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  1. B. Abanuka (2004). Philosophy and the Igbo World. Spiritan Publications.
    Preface -- The reality of God -- Status of the Gods -- Ancestors -- Human destiny and self-fulfillment -- Ozo as idealism -- Ozioko as realism -- Order -- Bibliography -- Index.
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  2. Leke Adeofe (2004). Personal Identity in African Metaphysics. In Lee M. Brown (ed.), African Philosophy: New and Traditional Perspectives. Oxford University Press 69--83.
  3. M. P. Adogbo (2000). The Spirit World of African Peoples. In Samuel U. Erivwo & Michael P. Adogbo (eds.), Contemporary Essays in the Study of Religions. Fairs & Exhibitions Nig. Ltd. 104--123.
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  4. Metaphysical Thinking In Africa (2002). Self as a Problem in African Philosophy. In P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.), Philosophy From Africa: A Text with Readings. Oxford University Press
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  5. C. Agulanna (2011). Eschatological Thinking and the Notion of the Afterlife in African Thought System. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 11 (1).
  6. Adebayo Aina (2013). Maduabuchi Dukor and the Legacies of Ontological Practices in African Thought System. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):168.
    A challenge human existence is confronted in contemporary society is the justification of a coherent social order. Most of these justifications have been grounded, over time, on natural approach to the neglect of the African ontological practice. This natural reference fails to account for the ontological practice premised on African belief system which reconciles the natural and spiritual aspects of human existence. The study adopts the analytic approach in philosophy which evolves a clarification of the ontological concept within the African (...)
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  7. Egbeke Aja (1994). Time and Space in African (Igbo) Thought. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (1):1-8.
    This paper is an attempt to articulate an African (Igbo) conception of space and time. Igbo terms and phrases are explained in light of their traditional, non-European cultural and linguistic background. Care is taken to present a distinctively African account, not a neo-colonial one. The African conceptions of space and time account for some African beliefs and practices regarding causality, including such widely misunderstood phenomena as divination, the “medicine man,” and “magic.”.
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  8. Michael Aina Akande (2013). A Re-Interpretation of African Philosophical Idea of Man and the Universe: The Yoruba Example. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):140.
    The concern of this paper is to argue against Maduabuchi Dukor’s conception of African philosophical ideas of man, universe and God as“theistic humanism”. Dukor’s submission is an anti-thesis of the claims by many pioneer scholars in African philosophy who claimed that if Africans do not live in a religious universe perhaps one can affirm that their universe is theistic. But indeed the Africans’ perceptions and attitude to life in their various manifestations reveal an idealistic metaphysical orientation without an attenuation of (...)
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  9. M. Akin-Makinde (1984). An African Concept of Human Personality: The Yoruba Example. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 7 (3):189-200.
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  10. J. -L. Amselle (1997). Salvation Through Writing: The N'ko, a West African Prophetism. Diogenes 45 (177):37-52.
  11. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2004). Akan and Euro-American Concepts of the Person. In Lee M. Brown (ed.), African Philosophy: New and Traditional Perspectives. Oxford University
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  12. G. E. Azenabor (forthcoming). Reincarnation in an African Metaphysics. Metaphysics, Phenomenology and African Philosophy. Ibadan: Hope Pub.
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  13. Matthew C. Chukwuelobe (2012). Eternal Return and Ilo Uina—Nietzsche and Igbo African Thought Implications for Cross-Cultural Philosophizing. Philosophy Today 56 (1):39-48.
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  14. P. H. Coetzee & A. J. P. Roux (eds.) (1991). Philosophy From Africa. Oxford.
    From early sage philosophers to Senghor of Senegal and Biko of South Africa, African thinking has challenged the way we think. As we enter a new millenium, the perspectives provided in this volume offer wise and refreshing alternatives to problems of self and society, culture, aesthetics, metaphysics and religion. Out of Africa always something new, and in these pages contemporary problems of cross-cultural cognition and post-coloniality are not only addressed, but also enacted. The reader witnesses the collision and the coalescence (...)
