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  1. Robert Bernasconi (2001). Eliminating the Cycle of Violence: The Place of a Dying Colonialism Within Fanon's Revolutionary Thought. Philosophia Africana 4 (2):17-25.
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  2. Anna Carastathis (2010). Fanon on Turtle Island: Revisiting the Question of Violence. In Elizabeth A. Hoppe & Tracey Nicholls (eds.), Fanon and the Decolonization of Philosophy. Lexington (Rowman & Littlefield). 77.
    In this chapter, I explore the role of violence in colonial rule and its role in decolonization struggle by posing the question, “what is alive in Fanon’s thought?” What can Fanon tell us about white settler state power and Fourth World decolonization struggles? I explore the relevance of Fanon’s account to the ongoing colonial situation on the northern part of Anówara Kawennote (Turtle Island), occupied by Canada. In this analysis, I am informed by Kanien’kehaka (Mohawk) political philosopher Taiaiake Alfred. I (...)
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  3. Santiago Castro-Gómez (2002). The Cultural and Critical Context of Postcolonialism. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):25-34.
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  4. Maduabuchi Dukor (2005). African Philosophy the Great Debate on Deconstruction, Reconstruction and Cognition of African Philosophy. Philosophia 33 (1-4):5-53.
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  5. Emmanuel Chukwudi Eze (ed.) (1997). Postcolonial African Philosophy: A Critical Reader. Blackwell.
  6. G. J. Ferguson (2002). African Philosophy and Tradition: Not yet Postcolonial. Philosophia Africana 5 (1):43-53.
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  7. Mustapha Marrouchi (2003). The New/Old Idiot: Re-Reading Said's Contributions to Post-Colonial Studies. Philosophia Africana 6 (2):37-60.
    The old idiot wanted, by himself, to account for what was lost or saved; but the new idiot wants the lost, the incomprehensible, and the absurd to be restored to him. This is most certainly not the same persona; a mutation has taken place. And yet a slender thread links the two idiots, as if the first had to lose reason so that the second rediscovers what the other, in winning it, had lost in advance.
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  8. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Africanising Institutional Culture: What is Possible and Plausible. In Pedro Tabensky & Sally Matthews (eds.), Being at Home: Race, Institutional Culture and Transformation at South African Higher Education Institutions. University of KwaZulu-Natal Press.
  9. U. Okeja (2012). Space Contestations and the Teaching of African Philosophy in African Universities. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (4):664-675.
    The central issue addressed in this paper is the demand for improvements in the space granted to African philosophy in African universities. I offer and elaborate on the most basic reasons for this demand, which includes amongst others: 1) the obsoleteness of the reasons given for the current trend of focusing on Western philosophy 2) the fact that very few teachers of philosophy in Africa are focused mainly or only on Western philosophy in their academic productivity and 3) the disparity (...)
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  10. David S. Owen (2007). Whiteness in DuBois's-The Souls of Black Folk. Philosophia Africana 10 (2):107-126.
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  11. Mogobe Ramose (2003). I Doubt, Therefore African Philosophy Exists. South African Journal of Philosophy 22 (2):113-127.
    In this essay the question whether or not African philosophy exists is considered through an examination of the meaning of doubt. In St. Augustine and Descartes the basic presupposition with regard to doubt is the indubitable certainty that the doubting subject must exist before there can be any doubt at all. By parity of reasoning, African philosophy must first exist before it can doubt its own existence or be doubted by another. The origin and meaning of the term “Africa” is (...)
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  12. Neil Roberts (2004). Colonialism & its Legacies: New Directions in Contemporary Political Theory. Philosophia Africana 7 (2):89-97.
  13. Tsenay Serequeberhan (2003). The African Anti-Colonial Struggle: An Effort at Reclaiming History. Philosophia Africana 6 (1):47-58.
  14. Sharlene Swartz (2010). 'Moral Ecology' and 'Moral Capital': Tools Towards a Sociology of Moral Education From a South African Ethnography. Journal of Moral Education 39 (3):305-327.
    Research and pedagogy in the field of morality and moral education has long been dominated by philosophical and psychological disciplines. Although sociological studies and theorising in the field have not been absent, it has been limited and non?systematic. Drawing on a study that investigated the lived morality of a group of young South Africans growing up in the aftermath of Apartheid and in the townships of Cape Town, this paper surveys the historical contribution made by sociologists to the study of (...)
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  15. Ngugi W. Thiong’O. & Eunice Njeri Sahle (2004). Hegel in African Literature: Achebe's Answer. Diogenes 51 (2):63-67.
    There are three facets to the colonial project: a practice, a body of knowledge, and mental engineering. The third is the result of colonialism as text, for such a text bolsters the minds behind colonizing practices and is simultaneously a prison house for the minds of the colonized. The battle between the colonial text and its dialectical opposite, the anti-colonial text, is central to decolonization. Hegel (Phenomenology of Spirit) and Achebe (Things Fall Apart) are shown to exemplify this struggle.
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  16. Yusef Waghid & Paul Smeyers (2012). Taking Into Account African Philosophy: An Impetus to Amend the Agenda of Philosophy of Education. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (s2):1-5.
    Sceptics of an Africanisation of education have often lambasted its proponents for re-inventing something that has very little, if any, role to play in contemporary African society. The contributors to this issue hold a different view and, through the papers included in this issue, arguments are proffered in defence of an Africanisation of education on the African continent, particularly through the notion of ubuntu.Since the 1960s, Africana philosophy as an instance of Africanisation has emerged as a ‘gathering’ notion for philosophical (...)
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  17. Hywel Williams (2007). Neo-Tribalism and Postcolonial Melancholia. Philosophia Africana 10 (1):67-68.
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