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  1. W. Emmanuel Abraham (1995). A Paradigm of African Society. In Safro Kwame (ed.), Readings in African Philosophy: An Akan Collection. University Press of America 39--65.
  2. A. Afolayan (2008). Rawls In The African Predicament: Some Theoretical Considerations. Journal of Philosophy and Culture 3 (1):22-52.
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  3. J. C. Achike Agbakoba (2010). Traditional African Political Thought and the Crisis of Governance in Contemporary African Societies. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (7):137-154.
    The aim of this paper is to show the relationship between the normative outlook and political philoso- phy of traditional societies on the one hand, and the crises of governance and leadership in contemporary African Societies, particularly subSaharan states, on the other. Although there are quite some differences in the quality of leadership and governance among sub-Saharan African states because of the different political and economic circumstances, this part of the globe taken as a whole remains underdeveloped in terms of (...)
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  4. Jc Achike Agbakoba (2010). Traditional African Political Thought and the Crisis of Governance in Contemporary African Societies. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (7):137-154.
  5. Joseph Thâeráese Agbasiere & Shirley Ardener (2000). Women in Igbo Life and Thought.
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  6. Anju Aggarwal (2008). Kwame Nkrumah. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:5-11.
    African philosophy in the twentieth century is largely the work of African intellectuals under the influence of philosophical traditions from the colonial countries. Among them are few names such as Amilcar Cabral, Franz Fanon, Kwame Nkrumah, and Julius Nyerere etc. This paper is an attempt to analyze the politicalphilosophy of Nkrumah, first President of Republic of Ghana in West Africa. The paper argues that from the African political and economic point of view Nkrumah advocated a socialist system created out of (...)
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  7. Egbeke Aja (1997). Crime and Punishment: An Indigenous African Experience. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (3):353-368.
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  8. Akpovoyomo S. Akpotor (2007). African System of Law and Western Values: Between Fixation and Change. In Temisan Ebijuwa (ed.), Philosophy and Social Change: Discourse on Values in Africa. Hope Publications 68.
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  9. Emmanuel Ifeanyi Ani (2014). A United States of Africa: Insights From Antifragility. Philosophia Africana 16 (2):95-117.
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  10. Emmanuel Ifeanyi Ani (2012). Is the Fate of Africa a Question of Geography, Biogeography and History? Open Journal of Philosophy 2 (4):203-212.
    This paper dwells on the debate on the question of what is/are responsible for African underdevelopment and, by extension, what will influence African development. The debate currently dwells on how much of development is human and how much is environmental, extraneous and beyond human control. Joseph Agbakoba thinks that development involves both nature and human agency, acknowledges the effect of nature, equally sees philosophy as a critique of worldview and ideology, and African philosophy as saddled with the critique of the (...)
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  11. Oyowe Oritsegbubemi Anthony (2013). Strange Bedfellows: Rethinking Ubuntu and Human Rights in South Africa. African Human Rights Law Journal 13 (1):103-124.
    Can an African ubuntu moral theory ground individual freedom and human rights? Although variants of ubuntu moral theory answer in the negative, asserting that the duties individuals owe the collective are prior to individual rights (since African thought places more emphasis on the collective), Metz’s recent articulation in this Journal of an African ubuntu moral theory promises to ground the liberal ideal of individual liberty. I pursue three distinct lines of argument in establishing the claim that Metz’s project fails to (...)
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  12. Michael Chugozie Anyaehie (2013). Appraisal of African Identity for Sustainable Development. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):150.
    Africa is the poorest continent in the world despite her huge human and material resources. She is at the periphery of global development. Some people attribute the African predicament to her experience of slavery and colonialism which distorted her identity and disoriented her values. But she is not the only continent that was colonised. Other colonised continents are already finding their bearing in global development. What is that unique factor about African identity that hinders her from having her own stake (...)
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  13. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2005). The Limits of Being Liberal. Philosophia Africana 8 (2):93-97.
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  14. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2001). Ethnic Identity as a Political Resource. In Teodros Kiros (ed.), Explorations in African Political Thought: Identity and Community. Routledge 45-54.
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  15. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2000). Liberty, Individuality and Identity. Critical Inquiry 27 (Winter):305-32.
  16. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1998). Race, Pluralism and Afrocentricity. Journal of Blacks in Higher Education 19 (Spring):116-18.
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  17. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1998). Afterword: How Shall We Live as Many? In Wendy Katkin, Ned Landsman & Andrew Tyree (eds.), Beyone Pluralism: The Conception of Groups and Group Identities in America. University of Illinois 243-59.