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  15. P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.) (2003). The African Philosophy Reader: A Text with Readings. Routledge.
    The African Philosophy Reader, Second Edition , is a substantially revised and greatly enhanced collection of writings on African philosophy. Editors P.H. Coetzee and A.P.J. Roux have brought together thirty-seven philosophers, thirty-three of whom are black Africans, to present the most current philosophical discussions. Divided into eight sections, each with introductory essays, the selections offer rich and detailed insights into a diverse multinational philosophical landscape. Revealed in this pathbreaking work is the way in which traditional philosophical issues related to ethics, (...)
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  16. P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.) (2002). Philosophy From Africa: A Text with Readings. Oxford University Press.
    This considerably revised second edition of Philosopy from Africa presents the current philosophical debate in Africa to a diverse, multicultural world. Its major themes include decolonization, Afro-centrism vs. Euro-centrism, the struggle for cultural freedoms on the continent, and the historic role of Black Consciousness in the liberation struggle. Writers and thinkers, Steve Biko, Kwasi Wiredu, Abiola Irele, Mogobe Ramose, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o and Wole Soyinka, among others, explore the debate surrounding: restitution and reconciliation in the post-colonial milieu, pressures on the (...)
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  17. George O. Cox (1992). The Ideology of Pan-African Scientific Communalism: (African Metaphysics Applied to the Demands of Independence, Modernisation and Development). Pan-African Pub. Co..
  18. Louis-jacques Bogaert Deogratias Biembe Bikopvano (2010). Reflection on Euthanasia: Western and African Ntomba Perspectives on the Death of a Chief. Developing World Bioethics 10 (1):42-48.
    Largely, the concept of energy or vital force, as first analysed by Placide Tempels in Bantu Philosophy , permeates most African ontology systems, worldviews and life views. The Ntomba Chief is chosen because of his above average vital force. This puts him in the position of intermediary between the Supreme Being, the ancestors, and his subordinates. The waning of his energy is incompatible with his position because his energy is that of his tribe. When installed, he takes an oath that, (...)
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  19. Adebola B. Ekanola (2006). Metaphysical Issues in African Philosophy. In Olusegun Oladipo (ed.), Core Issues in African Philosophy. Hope Publications
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  20. Adebola Babatunde Ekanola (2006). A Naturalistic Interpretation of the Yoruba Concepts of Ori. Philosophia Africana 9 (1):41-52.
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  21. Parker English (2006). Kalumba, Mbiti, and a Traditional African Concept of Time. Philosophia Africana 9 (1):53-56.
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  22. Charles M. Ezekwugo (2007). African Concept of Life and Death: To Live is Necessary, to Die is Inevitable. Cecta Nig..
  23. Bert Hamminga (2005). Language, Reality and Truth: The African Point of View. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 88 (1):85-116.
    In the traditional African view, words and sentences are not viewed as being liable to objective reflective truth/falsehood-judgments. It is not a person-word-reality-view, but a person-word-person-view: the sender's words are units of orally produced energy that have the power to improve or degenerate the receiver's vitality. Words received can make you more powerful by increasing your confidence and your control over your environment. But they can equally well harm (parts of) you, by discouraging you in certain endeavors. From the traditional (...)
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  24. Nozizwe Martha Jali, The African Perception of Death, with Special Reference to the Zulu : A Critical Analysis.
    99 leaves printed on single pages, preliminary pages and numberd pages 1-87. Includes bibliography. Digitized at 600 dpi grayscale to pdf format , using a Bizhub 250 Konica Minolta Scanner.
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  25. Godfrey Lienhardt (1985). Self: Public, Private, Some African Representations. In Michael Carrithers, Steven Collins & Steven Lukes (eds.), The Category of the Person: Anthropology, Philosophy, History. Cambridge University Press
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  26. Barbara Bloom Lloyd & John Gay (eds.) (1981). Universals of Human Thought: Some African Evidence. Cambridge University Press.
