phenomenon is illustrated by two contrasting literary descriptions of aesthetic experience by Jean-Paul Sartre and Annie Dillard. I illuminate both of these literary texts with (...)
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  3. added 2016-08-26
    David Vessey (2006). Paul Fairfield. Theorizing Praxis: Studies in Hermeneutical Pragmatism. New York: Peter Lang, 2000. Pp. 184. Cloth ISBN 0-8204-4997-0. [REVIEW] Contemporary Pragmatism 3 (2):171-175.
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  4. added 2016-08-24
    Allen Alain Viguier (2015). Just What is It That Makes the Same so Different? The Object After Post-Object Art. Hotel des Bains Editions..
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  5. added 2016-08-22
    Piotr Kozak (2016). Sztuka i myśl. Wydawnictwo Fundacji Na Rzecz Myślenia Im. Barbary Skargi.
    W pracy Sztuka i myśl staram się argumentować, że sztuka jest formą myślenia. Rozumiem przez to, po pierwsze, że możemy o sztuce myśleć jako o pewnej klasie operacji pojęciowych, gdzie operacje pojęciowe należy interpretować jako bezpośrednie rozpoznawania poprawności realizacji danej dyspozycji poznawczej lub praktycznej. Po drugie, argumentuję, że sztukę możemy rozumieć jako pewien sposób widzenia i myślenia. Twierdzę, że sztuka ukazuje to, w jaki sposób możemy widzieć i myśleć o danych przedstawieniach, mówiąc ściślej, sztuka wyznacza reguły i pojęcia, za pomocą (...)
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  6. added 2016-08-20
    Alex Neill & Aaron Ridley (2016). Still an Error: Relational Theories of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):187-189.
    Aaron Meskin and Simon Fokt have recently taken issue with our 2012 paper, ‘Relational Theories of Art: the History of an Error’. Here we respond to their objections.
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  7. added 2016-08-20
    Matthew Crippen (2016). Screen Performers Playing Themselves. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):163-177.
    Whereas recent commentators have suggested that consumer demand, typecasting and marketing lead performers to maintain continuities across films, I argue that cinema has historically made it difficult to subtract performers from roles, leading to relatively constant comportment, and that casting, marketing and audience preference are not only causes but also effects of this. I do so using thought experiments and empirical experiments, for example, by pondering why people say they see Jesus in paintings of him and rarely mention models, but (...)
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  8. added 2016-08-20
    Jakub Stejskal (2016). Art and Bewilderment. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):131-147.
    In this paper, I seek to defend the proposition that bewilderment can contribute to the interest we take in artworks. Taking inspiration from Alois Riegl’s underdeveloped explanation of why his contemporaries valued some historically distant artworks higher than recent art, I interpret the historical case of the European audiences’ fascination with the Fayum mummy portraits as involving such a bewilderment. I distinguish the claim about effective bewilderment from the thesis that aesthetic meaning resists discursive understanding and seek to establish that (...)
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  9. added 2016-08-20
    Katherine Tullmann (2016). Sympathy and Fascination. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):115-129.
    Why do we form strong emotional attachments to unlikeable and immoral characters during our engagements with fictions? These pro-attitudes persist even as we realize that we would loathe these people if we were to encounter them in real-life. In this paper, I explore the implications of the sympathy for the devil phenomenon. I begin by considering several popular explanations, including simulation, aesthetic distancing, pre-focusing, and the ‘best of all characters’. I conclude that each one is inadequate. I then propose my (...)
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  10. added 2016-08-19
    Nicola Mößner (2010). Wie wirklich ist die Wirklichkeit. Wissenschaftliche Fotografien als Daten. In Richard Heinrich, Elisabeth Nemeth & Wolfram Pichler (eds.), Bild und Bildlichkeit in Philosophie, Wissenschaft und Kunst (Image and Imaging in Philosophy, Science, and the Arts), Papers of the 33 rd International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society 216-219.
