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  1. B. Abanuka (2011). A History of African Philosophy. Spiritan Publications.
  2. B. Abanuka (1994). A New Essay on African Philosophy. Spiritan Publications.
  3. Ali A. Abdi, Korbla P. Puplampu & George J. Sefa Dei (eds.) (2006). African Education and Globalization: Critical Perspectives. Lexington Books.
    Containing both theoretical discussions of globalization and specific case analyses of individual African countries, this collection of essays examines the intersections of African education and globalization with multiple analytical and geographical emphases and intentions.
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  4. Mona Abousenna (1995). Contemporary Philosophical Thinking in Africa and Asia in the Light of the Afro-Asian Philosophy Association (AAPA). Journal of Value Inquiry 29 (1):129-135.
  5. W. E. Abraham (1996). The Life and Times of Anton Wilhelm Amo, the First African (Black) Philosopher in Europe. In Molefi K. Asante & Abu S. Abarry (eds.), African Intellectual Heritage: A Book of Sources. Temple University Press 424-40.
  6. W. Emmanuel Abraham (1995). A Paradigm of African Society. In Safro Kwame (ed.), Readings in African Philosophy: An Akan Collection. University Press of America 39--65.
  7. Mohamed A. Abusabib (1997). African Art: An Aesthetic Inquiry. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 55 (4):433-435.
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  8. Rogaia Mustafa Abusharaf (2002). Local Knowledge and Ritual Reproduction in Village Societies: Educating Young African Women to 'Succeed in a World Authored by Men'. Radical Philosophy Review 5 (1):2002-2003.
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  9. Leke Adeofe (2004). Personal Identity in African Metaphysics. In Lee M. Brown (ed.), African Philosophy: New and Traditional Perspectives. Oxford University Press 69--83.
  10. African Aesthetics (1993). Kariamu Welsh-Asante. In Kariamu Welsh-Asante (ed.), The African Aesthetic: Keeper of the Traditions. Greenwood Press 153--249.
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  11. Adeshina Afolayan (2009). Resignifying the Universal: Critical Commentary on the Postcolonial African Identity and Development. Human Affairs 19 (4).
    The dimension of the debate on the relation between the universal and the particular in African philosophy has been skewed in favor of the universalists who argued that the condition for the possibility of an African conception of philosophy cannot be achieved outside the “universal” idea of the philosophical enterprise. In this sense, the ethnophilosophical project and its attempt to rescue the idea of an African past necessary for the reconstruction of an African postcolonial identity and development become futile. A (...)
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  12. Adeshina Afolayan (2006). Some Methodological Issues in the History of African Philosophy. In Olusegun Oladipo (ed.), Core Issues in African Philosophy. Hope Publications 21--40.
  13. Adeshina Afolayan (2006). The Language Question in African Philosophy. In Olusegun Oladipo (ed.), Core Issues in African Philosophy. Hope Publications
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  14. A. Agada (2013). African Philosophy and the Challenge of Innovative Thinking. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 5 (1):41-67.
    This paper argues that the continued emphasis on ethno-philosophy and the relative absence of intellectual passion and curiosity are the greatest challenges facing African philosophy. The paper rejects the racist lamentation of scholars such as Olufemi Taiwo who blame the West for Africa’s absence from the stage of world philosophy. It highlights the link between L.S. Senghor’s doctrine of negritude, the philosophy of Innocent Asouzu, and the emerging synthesis of consolationism to underline the fact that African philosophy has made some (...)
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  15. J. C. A. Agbakoba (2005). An Evaluation of Theophilus Okere's Conception of the Place of African Traditional Values in Contemporary African Societies. In Theophilus Okere, J. Obi Oguejiofor & Godfrey Igwebuike Onah (eds.), African Philosophy and the Hermeneutics of Culture: Essays in Honour of Theophilus Okere. Distributed in North America by Transaction Publishers
  16. J. C. Achike Agbakoba (2010). Traditional African Political Thought and the Crisis of Governance in Contemporary African Societies. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (7):137-154.
