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  1. Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze (ed.) (1998). African Philosophy: An Anthology. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Bringing together canonical philosophical texts from African, African-American, Afro-Caribbean, and Black European thinkers, this major new anthology is designed to serve both as a textbook and as the authoritative reference volume in Africana philosophical and cultural studies.
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  2. Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze (ed.) (1997). Postcolonial African Philosophy: A Critical Reader. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Postcolonial African Philosophy: A Critical Reader sets out a timely and powerful agenda for contemporary African, Afro-Caribbean, and African American philosophy.
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  3. Lewis R. Gordon (2008). An Introduction to Africana Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this undergraduate textbook Lewis R. Gordon offers the first comprehensive treatment of Africana philosophy, beginning with the emergence of an Africana (i.e. African diasporic) consciousness in the Afro-Arabic world of the Middle Ages. He argues that much of modern thought emerged out of early conflicts between Islam and Christianity that culminated in the expulsion of the Moors from the Iberian Peninsula, and from the subsequent expansion of racism, enslavement, and colonialism which in their turn stimulated reflections on reason, liberation, (...)
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  4. Lewis R. Gordon (2008). An Introduction to Africana Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    In this undergraduate textbook Lewis R. Gordon offers the first comprehensive treatment of Africana philosophy, beginning with the emergence of an Africana consciousness in the Afro-Arabic world of the Middle Ages. He argues that much of modern thought emerged out of early conflicts between Islam and Christianity that culminated in the expulsion of the Moors from the Iberian Peninsula, and from the subsequent expansion of racism, enslavement, and colonialism which in their turn stimulated reflections on reason, liberation, and the meaning (...)
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  5. Bruce B. Janz (2011). Philosophy in an African Place. Lexington Books.
    Philosophy in an African Place shifts the central question of African philosophy from "Is there an African philosophy?" to "What is it to do philosophy in this place?" This book both opens up new questions within the field and also establishes "philosophy-in-place", a mode of philosophy which begins from the places in which concepts have currency and shows how a truly creative philosophy can emerge from focusing on questioning, listening, and attention to difference.
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  6. Chike Jeffers (ed.) (2014). Listening to Ourselves: A Multilingual Anthology of African Philosophy. State University of New York Press.
    _Contemporary African philosophy in indigenous African languages and English translation._.
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  7. Howard F. Jeter (2003). Reaching Out to the African Diaspora: The Need for Vision. Philosophia Africana 6 (1):1-4.
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  8. Mehmet Karabela (2011). Introduction to Africana Philosophy, Lewis Gordon, Cambridge University Press, 2008. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of African Studies 45 (3):605-608.
  9. Lee M. Brown (ed.) (2004). African Philosophy: New and Traditional Perspectives. Oxford University Press Usa.
    In the last two decades the idea of African Philosophy has undergone significant change and scrutiny. Some critics have maintained that the idea of a system of philosophical thought tied to African traditions is incoherent. In African Philosophy Lee Brown has collected new essays by top scholars in the field that in various ways respond to these criticisms and defend the notion of African Philosophy. The essays address both epistemological and metaphysical issues that are specific to the traditional conceptual languages (...)
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  10. Charles W. Mills (2016). Better Dread Than Red: High‐Brown Passing in John Hearne's Voices Under The Window. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (4).
    In his pioneering Caliban's Reason: Introducing Afro-Caribbean Philosophy, Paget Henry points out that because of the region's colonial history, Caribbean philosophy is far more often found ‘embedded’ in other discourses, such as literature, than in explicit theorising. Following Henry's lead, I seek to find the philosophical ‘moral of the story’ of Voices Under the Window, the 1955 first novel of the late Jamaican writer John Hearne, which some critics regard as his best work. In a novel with significant autobiographical elements, (...)
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  11. Yusef Waghid (2013). African Philosophy of Education Reconsidered: On Being Human. Routledge.
    Much of the literature on the African philosophy of education juxtaposes two philosophical strands as mutually exclusive entities; traditional ethnophilosophy on the one hand, and ‘scientific’ African philosophy on the other. While traditional ethnophilosophy is associated with the cultural artefacts, narratives, folklore and music of Africa’s people, ‘scientific’ African philosophy is primarily concerned with the explanations, interpretations and justifications of African thought and practice along the lines of critical and transformative reasoning. These two alternative strands of African philosophy invariably impact (...)
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  12. Kevin J. Wetmore (2009). The 'Black Aegean' (B.) Goff, (M.) Simpson Crossroads in the Black Aegean. Oedipus, Antigone, and Dramas of the African Diaspora. Pp. Xii + 401, Ills. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2007. Cased, £65. ISBN: 978-0-19-921718-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):31-.
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  13. Kwasi Wiredu (ed.) (2008). A Companion to African Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume of newly commissioned essays provides comprehensive coverage of African philosophy, ranging across disciplines and throughout the ages. _ Offers a distinctive historical treatment of African philosophy. Covers all the main branches of philosophy as addressed in the African tradition. Includes accounts of pre-colonial African philosophy and contemporary political thought. _.
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  14. Kwasi Wiredu (ed.) (2008). A Companion to African Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume of newly commissioned essays provides comprehensive coverage of African philosophy, ranging across disciplines and throughout the ages. _ Offers a distinctive historical treatment of African philosophy. Covers all the main branches of philosophy as addressed in the African tradition. Includes accounts of pre-colonial African philosophy and contemporary political thought. _.
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  15. Yancy George (ed.) (2007). Philosophy in Multiple Voices. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    The scope of Philosophy in Multiple Voices provides the reader with eight philosophical streams of thought-African-American, Afro-Caribbean, Asian-American, Feminist, Latin-American, Lesbian, Native-American and Queer-that introduce readers to alternative, complex philosophical questions concerning gendered, sexed, racial and ethnic identities, canon formation, and meta-philosophy. The overriding theme of the text is that philosophy is pluralistic in voice, rich in diversity, and ought to valorize democratic intellectual spaces of philosophical engagement.
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