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  1. Mona Abousenna (1995). Contemporary Philosophical Thinking in Africa and Asia in the Light of the Afro-Asian Philosophy Association (AAPA). Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (1):129-135.
  2. Laura Gillman (2014). Anancyism and the Dialectics of an Africana Feminist Ethnophilosophy: Sandra Jackson‐Opoku's The River Where Blood Is Born. Hypatia 29 (1):164-181.
    Although intersectionality has been widely disseminated across the disciplines as a tool to center women of color's developed perspectives on social reality, it has been notably absent in the scholarship of feminist philosophy and philosophy of race. I first examine the causes and processes of the exclusions of women of color feminist thought more generally, and of intersectionality in particular. Then, focusing attention on Black feminisms, I read Sandra Jackson-Opoku's 1997 novel, The River Where Blood Is Born, with and against (...)
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  3. Anthony Graybosch (1998). Blues Legacies and Black Feminism. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 26 (81):12-14.
African and African-American Philosophy
  1. Derrick P. Alridge (1999). Conceptualizing a du Boisian Philosophy of Education: Toward a Model for African-American Education. Educational Theory 49 (3):359-379.
  2. Anthony Appiah, Race, Culture, Identity: Misunderstood Connections. Tanner Lectures on Human Values.
  3. Bernard Boxill (1997). Populism and Elitism in African-American Political Thought. Journal of Ethics 1 (3):209-238.
    African-American political thought finds its premises in European philosophical traditions. But these traditions often challenge African-American humanity which African-American political thought defends. African-American political thought is therefore an extended commentary on the consistency of European philosophical traditions.
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  4. Tommy J. Curry (2013). The Fortune of Wells: Ida B. Wells-Barnett's Use of T. Thomas Fortune's Philosophy of Social Agitation as a Prolegomenon to Militant Civil Rights Activism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (4):456-482.
    Jesus Christ may be regarded as the chief spirit of agitation and innovation. He himself declared, “I come not to bring peace, but a sword.” One cannot delve seriously into the centuries of activism and scholarship against racism, Jim Crowism, and the terrorism of lynching without encountering the legacies of Timothy Thomas Fortune and Ida B. Wells-Barnett. Black scholars from the 19th century to the present have been inspired by the sociological and economic works of Fortune and Wells. Scholars of (...)
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  5. Tommy J. Curry (2011). On Derelict and Method. Radical Philosophy Review 14 (2):139-164.
    African-American/Africana philosophy has made a name for itself as a critical perspective on the inadequacies of European philosophical thought. While this polemical mode has certainly contributed to the questioning of and debates over the universalism of white philosophy, it has nonetheless left Africana philosophy dependent on these criticisms to justify its existence as “philosophical.” This practice has the effect of not only distracting Black philosophers from understanding the thought of their ancestors, but formulates the practice of Africana philosophy as “racial (...)
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  6. Eddie S. Glaude (2007). In a Shade of Blue: Pragmatism and the Politics of Black America. University of Chicago Press.
    In this timely book, Eddie S. Glaude Jr., one of our nation’s rising young African American intellectuals, makes an impassioned plea for black America to address its social problems by recourse to experience and with an eye set on the promise and potential of the future, rather than the fixed ideas and categories of the past. Central to Glaude’s mission is a rehabilitation of philosopher John Dewey, whose ideas, he argues, can be fruitfully applied to a renewal of African American (...)
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  7. Lewis R. Gordon (2003). African-American Existential Philosophy. In Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.), A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..
  8. Lewis R. Gordon (1999). Pan‐Africanism and African‐American Liberation in a Postmodern World: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (2):333-358.
    This review essay explores Josiah Young's project of developing a liberatory Pan-Africanism that is attuned to cultural diversity and Victor Anderson's advocacy of postmodern cultural criticism in African-American religious thought. After situating African-American religious thought as a branch of Africana thought, the author examines these two religious thinkers' work as an effort to forge a position on African-American religious thought--including its relation to theology--in an age where even theory is treated as a god that is about to die. At the (...)
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  9. Leonard Harris (2006). Alain L. Locke. In John R. Shook & Joseph Margolis (eds.), A Companion to Pragmatism. Blackwell Pub..
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  10. Mehmet Karabela (2011). Introduction to Africana Philosophy, Lewis Gordon, Cambridge University Press, 2008. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of African Studies 45 (3):605-608.
  11. G. Yancy (2011). African-American Philosophy: Through the Lens of Socio-Existential Struggle. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (5):551-574.