    Fotografien können als paradigmatische Instanzen des Bildbegriffs aufgefasst werden. Sie finden umfangreiche Verwendung in den Wissenschaften. Die kausale Relation zum abgebildeten Objekt sowie die vermeintliche Ähnlichkeit des Bildes mit seinem Gegenstand scheinen ihren Gebrauch als Belege im Forschungsprozess zu legitimieren. Anhand einer Fallstudie zur Oberflächenerfassung des Planeten Mars mit Hilfe einer digitalen Spezialkamera soll in diesem Beitrag untersucht werden, inwiefern Fotografien der Status eines wissenschaftlichen Datums tatsächlich zugesprochen werden kann oder nicht.
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  11. added 2016-08-19
    John Gibson & Wolfgang Huemer (eds.) (2008). 文人维特根斯坦.
    Translation of _The Literary Wittgenstein_ (ed. by John Gibson and Wolfgang Huemer, London: Routledge, 2004). Simplified Chinese. ISBN 978-7-80762-896-5.
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  12. added 2016-08-17
    Bernard Harrison (2016). Leavis and Wittgenstein. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):206-225.
    I think of myself as an anti-philosopher, which is what a literary critic ought to be.For a number of years my work has been partly occupied with the examination of various points of contact between philosophy and literature. It involved, however, no more than marginal reference to the work of F. R. Leavis, certainly because of a culpable lack on my part of extended acquaintance with his work, but also to some extent, no doubt, because of Leavis’s own resolute denial (...)
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  13. added 2016-08-17
    St Hope Earl McKenzie (2016). Sculpting Ideas: Can Philosophy Be an Art Form? Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):34-43.
    The question of the possibility of philosophy being an art form concludes Robert Nozick’s Philosophical Explanations.1 He seems to be of the view that an affirmative answer would augur well for further inquiry into the kinds of core philosophical questions, those that “make us tremble,” he writes, which he has just examined: the identity of the self; why is there something rather than nothing; knowledge and skepticism; free will; the foundation of ethics; and the meaning of life.2 These explorations aim (...)
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  14. added 2016-08-17
    Elizabeth Purcell (2016). The Crisis of Subjectivity: The Significance of Darstellung and Freedom in E. T. A. Hoffmann's "The Sandman". Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):44-58.
    In the latter part of the eigthteenth century, philosophers faced a problem with respect to moral freedom. They were concerned not only with an account of how one could be free in the Newtonian system of nature but also with how it might be possible to represent that freedom. The imagination provided an answer. The imagination, thought to have limitless potential through aesthetic experiences and judgments, provided the bridge between our abstract, intellectual understanding of the world and the conditions of (...)
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  15. added 2016-08-17
    Iris Vidmar (2016). Deaths in Venice: The Cases of Gustav von Aschenbach by Philip Kitcher. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):320-324.
    From philosophy of science, epistemology, and ethics to political philosophy and philosophy of mathematics, Philip Kitcher has made outstanding contributions to every philosophical discipline. With Deaths in Venice: The Cases of Gustav von Aschenbach, he continues his journey into philosophy of literature he undertook back in 2007 with his book Joyce’s Kaleidoscope. Written in his clear, precise, and occasionally almost poetic style, Deaths in Venice is not only an inspiring new interpretation of Thomas Mann’s famous novel Death in Venice but (...)
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  16. added 2016-08-17
    Edward Greenwood (2016). Leavis, Tolstoy, Lawrence, and "Ultimate Questions". Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):157-170.
    Leavis’s turn from a preoccupation with poetry to a preoccupation with the novel in the second part of his career has long been recognized. There is a consensus that he had a wonderful feeling for the textual particularity of poetry, the way that a poem is not just its paraphrasable content, in that the meaning is carried by the movement, rhythm, tone, and tempo of the speaking voice. Poetry intended for the eye and print reading only passed him by. It (...)
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  17. added 2016-08-17
    Joseph G. Kronick (2016). Levinas and the Plot Against Literature. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):265-272.
