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African Philosophy: Aesthetics
  1. E. O. Ako (1986). The African Inspiration of the Black Arts Movement. Diogenes 34 (135):93-104.
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  2. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1998). The Arts of Africa. In Richard English & Joseph Morrison Skelly (eds.), Ideas Matter: Essays in Honour of Connor Cruise o’Brien. Poolberg. 251-264.
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  3. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1995). Why Africa? Why Art? In Tom Phillips (ed.), Africa: The Art of a Continent. Royal Academy. 21-26.
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  4. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1984). An Aesthetics for Adornment in Some African Cultures. In Beauty by Design: The Aesthetics of African Adornment. African-American Institute. 15-19.
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  5. J. Binet (1980). The Contribution and the Influence of Black African Cinema. Diogenes 28 (110):66-82.
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  6. Daniel J. Crowley (1966). An African Aesthetic. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (4):519-524.
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  7. Souleymane Bachir Diagne (2011). African Art as Philosophy: Senghor, Bergson, and the Idea of Negritude. Seagull Books.
    Le;opold Se;dar Senghor (1906–2001) was a Senegalese poet and philosopher who in 1960 also became the first president of the Republic of Senegal. In African Art as Philosophy , Souleymane Bachir Diagne takes a unique approach to reading Senghor’s influential works, taking as the starting point for his analysis Henri Bergson’s idea that in order to understand philosophers one must find the initial intuition from which every aspect of their work develops. In the case of Senghor, Diagne argues that his (...)
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  8. Jane Duran (2006). Yoruba Work and Art Categorization. Philosophia Africana 9 (1):35-40.
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  9. Parker English & Nancy Steele Hamme (1996). Using Art History and Philosophy to Compare a Traditional and a Contemporary Form of African Moral Thought. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (2):204-233.
  10. Nissio Fiagbedzi (2005). An Essay on the Nature of the Aesthetic in the African Musical Arts. S.N.].
  11. Douglas Fraser (1974). African Art as Philosophy. Interbook.
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  12. Robin James (2005). On Popular Music in Postcolonial Theory. Philosophia Africana 8 (2):171-187.
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  13. Albert Mosley (2003). Music in the Black Atlantic. Philosophia Africana 6 (1):23-30.
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  14. J. Murungi (1982). Towards an Understanding of African Art. Diogenes 30 (119):114-131.
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  15. Sarah Nuttall (ed.) (2006). African and Diaspora Aesthetics. Prince Claus Fund Library.
  16. Isidore Okpewho (1977). Principles of Traditional African Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (3):301-313.
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  17. Sheila J. Petty (2012). African Frameworks of Analysis for African Film Studies. In Saër Maty Bâ & Will Higbee (eds.), De-Westernizing Film Studies. Routledge.
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  18. L. S. Senghor & E. P. Halperin (1956). African-Negro Aesthetics. Diogenes 4 (16):23-38.
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  19. A. Sylla & M. Bertelsen (1998). Contemporary African Art: A Multilayered History. Diogenes 46 (184):51-70.
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  20. Dan Vaillancourt (2009). Beautiful/Ugly: African and Diaspora Aesthetics Edited by Nuttall, Sarah. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 67 (2):256-258.
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  21. Kariamu Welsh-Asante (ed.) (1993). The African Aesthetic: Keeper of the Traditions. Greenwood Press.
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African Philosophy: Epistemology
  1. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2006). How to Decide If Races Exist. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 106 (3):363–380.
    Through most of the twentieth century, life scientists grew increasingly sceptical of the biological significance of folk classifications of people by race. New work on the human genome has raised the possibility of a resurgence of scientific interest in human races. This paper aims to show that the racial sceptics are right, while also granting that biological information associated with racial categories may be useful.
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  2. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2006). The Politics of Identity. Daedalus 135 (4):15-22.
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  3. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2005). African Studies and the Concept of Knowledge. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 88 (1):23-56.
    This article summarizes my views on epistemological problems in African studies as I have expressed them previously in different contexts, mainly my book In My Father's House (1992), to which I refer the reader for further details. I start with an attempt to expose some natural errors in our thinking about the traditional-modern polarity, and thus help understand some striking and not generally appreciated similarities of the logical problem situation in modern western philosophy of science to the analysis of traditional (...)
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  4. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1995). Philosophy and Necessary Questions. In Safro Kwame (ed.), Readings in African Philosophy: An Akan Collection. University Press of America. 1-22.
  5. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1992). African Identities. In Bernard Boxill (ed.), Constructions Identitaires: Questionnements Theoriques Et Etudes de Cas. Actes du Celat 6 (May). Universite Laval.
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  6. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1992). Inventing an African Practice in Philosophy: Epistemological Issues. In V. Y. Mudimbe (ed.), The Surreptitious Speech: Presence Africaine and the Politics of Otherness 1947-1987. University of Chicago. 227-37.
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  7. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1992). Social Forces, 'Natural' Kinds. In Abebe Zegeye, Leonard Harris & Julia Maxted (eds.), Exploitation and Exclusion: Race and Class in Contemporary Us Society. Hans Zell. 1-13.
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  8. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1991). Is the 'Post' in 'Postcolonial' the 'Post' in 'Postmodern'? Critical Inquiry 17 (Winter):336-57.