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  18. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1998). The Limits of Pluralism. In Arthur M. Melzer, Jerry Weinberger & M. Richard Zinman (eds.), Multiculturalism and American Democracy. University of Kansas Press 37-54.
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  19. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1997). Liberalism and the Plurality of Identity. In N. Cloete, M. W. Makgoba & D. Ekong (eds.), Knowledge, Identity and Curriculum Transformation in Africa. Maskew Miller Longman 79-99.
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  20. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1997). Identity: Political Not Cultural. In Marjorie Garber, Rebecca L. Walkowitz & Paul B. Franklin (eds.), Field Word: Sites in Literary and Cultural Studies. Routledge 34-40.
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  21. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1996). Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections. The Tanner Lectures on Human Values 17:51-136.
  22. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1996). Reconstructing Racial Identities. Research in African Literatures 27 (3):58-72.
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  23. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1986). Are We Ethnic? The Theory and Practice of American Pluralism. Black American Literature Forum:209-24.
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  24. Giovanni Arrighi (2002). The Lineages of Empire. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):13-23.
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  25. Idelber Avelar (2004). The Letter of Violence: Essays on Narrative, Ethics, and Politics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book traces the theory of violence from nineteenth-century symmetrical warfare through today's warfare of electronics and unbalanced numbers. Surveying such luminaries as Walter Benjamin, Frantz Fanon, Hannah Arendt, Paul Virilio, and Jacques Derrida, Avelar also offers a discussion of theories of torture and confession, the work of Roman Polanski and Borges, and a meditation on the rise of the novel in Colombia.
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  26. George Bn Ayittey (2010). Traditional Institutions and the State of Accountability in Africa. Social Research: An International Quarterly 77 (4):1183-1210.
    Mythology about Africa still persists. It served colonial interests to portray African natives as "savages" with no history and their indigenous institutions as "backward and primitive." Therefore, colonialism was "good" for them as it "civilized" them and freed them from their "terrible and despotic" traditional rulers. Of course, much of this mythology has been tossed into the trash bin. African natives not only had history but also viable traditional institutions which enabled them to survive through the centuries. Ghana, Mali, Songhai (...)
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  27. Franco Barchiesi (2004). Class, Social Movements and the Transformation of the South-African Left in the Crisis of 'National Liberation'. Historical Materialism 12 (4):327-353.
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  28. Barton (2013). The Hermeneutics of Identity in African Philosophical Discourse as a Framework for Understanding Ethnicity in Post-Genocide Rwanda. Philosophia Africana 15 (1):1-34.
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  29. Michael Battle (2009). Ubuntu: I in You and You in Me. Seabury Books.
    Ubuntu is an African way of seeing the world-and the people in it-as an intricate web of relationships.
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  30. Ahmed C. Bawa (2012). South African Higher Education: At the Center of a Cauldron of National Imaginations. Social Research: An International Quarterly 79 (3):669-694.
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  31. Tsehai Berhane-Selassie (2002). Democracy in Translation: Understanding Politics in an Unfamiliar Culture by Frederic Schaffer. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):99-102.
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  32. J. -G. Bidima (2008). African Cultural Diversity in the Media. Diogenes 55 (4):122-133.
    With the disenchantment with independence in Africa, economic failure, the crimes of the elites from the independence years, the paralysis of symbolism, and finally the states' loss of dynamism, the 1990s ushered in a so-called phase of democratization. This was about rethinking citizenship and the relationship to politics. This democratization was a response to the notion of diversity. This paper claims that the answer to this diversity issue fell far short of expectations and proceeds different examples taken from social, cultural (...)
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  33. David Bilchitz, Thaddeus Metz & Anthony Oyowe (forthcoming). Jurisprudence in an African Context. Oxford University Press.
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  34. W. Z. Billewicz & I. A. McGregor (1981). The Demography of Two West African (Gambian) Villages, 1951–75. Journal of Biosocial Science 13 (2):219-240.
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  35. Peter Brastis, Sefik Huseyin, William Matt McCarter & Joseph D. Osel (2012). International Journal of Radical Critique. International Journal of Radical Critique 1 (2):80-160.
    International Journal of Radical Critique is a peer-reviewed open-access journal of radical inquiry edited by international academics and intellectuals. IJRC publishes speculative interventions of analytical rigor and encourages philosophical, sociological, cultural, political, and media studies that provide revolutionary appraisals of historical and contemporary social issues.