    This book was originally published in 1981 and the theme of universals attracted a great deal of attention in the decade preceding publication.
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  27. Thaddeus Metz (2016). Teaching African Philosophy Alongside Western Philosophy: Some Advice About Topics and Texts. South African Journal of Philosophy 35 (4).
    In this article, part of a special issue on ‘Transforming and Africanizing the Philosophy Curriculum’, I offer concrete suggestions about which topics, texts, positions, arguments and authors from the African philosophical tradition one could usefully put into conversation with ones from the Western. My aim is not to argue that one should teach by creating dialogue between African and Western philosophers, but rather is to provide strategic advice, supposing one sensibly adopts that goal.
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  28. Thaddeus Metz (2013). Questioning African Attempts to Ground Ethics on Metaphysics. In John Bewaji & Elvis Imafidon (eds.), Ontologized Ethics: New Essays in African Meta-Ethics. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers 189-204.
    In the literature on African moral philosophy, it is common to find normative conclusions about the way we ought to act directly drawn from purported metaphysical facts about the nature of ourselves and the world. For example, Kwame Gyekye, the most influential sub-Saharan political philosopher, attempts to defend moderate communitarianism, roughly the view that agents have strong duties to support others in ways that do not violate human rights, by contending that it follows from the dual nature of the self (...)
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  29. Thaddeus Metz (2011). Contemporary African Philosophy. In Duncan Pritchard (ed.), Oxford Bibliographies Online.
    A lengthy, annotated bibliography of the most important work in post-war African professional philosophy.
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  30. Chukwudum B. Okolo (1992). Self as a Problem in African Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 32 (4):477-485.
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  31. Sophie B. Oluwole (1992). Witchcraft, Reincarnation and the God-Head: (Issues in African Philosophy). Excel Publishers.
  32. Godfrey Igwebuike Onah (2005). Okere on the Self : A Hermeneutical Approach to an Ontological Question. In Theophilus Okere, J. Obi Oguejiofor & Godfrey Igwebuike Onah (eds.), African Philosophy and the Hermeneutics of Culture: Essays in Honour of Theophilus Okere. Distributed in North America by Transaction Publishers
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  33. Bongo Ondimba & A. Anicet (2010). Ubuntu Existentiel: Référentiel Identitaire Pour le Développement des Peuples Africains. Groupe Obany.
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  34. Y. Rash (1975). African Man and Two Classical Miths. Diogenes 23 (91):128-132.
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  35. A. P. J. Roux & P. H. Coetzee (eds.) (2001). Culture in Retrospect: Festschrift in Honor of E. D. Prinsloo. Unisa Press.
    In the past, African philosophy did not really form part of the philosophical scene in South Africa. It had no place on the programmes of the South African Philosophical Society and no articles on it were published in the South African Journal of Philosophy. However, it became clear to Prof. Prinsloo and the members of his Department of Philosophy at the University of South Africa that this situation was untenable. The department accepted the task as a departmental research project of (...)
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  36. A. P. J. Roux & P. H. Coetzee (eds.) (1999). Beyond the Question of African Philosophy - A Selection of Papers Presented at International Colloquia, Unisa, 1994-1996. Unisa Press.
  37. Jim Unah (ed.) (1996). Metaphysics, Phenomenology, and African Philosophy. Hope Publications.
  38. Johnny Washington (1993). A Commentary on Oshita O. Oshita's Analysis of the Mind-Body Problem in an African World View. Journal of Social Philosophy 24 (2):243-247.
  39. Issiaka Prosper Lalè ye (1970). La Conception de la Personne Dans la Pensée Traditionnelle Yoruba, Approche Phénoménologique. Préf. De Philippe Laburthe-Tolra. Herbert Lang.
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