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  1. Egbeke Aja (1997). Crime and Punishment: An Indigenous African Experience. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 31 (3):353-368.
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  2. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2005). The Limits of Being Liberal. Philosophia Africana 8 (2):93-97.
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  3. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2001). Ethnic Identity as a Political Resource. In Teodros Kiros (ed.), Explorations in African Political Thought: Identity and Community. Routledge. 45-54.
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  4. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2000). Liberty, Individuality and Identity. Critical Inquiry 27 (Winter):305-32.
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  5. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1998). Afterword: How Shall We Live as Many? In Wendy Katkin, Ned Landsman & Andrew Tyree (eds.), Beyone Pluralism: The Conception of Groups and Group Identities in America. University of Illinois. 243-59.
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  6. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1998). The Limits of Pluralism. In Arthur M. Melzer, Jerry Weinberger & M. Richard Zinman (eds.), Multiculturalism and American Democracy. University of Kansas Press. 37-54.
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  7. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1998). Race, Pluralism and Afrocentricity. Journal of Blacks in Higher Education 19 (Spring):116-18.
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  8. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1997). Identity: Political Not Cultural. In Marjorie Garber, Rebecca L. Walkowitz & Paul B. Franklin (eds.), Field Word: Sites in Literary and Cultural Studies. Routledge. 34-40.
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  9. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1997). Liberalism and the Plurality of Identity. In N. Cloete, M. W. Makgoba & D. Ekong (eds.), Knowledge, Identity and Curriculum Transformation in Africa. Maskew Miller Longman. 79-99.
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  10. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1996). Reconstructing Racial Identities. Research in African Literatures 27 (3):58-72.
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  11. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1996). Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections. The Tanner Lectures on Human Values 17:51-136.
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  12. Kwame Anthony Appiah (1986). Are We Ethnic? The Theory and Practice of American Pluralism. Black American Literature Forum:209-24.
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  13. Giovanni Arrighi (2002). The Lineages of Empire. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):13-23.
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  14. Franco Barchiesi (2004). Class, Social Movements and the Transformation of the South-African Left in the Crisis of 'National Liberation'. Historical Materialism 12 (4):327-353.
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  15. J. -G. Bidima (2008). African Cultural Diversity in the Media. Diogenes 55 (4):122-133.
    With the disenchantment with independence in Africa, economic failure, the crimes of the elites from the independence years, the paralysis of symbolism, and finally the states' loss of dynamism, the 1990s ushered in a so-called phase of democratization. This was about rethinking citizenship and the relationship to politics. This democratization was a response to the notion of diversity. This paper claims that the answer to this diversity issue fell far short of expectations and proceeds different examples taken from social, cultural (...)
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  16. Liam Campling (2004). Editorial Introduction to the Symposium on Marxism and African Realities. Historical Materialism 12 (4):51-66.
  17. Pieter Coetzee (2002). Interventionism, Authoritarianism, and the Liberal State in South Africa. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):53-70.
  18. Earl Conteh-Morgan (2000). State Integrity and Democratization: Issues, Values, and Paradoxes in African Development. Journal of Social Philosophy 31 (4):488–496.
  19. J. Angelo Corlett (2001). Surviving Evil: Jewish, African, and Native Americans. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (2):207–223.
  20. Drucilla Cornell (2001). The Secret Behind the Veil: A Reinterpretation of "Algeria Unveiled". Philosophia Africana 4 (2):27-35.
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  21. H. Deschamps & J. H. Labadie (1956). Review Articles : African Societies in Transition. Diogenes 4 (15):121-125.
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  22. Marie Pauline B. Eboh (1996). Philosophical Essays: Critique of Social Praxis. Paragraphics.
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  23. Simeon Onyewueke Eboh (2004). Legal Theories: And the African Concept of Law. Heb-Uni-Tech Global Publishers.
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  24. Lorenzo Fioramonti (2005). Civil Societies and Democratization: Assumptions, Dilemmas and the South African Experience. Theoria 44 (107):65-88.
    The argument put forward by this article is not that democratization does not benefit from the activity of a vibrant civil society, but rather that academic research should address this relationship in a critical way. This article maintains that one should take care to distinguish between 'civil society' as an ideal-type concept that embodies the qualities of separation, autonomy and civil association in its pure form, and the factual world of 'civil societies' composed of associations that embody these principles to (...)
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  25. Tabor Fisher (2005). The Other Side of the Lockean Contract. Philosophia Africana 8 (1):51-77.