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  9. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1990). But Would That Still Be Me? Notes on Gender, 'Race,' Ethnicity as Sources of Identity. Journal of Philosophy 87 (10):75-81.
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  10. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1990). Racisms. In David Goldberg (ed.), Anatomy of Racism. 3-17.
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  11. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1989). Race. In Frank Lentricchia & Tom McLaughlin (eds.), Critical Terms for Literary Study. University of Chicago. 274-87.
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  12. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1989). The Conservation of 'Race'. Black American Literature Forum 23 (Spring):37-60.
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  13. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1986). The Uncompleted Argument: Du Bois and the Illusion of Race. In Henry Louis Gates Jr (ed.), Race, Writing and Difference. University of Chicago Press.
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  14. J. M. Awouma (1972). The Myth of Age, Symbol of Wisdom in African Society and Literature. Diogenes 20 (80):63-79.
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  15. Elias K. Bongmba (2002). Levinas and Alterity : Cross-Cultural Implications for African Witchcraft Discourse. In Steven Shankman & Massimo Lollini (eds.), Who, Exactly, is the Other ?: Western and Transcultural Perspectives: A Collection of Essays. University of Oregon Books/University of Oregon Humanities Center.
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  16. Jacques Chatué (2012). L'afrique Noire Et le Biais Épistémologique. Éditions Clé.
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  17. Adam K. Arap Chepkwony (2011). Inaugural Lecture: Re-Discovering African Wholistic Approach to Life Ways of Acquiring and Appropriating Knowledge. Moi University Press.
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  18. Kwame Gyekye (1995). An Essay on African Philosophical Thought: The Akan Conceptual Scheme. Temple University Press.
    On the denial of traditional thought as philosophy Scholars, including philosophers, tend to squirm a little at the mention of African philosophy, ...
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  19. B. Hallen (1986/1997). Knowledge, Belief, and Witchcraft: Analytic Experiments in African Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
    First published in 1986, Knowledge, Belief, and Witchcraft remains the only analysis of indigenous discourse about an African belief system undertaken from within the framework of Anglo-American analytical philosophy. Taking as its point of departure W. V. O. Quine's thesis about the indeterminacy of translation, the book investigates questions of Yoruba epistemology and of how knowledge is conceived in an oral culture.
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  20. Bert Hamminga (2005). Epistemology From the African Point of View. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 88 (1):57-84.
    In the traditional African view, knowledge is not acquired by labor but "given" by the ancestors. Second, it is immediately social: not "I" know, but "we" know. Thirdly, knowledge is not universal but local tribal : other tribes have different knowledge. Knowledge has it "biological variations" like all other things in nature. The ensuing logic is worked out in this article. Modern African society, changed as it is by the advent of western thought, should be understood in the awareness of (...)
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  21. Clevis Headley (2004). Deligitimizing the Normativity of "Whiteness": A Critical Africana Philosophical Study of the Metaphoricity of "Whiteness". In George Yancy (ed.), What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge.
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  22. Paget Henry (2004). Whiteness and Africana Phenomenology. In George Yancy (ed.), What White Looks Like: African-American Philosophers on the Whiteness Question. Routledge.
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  23. Monday Lewis Igbafen (2006). Existential Issues in African Philosophy. In Olusegun Oladipo (ed.), Core Issues in African Philosophy. Hope Publications.
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  24. L. D. Keita (1994). On “African Modes of Thought and Economic Development”- a Reply to Parker English. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (1):170-179.
  25. Barbara Bloom Lloyd & John Gay (eds.) (1981). Universals of Human Thought: Some African Evidence. Cambridge University Press.
    This book was originally published in 1981 and the theme of universals attracted a great deal of attention in the decade preceding publication.
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  26. Thaddeus Metz (2013). Engaging with the Philosophy of D A Masolo. Quest 25:7-15.
    This is an introduction to the special issue of Quest devoted to D. A. Masolo’s latest book, Self and Community in a Changing World. It situates this book in relation to not only Masolo’s earlier research on African philosophy but also the field more generally, sketches the central positions of the contributions to the journal issue, and in light of them makes some critical recommendations for future reflection.
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  27. Sylvanos I. Nnoruka (1999). African Culture and the Quest for Truth. Philosophy Today 43 (4):411-422.
    In most African cultures, there is a definite and clear quest for truth through a critical method. Truth is a key value. It has moral, philosophical and social significance. One can subject an interlocutor's statements to methodic doubt and questioning. However, in some African cultures, the human intellect alone is not capable of understanding certain truth data thereby permitting the practice of divination. Nevertheless, most African cultures distinguish opinion (doxa) from (alatheia); emphasis is on objectivity rather than subjectivity. The methods (...)
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  28. Leszek Nowak (2005). On the Collective Subjects in Epistemology: The Marxist Case and a Problem for the African Viewpoint. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 88 (1):117-128.
    The idea of a collective, but not necessarily universal epistemological subject is not only inherent in African tradition but also in the sciences and humanities as understood in the western tradition. In this paper I propose to delineate this collective subject by means of the construction of the Marxian concept of a theoretical representative of a social class . This allows for avoiding a trap that is necessarily faced by any collectivist viewpoint.
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1 — 50 / 406