    The remarkable interest in ethical theory shown over the last decade may simply be a return to the norms of literary scholarship. After all, ethics has dominated criticism of literature since Plato and Aristotle, and even with the emergence of formalism, in both its Russian and American varieties, ethical justifications of literature remained in place.However, the increasing influence of Emmanuel Levinas upon literary theory raises questions about the relation of ethical philosophy to literature.1 As his 1948 essay “Reality and Its (...)
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  18. added 2016-08-17
    A. J. Nickerson (2016). On The Philosophy of Poetry, Ed. John Gibson. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):309-314.
    The Philosophy of Poetry. “Of” intimates something more than copular coexistence. This could be the systematic and propositional attempt to define what poetry is, subjecting poetry to philosophical investigation with its distinctive questions and processes of inquiry. As a literary critic, however, I heard the title The Philosophy of Poetry as an assertion of poetry’s discursive, cognitive value: it suggests there are varieties of philosophic thought, of which one might be the poetic organization of understanding. Between these inversions there are (...)
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  19. added 2016-08-17
    Paul Standish (2016). Absolute Pitch and Exquisite Rightness of Tone. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):226-239.
    Wittgenstein was apparently looking for someone else. It was because he had not been successful that he had knocked at the Leavises’ door, to bide his time there before he looked again. On entering the house, he immediately peered through the window into the street. Yet after a moment he turned and said abruptly: “You’ve got a gramophone, I see—I don’t suppose you’ve anything worth playing.” And “Then,” so Leavis continues the description,with a marked change of tone, he exclaimed “Ah!”: (...)
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  20. added 2016-08-17
    Michael Bell (2016). Creativity and Pedagogy in Leavis. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):171-188.
    I never heard or met F. R. Leavis personally, but like many others I have felt the impact of his writing as teaching and would like to reflect on its nature in that regard. His published criticism is strongly inflected toward the purposes of teaching. His notorious exclusions, for example, of authors he knew very well are partly directed to the practical consideration of how much a conscientious student can read attentively in a three-year degree syllabus, and what reading in (...)
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  21. added 2016-08-17
    Chris Joyce (2016). Rethinking Leavis. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):137-156.
    “What is a word?”1 The question was not asked in the expectation of a definitive answer, for words of their nature—as he saw—cannot readily provide one. It is of course a truism that all definitions are made of words, but Leavis was apt to point out that the meanings of many important words resist full lexical definition. Their being thus resistant is often a mark of their importance.2 By a very different route, Wittgenstein arrived at an “answer” akin to that (...)
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  22. added 2016-08-17
    Danièle Moyal-Sharrock (2016). Introduction. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):124-126.
    Leavis would not have approved of the third epithet in our title. He saw himself as an “anti-philosopher”—philosophers being thinkers who reduce thought to “isms.” Leavis was clear that he was neither a theorist nor a philosopher, but as a literary critic he could not avoid thinking about the kind of existence works of literature have, and how they can be forms of thought. In “Leavisian Thinking,” Ian Robinson shows how this led him to develop the idea of the “third (...)
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  23. added 2016-08-17
    Ian Robinson (2016). Leavisian Thinking. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):127-136.
    Iknow that some people find that Leavis’s mode of thought and what he had to say about thinking are obscure or difficult. We are dealing with some profound matters, but some profundities can be elucidated as well in twenty minutes as twenty years. I think the subject can be treated briefly and lucidly, and the challenge to me is to do so.What counts as thinking? What does it cover? Narrow the question immediately to thinking about, so as to avoid tricky (...)
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  24. added 2016-08-17
    Paul Dean (2016). Leavis on Tragedy. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):189-205.
    Returning from the Great War to Cambridge in 1919, F. R. Leavis switched from studying history to studying English. It’s not hard to see why. The academic study of history must have seemed monstrously unreal to him after what he had been through, and the fledgling English School offered, as he later said, “a creative response to change—change in society and civilization that had been made unignorable by the war,”1 in contrast to the Oxford course, which reflected “the habit instilled (...)