    The aim of this paper is to show the relationship between the normative outlook and political philoso- phy of traditional societies on the one hand, and the crises of governance and leadership in contemporary African Societies, particularly subSaharan states, on the other. Although there are quite some differences in the quality of leadership and governance among sub-Saharan African states because of the different political and economic circumstances, this part of the globe taken as a whole remains underdeveloped in terms of (...)
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  17. Jc Achike Agbakoba (2010). Traditional African Political Thought and the Crisis of Governance in Contemporary African Societies. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 3 (7):137-154.
  18. C. Agulanna (2011). Eschatological Thinking and the Notion of the Afterlife in African Thought System. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 11 (1).
  19. Adebayo Aina (2013). Maduabuchi Dukor and the Legacies of Ontological Practices in African Thought System. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):168.
    A challenge human existence is confronted in contemporary society is the justification of a coherent social order. Most of these justifications have been grounded, over time, on natural approach to the neglect of the African ontological practice. This natural reference fails to account for the ontological practice premised on African belief system which reconciles the natural and spiritual aspects of human existence. The study adopts the analytic approach in philosophy which evolves a clarification of the ontological concept within the African (...)
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  20. Egbeke Aja (2011). Igba Ekpe Festival Chants in Ohafia: Philosophy and an African Culture. Great Ap Express Publishers.
  21. Egbeke Aja (1996). The Supreme God in an African (Igbo) Religious Thought. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 3 (4):1-7.
    From African ontology, religious experiences, myths of creation, and language, I argue that even though Africans (Igbo) conceive of supreme deities, none of the adjudged supreme deities is identifiable with the Supreme God propagated by Christian missionaries and theologians. To translate, therefore, the names of African deities, such as Chukwu or Chineke, to mean the God preached by Christians is to yoke to the Igbo religious thought the concept “creation out of nothing,” which is alien to traditional African cosmology. Such (...)
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  22. Egbeke Aja (1994). Time and Space in African (Igbo) Thought. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (1):1-8.
    This paper is an attempt to articulate an African (Igbo) conception of space and time. Igbo terms and phrases are explained in light of their traditional, non-European cultural and linguistic background. Care is taken to present a distinctively African account, not a neo-colonial one. The African conceptions of space and time account for some African beliefs and practices regarding causality, including such widely misunderstood phenomena as divination, the “medicine man,” and “magic.”.
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  23. B. Ajibade (2007). Art, Religion and the Supernatural in an African World: The Limit of Horn's Model. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 8 (2).
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  24. B. Ajibade (2006). De-Racialising Intelligence, Human Potentiality and Consciousness: A Context for African Creative Gnosis. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 8 (1).
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  25. Michael Aina Akande (2013). A Re-Interpretation of African Philosophical Idea of Man and the Universe: The Yoruba Example. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):140.
    The concern of this paper is to argue against Maduabuchi Dukor’s conception of African philosophical ideas of man, universe and God as“theistic humanism”. Dukor’s submission is an anti-thesis of the claims by many pioneer scholars in African philosophy who claimed that if Africans do not live in a religious universe perhaps one can affirm that their universe is theistic. But indeed the Africans’ perceptions and attitude to life in their various manifestations reveal an idealistic metaphysical orientation without an attenuation of (...)
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  26. C. O. Akpan (2007). Traditional African Epistemic Categories and the Question of Rationality: A Case for Reconceptualization. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 7 (2).
  27. F. Amadi (2007). Public Information and African Traditional Communication Delivery System. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 9 (1).
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  28. Noel S. Anderson & Haroon Kharem (eds.) (2010). Education as Freedom: African American Educational Thought and Activism. Lexington Books.