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  36. Liam Campling (2004). Editorial Introduction to the Symposium on Marxism and African Realities. Historical Materialism 12 (4):51-66.
  37. W. K. Chagula (1968). The East African Academy. Minerva 6 (3):408-418.
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  38. Myriam J. A. Chancy (2010). Nostalgie D'Amour. Clr James Journal 16 (1):92-98.
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  39. P. H. Coetzee (2000). Metanationality, Comprehensive Democracy and Left Communitarian Rights. Koers; Bulletin for Christian Scholarship 65 (1):45-76.
    The Ghanaian philosopher, Kwame Gyekye, defends a concept of metanationality (a nationality transcending specific ethnic groups, yet accommodating them all on a basis of equality), which he regards as eminently suitable for application in multicultural societies. Metanationality distinguishes between first and second tier solidarity. Second tier solidarity entails commitment to the democratic institutions of the state and a system of rights to which individuals bear title. These rights include social and economic rights which are backup rights ensuring effective use of (...)
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  40. P. H. Coetzee & A. J. P. Roux (eds.) (1991). Philosophy From Africa. Oxford.
    From early sage philosophers to Senghor of Senegal and Biko of South Africa, African thinking has challenged the way we think. As we enter a new millenium, the perspectives provided in this volume offer wise and refreshing alternatives to problems of self and society, culture, aesthetics, metaphysics and religion. Out of Africa always something new, and in these pages contemporary problems of cross-cultural cognition and post-coloniality are not only addressed, but also enacted. The reader witnesses the collision and the coalescence (...)
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  41. P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.) (2003). The African Philosophy Reader: A Text with Readings. Routledge.
    The African Philosophy Reader, Second Edition , is a substantially revised and greatly enhanced collection of writings on African philosophy. Editors P.H. Coetzee and A.P.J. Roux have brought together thirty-seven philosophers, thirty-three of whom are black Africans, to present the most current philosophical discussions. Divided into eight sections, each with introductory essays, the selections offer rich and detailed insights into a diverse multinational philosophical landscape. Revealed in this pathbreaking work is the way in which traditional philosophical issues related to ethics, (...)
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  42. P. H. Coetzee & A. P. J. Roux (eds.) (2002). Philosophy From Africa: A Text with Readings. Oxford University Press.
    This considerably revised second edition of Philosopy from Africa presents the current philosophical debate in Africa to a diverse, multicultural world. Its major themes include decolonization, Afro-centrism vs. Euro-centrism, the struggle for cultural freedoms on the continent, and the historic role of Black Consciousness in the liberation struggle. Writers and thinkers, Steve Biko, Kwasi Wiredu, Abiola Irele, Mogobe Ramose, Ngugi Wa Thiong'o and Wole Soyinka, among others, explore the debate surrounding: restitution and reconciliation in the post-colonial milieu, pressures on the (...)
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  43. Pieter Coetzee (2002). Interventionism, Authoritarianism, and the Liberal State in South Africa. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):53-70.
    The liberal constitution in South Africa, which entrenches a certain kind of socio-economic organisation, renders systems of socio-economic organisation traditional to Africa, dysfunctional. These traditional communitarian systems contain within themselves structures endorsing harmony, mutuality and reciprocity as ground rules or values which distribute significant resources (both material and moral) to all agents in accordance with their socially determined deserts. The absence of these structures in South Africa contributes to a condition, inflamed by liberal structures, of rights paralysis under which agents (...)
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  44. Earl Conteh-Morgan (2000). State Integrity and Democratization: Issues, Values, and Paradoxes in African Development. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (4):488–496.
  45. J. Angelo Corlett (2001). Surviving Evil: Jewish, African, and Native Americans. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (2):207–223.
  46. Drucilla Cornell (2001). The Secret Behind the Veil: A Reinterpretation of "Algeria Unveiled". Philosophia Africana 4 (2):27-35.
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  47. George O. Cox (1992). The Ideology of Pan-African Scientific Communalism: (African Metaphysics Applied to the Demands of Independence, Modernisation and Development). Pan-African Pub. Co..
  48. Tommy J. Curry (2009). From Rousseau's Theory of Natural Equality to Firmin's Resistance to the Historical Inequality of Races. Clr James Journal 15 (1):135-163.
  49. Jacques Derrida (2005). Uprooted African I Am. Philosophia Africana 8 (1):79-82.
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  50. H. Deschamps & J. H. Labadie (1956). Review Articles : African Societies in Transition. Diogenes 4 (15):121-125.
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