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  25. added 2016-08-17
    John C. Hampsey (2016). The Idea of the "Good". Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):285-296.
    The concept of prayer didn’t exist until the first step outside the garden. And Adam and Eve’s prayers had to be maddened ones, predicated upon a new and shockingly acquired paranoidic consciousness, completely unlike their prelapserian paranoic1 state wherein the primal couple didn’t know hope or prayer inside the amoral edenic, in the egregious garden where anything was possible anytime.And that is why you don’t notice the word “good” in the original account of creation in Genesis; that is, the “J” (...)
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  26. added 2016-08-17
    Derek McDougall (2016). Wittgenstein's Remarks on William Shakespeare. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):297-308.
    Wittgenstein as Shakespearean critic. Because Wittgenstein’s commentators agree that Shakespeare is the world’s greatest ever playwright, they have to account for those few remarks of his that may suggest a negative evaluation of Shakespeare as a poet. But these remarks can also be used to reveal that Shakespeare is a poet of a kind uniquely different to the majority of those whom Wittgenstein admired. This view is central to John Middleton Murry’s interpretation of Shakespeare and Keats. In a more positive (...)
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  27. added 2016-08-17
    John G. Peters (2016). Joseph Conrad and the Epistemology of Space. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):98-123.
    Under the sumptuous immensity of the sky, the snow covered the endless forests, the frozen rivers, the plains of an immense country, obliterating the landmarks, the accidents of the ground, levelling everything under its uniform whiteness, like a monstrous blank page awaiting the record of an inconceivable history.Increased interest in the experience of space in literature in recent decades has resulted in numerous commentaries on such topics as colonial space, geographical space, gendered space, liminal space, psychic space, and signifying space. (...)
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  28. added 2016-08-17
    Greg Stone (2016). The Myth of Narcissus as a Surreptitious Allegory About Creativity. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):273-284.
    Perhaps no myth is more misunderstood than the story of Narcissus, who is erroneously thought to be self-absorbed, egotistical, and vain. Adding to the confusion, a growth industry on narcissism has emerged in academic circles. case in point: Professor Daniel Ames of columbia business School devised a brief personality test with sixteen binary choices such as “I am going to be a great person” or “I hope I am going to be successful.”1 One student did so “well” that he boasted (...)
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  29. added 2016-08-17
    Sanford Budick (2016). The Function of Kant's Miltonic Citations on a Page of the Opus Postumum. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):76-97.
    On one manuscript page of the Opus postumum Kant twice recurs to a passage from Paradise Lost that, seven years earlier, he had cited to exemplify aesthetic ideas and the concept of succession.1 Now he calls on these same verses to perform an additional function, namely, to represent the a priori idea of a community of reciprocity. For Kant, the “insertion” of this idea serves as an “actus of cognition” that can enable experience of the “subjectively actual”.2In the cited passage (...)
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  30. added 2016-08-17
    John Gibson (2016). La Guerra Dei Poveri : A Response to A. J. Nickerson. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):315-316.
    What the author of this essay-review says about our handling of scholarship on poetry in The Philosophy of Poetry is perhaps true. Literary scholars often accuse us of ignoring their work, just as we at times condemn them for their questionable treatment of philosophical issues. There is a smallness to all this, on both sides, and the effect is almost always to affirm the very disciplinary boundaries we are trying to overcome when telling others that they should read our work.Fortunately, (...)
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  31. added 2016-08-17
    László Kajtár (2016). The Cognitive Value of Philosophical Fiction by Jukka Mikkonen. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):317-319.
    Many of us read works of fiction passionately not only because of their entertainment value or for their aesthetic inventiveness but also because we feel that they enrich our understanding of ourselves and the world. This is where there seems to be an important resemblance to philosophy. A number of fictional works can be legitimately called “philosophical” because they are thought provoking about issues that works of philosophy explicitly deal with. However, as the hot debate concerning truth through literature or (...)