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  26. I. I. Gabriel (1997). Basic Schools in Jurisprudence: An African Perspective. Mono Expressions.
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  27. Nigel Gibson (2001). The Oxygen of the Revolution: Gendered Gaps and Radical Mutations in Frantz Fanon's a Dying Colonialism. Philosophia Africana 4 (2):47-62.
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  28. Patrick Giddy (2002). African Traditional Thought and Growth in Personal Unity. International Philosophical Quarterly 42 (3):315-327.
    In traditional African ethics the emphasis is on respect and hierarchy. This is underpinned by a conception of the person as normative, developmental, and communitarian. But in this conception the person is only problematically unified. Further elaboration is needed on how one’s motivational structure is critically integrated if the tradition is to be reformulated so as to meet the challenges of a liberal, and often relativist, global culture. The psychological and intersubjective conditions for such personal growth need to be spelled (...)
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  29. Daniel Goodey (2001). Isaac Julien. Frantz Fanon: Black Skin, White Mask. Philosophia Africana 4 (2):93-97.
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  30. Sirkku K. Hellsten (2008). Failing States and Ailing Leadership in African Politics in the Era of Globalization: Libertarian Communitarianism and the Kenyan Experience. Journal of Global Ethics 4 (2):155 – 169.
    The article discusses the Kenyan post-2007 elections political crisis within the framework of 'libertarian communitarianism' that integrates individualistic self-interest with traditional collectivist solidarity in the era of globalization in Africa. The author argues that behind the Kenyan post-election anarchy can be analyzed as a type of 'prisoner's dilemma' framework in which self-interested rationality is placed in a collectivist social contract setting. In Kenya, this has allowed political manipulation of ethnicity as well as bad governance, both of which have prevented the (...)
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  31. Simeon O. Ilesanmi (2004). Leave No Poor Behind: Globalization and the Imperative of Socio-Economic and Development Rights From an African Perspective. Journal of Religious Ethics 32 (1):71 - 92.
    Globalization is being celebrated in many circles as a distinctive achievement of our age, drawing peoples and societies more closely together and creating far greater wealth than any previous generations ever knew. While the first of these assertions is correct in the sense that societies and cultures are colliding, hitherto relatively closed horizons are opening up, and spaces and time are compressing, the second deserves critical interrogations. Using Africa's experience with globalization as a case study, this article argues that globalization (...)
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  32. Adele Jinadu (1980/1986). Fanon: In Search of the African Revolution. Distributed by Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    Different from other books on Fanon, this book approaches him as both a political philosopher and political sociologist of the African experience.
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  33. Karen Johnson (2009). Gender and Race: Exploring Anna Julia Cooper's Thoughts for Socially Just Educational Opportunities. Philosophia Africana 12 (1):67-82.
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  34. Messay Kebede (2004). Africa's Quest for a Philosophy of Decolonization. Rodopi.
    This book discovers freedom in the colonial idea of African primitiveness.
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  35. L. D. Keita (1994). On “African Modes of Thought and Economic Development”- a Reply to Parker English. Journal of Social Philosophy 25 (1):170-179.
  36. Laura Kunreuther (2006). "Pacification of the Primitive": The Problem of Colonial Violence. Philosophia Africana 9 (2):67-82.
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  37. Johan Lagerkvist (2008). Chinese Views on Africa's Development and Sino—African Cooperation: Guest Editor's Introduction. Contemporary Chinese Thought 40 (1):3-10.
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  38. V. M. Lloyd (2003). Steve Biko and the Subversion of Race. Philosophia Africana 6 (2):19-35.
  39. Filomeno Lopes (2009). E Se l'Africa Scomparisse Dal Mappamondo?: Una Riflessione Filosofica. Armando.
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  40. Archie Mafeje (1992). African Philosophical Projections and Prospects for the Indigenisation of Political and Intellectual Discourse. Sapes Books.
  41. Mustapha Marrouchi (2007). Islam and the West: Unequal Distance/ Unequal Difference. Philosophia Africana 10 (1):1-30.
    Can one divide human reality as indeed human reality seems to be genuinely divided, into clearly different cultures, histories, traditions, societies, even races, and survive the consequences humanly? By surviving the consequences humanly, I mean to ask whether there is any way of avoiding the hystility exoressed by the division, say, of men into "us" (Westerners) and "they" (Orientals) . . . designating in one's mind a familiar soace which is "ours" and an unfamiliar soace beyond "ours" which is "theirs. (...)