    Education as Freedom is a groundbreaking edited text that documents and reexamines African-American empirical, methodological, and theoretical contributions to knowledge-making, teaching, and learning and American education from the nineteenth through the twenty-first century, a dynamic period of African-American educational thought and activism. Education as Freedom is a long awaited text that historicizes the current racial achievement gap as well as illuminates the myriad of African American voices and actions to define the purpose of education and to push the limits of (...)
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  29. Steffen Andreae (1998). African Philosophy, Traditional Yoruba Philosophy and Contemporary African Realities. [REVIEW] Ethical Perspectives 5 (2):169-170.
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  30. A. O. Anwana (2007). Ekpe: An Aspect of African Religious Practice. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 7 (2).
  31. K. C. Anyanwu (1989). The Problem of Method in African Philosophy. In C. S. Momoh (ed.), The Substance of African Philosophy. African Philosophy Projects' Publications 126.
  32. Leo Apostel (1981). African Philosophy: Myth or Reality? Story-Scientia.
  33. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2005). African Studies and the Concept of Knowledge. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 88 (1):23-56.
    This article summarizes my views on epistemological problems in African studies as I have expressed them previously in different contexts, mainly my book In My Father's House (1992), to which I refer the reader for further details. I start with an attempt to expose some natural errors in our thinking about the traditional-modern polarity, and thus help understand some striking and not generally appreciated similarities of the logical problem situation in modern western philosophy of science to the analysis of traditional (...)
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  34. Kwame Anthony Appiah (2004). African Philosophy and African Literature. In Kwasi Wiredu (ed.), A Companion to African Philosophy. Blackwell
  35. Appiah, K. Anthony & V. Y. Mudimbe (2003). The Impact of African Studies on Philosophy. In Robert Bates, V. Y. Mudimbe & Jean O.’Barr (eds.), The Impact of African Studies on the Disciplines. University of Chicago 113-38.
  36. Mary Jo Arnoldi, Christraud M. Geary & Kris L. Hardin (1996). African Material Culture. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
  37. M. F. Asiegbu (2005). Okere, Igbo Names and African Philosophy. In Theophilus Okere, J. Obi Oguejiofor & Godfrey Igwebuike Onah (eds.), African Philosophy and the Hermeneutics of Culture: Essays in Honour of Theophilus Okere. Distributed in North America by Transaction Publishers
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  38. Innocent Asouzu (2011). Ibuanyidanda , Communalism and Theory Formulation in African Philosophy. Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya 3 (2):9-34.
    This paper avers that most attempts at formulating viable theories in African philosophy are saddled with intrusions of ethnophilosophic and ethnocentric types: The author identifies this as the phenomenon of “unintended ethnocentric commitment”. He uses communalism, a socio-political theory in African philosophy, to illustrate his point. He further argues that overreliance on the method of synthetic deduction - as is widely practised in African philosophy - can impact adversely on the universal outreach of theories and limit our knowledge of the (...)
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  39. Innocent Asouzu (2004). The Method and Principles of Complementary Reflection in and Beyond African Philosophy. University of Calabar Press.
    Preface In his book, African Philosophy, Theophilius Okere, after arguing that the way to African philosophy is the path of hermeneutics of culture, ...
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  40. J. M. Assimeng (1997). Foundations of African Social Thought a Contribution to the Sociology of Knowledge.
  41. G. Azenabor (2011). Odera Oruka's Philisophic Sagacity: Problems and Challenges of Conservation Method in African Philosophy. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):69-86.
    This paper examines the implications and challenges of Odera Oruka’s conversation approach to the study of contemporary African philosophy as enunciated in his “Philosophic sagacity”. In Oruka’s method, African philosophy is conceived as a joint venture and product of both the ancient and modern Africanphilosophers. Consequently, it utilizes interview, discussion and dialogue.
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  42. G. Azenabor (2000). The Idea of African Philosophy in African Language. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 27 (3):321-328.
  43. G. E. Azenabor (2002). Understanding the Problems in African Philosophy. First Academic Publishers.
  44. Oladapo Jimoh Balogun (2013). A Redescriptive History of Humanism and Hermeneutics in African Philosophy. Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):105.