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  32. added 2016-08-17
    Danièle Moyal-Sharrock (2016). Wittgenstein and Leavis: Literature and the Enactment of the Ethical. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):240-264.
    Shakespeare displays the dance of human passions, one might say. … But he displays it to us in a dance, not naturalistically.In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein says that ethics cannot be put into words. This does not mean he thought ethics could not be made manifest; and indeed I will suggest that Wittgenstein took the best manifestation of ethics to be in aesthetics, and more specifically literature. Literature uses words in such a way as to allow ethics to show itself. It (...)
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  33. added 2016-08-17
    M. W. Rowe (2016). Lines to Time: A Poem by V. Penelope Pelizzon. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):1-33.
    And haven’t I repeatedly discovered that the writing I care about most can be understood as letting death into the room?Pelizzon’s poetry is acquiring a reputation. Her poems have appeared widely in periodicals ; her first book, Nostos,1 won the Hollis Summers Prize and the Norma Farber First Book Award from the Poetry Society of America; she’s recently received a Lannan Foundation fellowship and an Amy Lowell traveling scholarship; and her second collection, Whose Flesh Is Flame, Whose Bone Is Time, (...)
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  34. added 2016-08-17
    Mark Anderson (2016). Melville and Nietzsche: Living the Death of God. Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):59-75.
    Scholars long ago exposed the black vein of nihilism that runs through Herman Melville’s life and thought. But the majority of those who have endeavored to track its course have lacked the philosophical background prerequisite to a thorough exploration, and their works are now many years old.1 The most notable exception is All Things Shining, the recent effort of two professors of philosophy.2 Unfortunately, however, as I have previously argued in these pages, the authors of this book are less interested (...)
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  35. added 2016-08-15
    Alan Roberts (forthcoming). Humour is a Funny Thing. British Journal of Aesthetics.
    This paper considers the question of how immoral elements in instances of humour affect funniness. Comic ethicism is the position that each immoral element negatively affects funniness and if their cumulative effect is sufficient, then funniness is eliminated. I focus on Berys Gaut’s (1998, 2007) central argument in favour of comic ethicism; the merited response argument. Noël Carroll (2014) has criticized the merited response argument as illegitimately conflating comic merit with moral merit. I argue that the merited response argument, and (...)
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  36. added 2016-08-15
    Thomas Pölzler (2016). Art in the Face of the Absurd. In Stefan Majetschak & Anja Weiberg (eds.), Contributions of the 39th International Wittgenstein Symposium. Austrian Ludwig Wittgenstein Society 196-198.
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  37. added 2016-08-14
    Eran Guter (2016). Wittgenstein Reimagines Musical Depth. In Stefan Majetschak Anja Weiberg (ed.), Aesthetics Today: Contemporary Approaches to the Aesthetics of Nature and of Art, Contributions to the 39th International Wittgenstein Symposium (Kirchberg am Wechsel: ALWS, 2016). 87-89.
    I explore and outline Wittgenstein's original response to the Romantic discourse concerning musical depth, from his middle-period on. Schopenhauer and Spengler served as immediate sources for Wittgenstein's reliance on Romantic metaphors of depth concerning music. The onset for his philosophic intervention in the discourse was his critique of Schenker's view of music and his general shift toward the 'anthropological view', which occurred at the same time. In his post-PI period Wittgenstein was able to reimagine musical depth in terms of vertically (...)
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  38. added 2016-08-12
    Hanoch Ben-Pazi (2015). Emmanuel Levinas: Hermeneutics, Ethics, and Art. Journal of Literature and Art Studies 5:pp. 588 - 600.
    "Art does not know a particular type of reality; it contrasts with knowledge. It is the very event of obscuring, a descent of the night, an invasion of shadow" (Levinas 1989, 132). Levinas chooses these words to depict the role, action, and essence of art. Terms such as "obscuring," "descent of the night," and "shadow" serve as modes of a consciousness that is different from, if not the opposite of, "enlightened" knowledge, which is signified, in contrast, by terms such as (...)