    In this article I argue that African-American philosophy emerges from a socio-existential context where persons of African descent have been faced with the absurd in the form of white racism. The concept of struggle, given the above, functions as both descriptive and heuristic vis-à-vis the meaning of African-American philosophy. Expanding upon Charles Mills’ concept of non-Cartesian sums, I demonstrate the inextricable link between Black lived experience, struggle, and the morphology of meta-philosophical assumptions and philosophical problems specific to African-American philosophy. Then, (...)
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  12. George Yancy (2004). Geneva Smitherman: The Social Ontology of African-American Language, the Power Of. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (4).
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Negritude
  1. Bentley Le Baron (1966). Negritude: A Pan-African Ideal? Ethics 76 (4):267-.
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  2. Souleymane Diagne, Négritude. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  3. Zekeh S. Gbotokuma (2009). Negritude Meets Daoism : Can Yin-Yang Rescue Senghor? In Jinfen Yan & David E. Schrader (eds.), Creating a Global Dialogue on Value Inquiry: Papers From the Xxii Congress of Philosophy (Rethinking Philosophy Today). Edwin Mellen Press.
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  4. A. Gerard (1964). Historical Origins and Literary Destiny of Negritude. Diogenes 12 (48):14-38.
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  5. A. Gerard & S. Alexander (1962). Humanism and Negritude: Notes on the Contemporary Afro-American Novel. Diogenes 10 (37):115-133.
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  6. Azzedine Haddour (2005). Sartre and Fanon: On Negritude and Political Participation. Sartre Studies International 11 (s 1-2):286-301.
    In the first part of this essay, in order to grasp the complex and ambivalent relation of Fanon with negritude, I will recover the context from which emerged the ideology of negritude by focusing on the views of Léopold Senghor and the ways in which these views determined Sartre's interpretation of the movement. I will also examine Sartre's Black Orpheus and the influence it had on Fanon, especially on his Black Skin, White Masks. In the second part, I will adumbrate (...)
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  7. Bentley Le Baron (1966). Négritude: A Pan-African Ideal? Ethics 76 (4):267-276.
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  8. J. Obi Oguejiofor (2009). Negritude as Hermeneutics. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 83 (1):79-94.
    While highlighting the inherent tension between the quest for universalization and the unavoidable particularity in philosophical hermeneutics, this essay argues against what it regards as the uncritical characterization of Leopold Sedar Senghor’s concept of “negritude” in terms of ethnophilosophy, a derogatoryterm employed in contemporary African philosophy to describe philosophy that is communal, and which can be sieved out from such genres as proverbs, wise sayings, and myths. It reviews the background and the contents of negritude, including its metaphysics and its (...)
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African/Africana Philosophy, Misc
  1. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2007). Some Suggestions for Developing an Africanist Phenomenological Philosophy of Science. In M. P. Banchetti-Robino & C. Headley (eds.), Shifting the Geography of Reason: Gender, Science and Religion. Cambridge Scholars Press.
  2. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino & Clevis Headley (eds.) (2007). Shifting the Geography of Reason: Gender, Science and Religion. Cambridge Scholars Press.
  3. Mehmet Karabela (2011). Introduction to Africana Philosophy, Lewis Gordon, Cambridge University Press, 2008. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of African Studies 45 (3):605-608.
  4. Lucius Outlaw (1997). Africana Philosophy. Journal of Ethics 1 (3):265-290.
    Africana Philosophy is a gathering notion used to cover collectively particular articulations, and traditions of particular articulations, of persons African and African-descended that are to be regarded as instances of philosophizing. (The notion is meant to cover, as well, the philosophizing efforts of persons not African or African-descended, efforts that are, nonetheless, contributions to the philosophizing endeavors that constitute Africana philosophy.) A central concern of the essay is the question whether there are characteristics of the philosophizing practices of persons identified (...)
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Pan-Africanism
  1. M. K. Asante (1998). The African American as African. Diogenes 46 (184):39-50.
  2. Lewis R. Gordon (1999). Pan‐Africanism and African‐American Liberation in a Postmodern World: A Review Essay. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 27 (2):333-358.
    This review essay explores Josiah Young's project of developing a liberatory Pan-Africanism that is attuned to cultural diversity and Victor Anderson's advocacy of postmodern cultural criticism in African-American religious thought. After situating African-American religious thought as a branch of Africana thought, the author examines these two religious thinkers' work as an effort to forge a position on African-American religious thought--including its relation to theology--in an age where even theory is treated as a god that is about to die. At the (...)
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