    The aim of this paper is to contribute to the on-going debate about self-redescription in the history of African philosophy using the method and theory of redescription. This method and theory of redescription has become the deep concern of not only Western philosophers but of many African philosophers which is markedly present in their agitated pursuits of wisdom. This self-redescription is always resiliently presented in the works of Kwasi Wiredu, Kwame Appiah, Gyekye Kwame, Olusegun Oladipo, Wole Soyinka, Sophie Oluwole, (...)
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  45. Oladele Abiodun Balogun (2008). Rethinking the Tasks of African Philosophy in the 21st Century. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 28:45-54.
    The flurry of debate that trailed the existence of African philosophy in the 1960s and 70s and the consequent demise of the controversies in the late 1990s have occasioned a periodiszation shift from traditional African philosophy to contemporary African philosophy. While the scope and nature of predominant issues inthese periods differ considerably, what ought to constitute the basis and shape the direction of discourse in contemporary African philosophy remain controversial. In this regard, this paper argues that rethinking African philosophy should (...)
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  46. Kevin Behrens (2010). Exploring African Holism with Respect to the Environment. Environmental Values 19 (4):465-484.
    Contrary to a pervasive presumption of anthropocentricism in African thought, I identify an emphasis on the interrelatedness or interconnectedness of everything in nature, and argue that this is best construed as a rejection of anthropocentrism, and as something similar in conception to, and yet distinct from, holist perspectives. I propose that this strand of African thought, suitably reconstructed, should be construed as providing the basis for a promising non-anthropocentric African environmentalism. I name this position 'African Relational Environmentalism', and suggest that (...)
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  47. Richard H. Bell (2002). Understanding African Philosophy: A Cross-Cultural Approach to Classical and Contemporary Issues. Routledge.
    Understanding African Philosophy serves as a critical guide to some of the most important issues in modern African philosophy. Richard Bell introduces readers to the complexity of Africa, the legacy of colonialism, the challenges of post independence Africa, and other recent developments in African Philosophy. Chapters discuss the value of African oral and written texts for philosophy, concepts of "negritude," "African socialism," and "race," as well as current discussions in international development ethics connected to poverty and human suffering. Two chapters (...)
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  48. Richard H. Bell (1989). Narrative in African Philosophy: Richard H. Bell. Philosophy 64 (249):363-379.
    P. O. Bodunrin, in his 1981 essay, asks: ‘Is there an African Philosophy, and if there is, what is it?’ This question has occupied centre stage among younger African intellectuals for about a decade now. The most articulate among these intellectuals, who are themselves philosophers, are Bodunrin , Kwasi Wiredu , H. Odera Oruka , Marcien Towa and Eboussi Boulaga , and Paulin Hountondji . These philosophers among others are in dialogue with one another and currently are seen to be (...)
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  49. John A. I. Bewaji (1995). Critical Comments on Pearce, African Philosophy, and the Sociological Thesis. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 25 (1):99-119.
    Pearce's "African Philosophy and the Sociological Thesis" makes very interesting reading. Why it is interesting is not because it advances the frontiers of philosophical discourse in Africa or globally but because it shows that certain unwarranted dispositions die hard and that deliberate ignorance, if that is what is displayed, is hard to cure. In this article the author comments on the following contentions made by Pearce: (1) philosophy has no social relevance and/or responsibility; (2) philosophy is purely a linguistic activity (...)
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  50. John Ayotunde Isola Bewaji (2012). Black Aesthetics: Beauty and Culture: An Introduction to African and African Diaspora Philosophy of Arts. Africa World Press.
    Introduction -- Biographical details -- The nature of the philosophic enterprise: initial issues -- Contemporary scholarship on arts -- Artistic expression in Africa -- Philosophy and artistic expression in Africa -- Arts, memory and identity -- Conclusion.
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