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  39. added 2016-08-11
    Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen (forthcoming). Fictional Persuasion and the Nature of Belief. In Ema Sullivan-Bissett, Helen Bradley & Paul Noordhof (eds.), Art and the Nature of Belief. Oxford University Press
    Psychological studies on fictional persuasion demonstrate that being engaged with fiction systematically affects our beliefs about the real world, in ways that seem insensitive to the truth. This threatens to undermine the widely accepted view that beliefs are essentially regulated in ways that tend to ensure their truth, and may tempt various non-doxastic interpretations of the belief-seeming attitudes we form as a result of engaging with fiction. I evaluate this threat, and argue that it is benign. Even if the relevant (...)
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  40. added 2016-08-09
    Dustin Stokes (2016). Review of Bence Nanay-Aesthetics as Philosophy of Perception. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 8:00.
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  41. added 2016-08-06
    Robert Clewis (2015). “The Place of the Sublime in Kant’s Project”. Studi Kantiani 28:63-82.
    I emphasize the harmony between the sublime and the underlying concept of the purposiveness of nature, i.e. that the sublime is purposive through its initial contrapurposiveness. One favorable outcome of this reading is that it locates further unity in the Critique of Judgment, e.g. it helps make sense of why, besides historical reasons, Kant may have turned to the sublime in the first place in the “Critique of the Aesthetic Power of Judgment” (Part One of the CJ). I question some (...)
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  42. added 2016-08-04
    Andrea Sauchelli (2016). The Will to Make‐Believe: Religious Fictionalism, Religious Beliefs, and the Value of Art. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 93 (1).
    I explore some of the reasons why, under specific circumstances, it may be rational to make-believe or imagine certain religious beliefs. Adopting a jargon familiar to certain contemporary philosophers, my main concern here is to assess what reasons can be given for adopting a fictionalist stance towards some religious beliefs. My understanding of fictionalism does not involve solely a propositional attitude but a broader stance, which may include certain acts of pretence. I also argue that a plausible reason to be (...)
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  43. added 2016-08-04
    Christoph Lindner (2015). The Oblique Art of Shoes: Popular Culture, Aesthetic Pleasure, and the Humanities. Journal for Cultural Research 19 (3):233-247.
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  44. added 2016-08-04
    Giulia Bonasio (2014). Aesthetic Pleasure: Cognition and Emotion in the Aesthetic Concepts. Remarks After Sibley’s Works. Rivista di Estetica 55:183-201.
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  45. added 2016-08-04
    Damien Freeman (2010). Aesthetic Experience as the Transformation of Pleasure. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 17 (1):56-75.
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  46. added 2016-08-04
    Roderick Beaton (2004). Erotic Pathos, Rhetorical Pleasure: Narrative Technique and Mimesis in Eumathios Makrembolites' "Hysmine & Hysminias"Ingela Nilsson. Speculum 79 (3):811-813.
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  47. added 2016-08-04
    Fabrizio Conca (2003). I. NILSSON, Erotic Pathos, Rhetorical Pleasure. Narrative Technique and Mimesis in Eumathios Makrembolites' Hysmine & Hysminias. Byzantinische Zeitschrift 95 (2).
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  48. added 2016-08-03
    Keren Gorodeisky (forthcoming). Rationally Agential Pleasure? A Kantian Proposal. In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: a History. Oxford University Press
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  49. added 2016-08-03
    Keren Gorodeisky, 19th Century Romantic Aesthetics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  50. added 2016-08-02
    Guy Bennett-Hunter (forthcoming). New Work on Ineffability: Review of “Ineffability and Its Metaphysics: The Unspeakable in Art, Religion, and Philosophy” by Silvia Jonas. [REVIEW] The Expository Times 128 (1).
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