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  42. Ifeanyi A. Menkiti (2002). Philosophy and the State in Africa: Some Rawlsian Considerations. Philosophia Africana 5 (2):35-51.
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  43. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Ubuntu as a Constitutional Principle. In Stu Woolman (ed.), Constitutional Law of South Africa, 2nd Edition. Juta.
    A critical overview of the way ubuntu has figured into Constitutional law in South Africa and the way that it should.
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  44. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). African Political Philosophy. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley.
    I critically discuss contemporary work in African, i.e., sub-Saharan, political philosophy that has been written in English. I begin by providing an overview of the profession and discussing the aptness of focusing on African political philosophy as a distinct topic. Next, I highlight discussions that should be of interest to a political philosopher working anywhere in the world, focusing on ideas characteristic of the sub-Saharan region that are under-appreciated not merely for the purpose of comparative ethics, but also for substantive (...)
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  45. Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). A Theory of National Reconciliation: Some Insights From Africa. In Claudio Corradetti, Nir Eisikovits & Jack Rotondi (eds.), Theorizing Transitional Justice. Ashgate.
    In this contribution I articulate a theory of national reconciliation informed by salient sub-Saharan ideas about community, and apply it to a variety of topics salient in South African and other discourses on the topic, such as truth-telling, apology, forgiveness and amnesty, in order both to illustrate and motivate the theory and to shed light on these topics.
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  46. Thaddeus Metz (2014). Dignity in the Ubuntu Tradition. In Marcus Düwell (ed.), Cambridge Handbook on Human Dignity. Cambridge University Press. 310-18.
    I draw on ideas commonly advocated by adherents to ubuntu, the term often used to capture sub-Saharan morality, in order to spell out, and sometimes construct, understandings of human dignity that are worth taking seriously by professional ethicists, moral philosophers, jurisprudential scholars and Constitutional Courts anywhere in the world. In particular, I seek to articulate a theory of dignity grounded in African values that could serve as a genuine rival to the influential Kantian conception that currently dominates most intellectual reflection (...)
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  47. Thaddeus Metz (2014). In Search of Ubuntu: A Political Philosopher’s View of Democratic South Africa. In Busani Ngcaweni (ed.), Liberation Diaries: Reflections on 20 Years of Democracy. ch. 21.
    In this essay I recount how I have been hoping to see more ubuntu in South Africa’s institutions than had been present in the two dominant socio-politico-economic models across the world in the 20th century. I haven’t been expecting utopia from the past 20 years of democracy; I’ve just wanted something new to come out of Africa. I here relate my experience of learning that it is not always forthcoming, at least not as quickly as I would have liked. However, (...)
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  48. Thaddeus Metz (2014). African Values, Human Rights and Group Rights: A Philosophical Foundation for the Banjul Charter. In Oche Onazi (ed.), African Legal Theory and Contemporary Problems: Critical Essays. Springer. 131-51.
    A communitarian perspective, which is characteristic of African normative thought, accords some kind of primacy to society or a group, whereas human rights are by definition duties that others have to treat individuals in certain ways, even when not doing so would be better for others. Is there any place for human rights in an Afro-communitarian political and legal philosophy, and, if so, what is it? I seek to answer these questions, in part by critically exploring one of the most (...)
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  49. Thaddeus Metz (2012). Human Rights, African Perspectives. In Deen Chatterjee (ed.), Encyclopedia of Global Justice. Springer. 501-05.
    At least the three major academic debates one encounters about human rights in an African context are usefully framed in terms how they relate to community in various ways. Specifically, this entry first discusses disputes among moral anthropologists and political scientists about the extent to which human rights were present in pre-colonial, communal sub-Saharan societies; then it takes up ways in which group-based claims have significantly influenced human rights discourse and observance in post-war Africa; and finally it discusses how professional (...)
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  50. Thaddeus Metz (2012). African Conceptions of Human Dignity: Vitality and Community as the Ground of Human Rights. Human Rights Review 13 (1):19-37.
    I seek to advance enquiry into the philosophical question of in virtue of what human beings have a dignity of the sort that grounds human rights. I first draw on values salient in sub-Saharan African moral thought to construct two theoretically promising conceptions of human dignity, one grounded on vitality, or liveliness, and the other on our communal nature. I then argue that the vitality conception cannot account for several human rights that we intuitively have, while the community conception can (...)
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