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African/Africana Philosophy

Edited by Barry Hallen (Morehouse College)
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  1. added 2016-05-27
    Fasiku Gbenga (2008). African Philosophy and the Method of Ordinary Language Philosophy. Journal of Pan African Studies 2 (3):100-116.
    One of the vibrant topics of debate among African and non-African scholars in the 20th and 21st centuries centered on the existence of African philosophy. This debate has been described as unnecessary. What is necessary is, if African philosophy exists, we should show it, do it and write it rather than talking about it, or engaging in endless talks about it. A popular position on the debate is that what is expected to be shown, done and written is philosophy tailored (...)
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  2. added 2016-05-27
    Fasiku Gbenga (2006). Yoruba Proverbs, Names and Consciousness. Journal of Pan African Studies 1 (4):60-63.
    This paper is an attempt to situate Yorùbá proverbs, names, role-expectations, aspirations and consciousness towards building and contributing to the development of a national consciousness. The paper proceeds with a critical exposition of the general nature of Yorùbá proverbs, an exploration of the dialectical relationship between Yorùbá proverbs and names, and argues that this relationship instantiates a descriptivist theory of reference of names in the philosophy of language, with concluding particulars that critically espouses the values and virtues embedded in selected (...)
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  3. added 2016-05-19
    Ward Jones & Thaddeus Metz (2016). The Politics of Doing Philosophy in Africa: A Conversation. In Mogobe Ramose (ed.), Contrasts and Contests about Philosophy. Routledge
    Reprint of an article first appearing in the South African Journal of Philosophy (2015).
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  4. added 2016-05-07
    Thaddeus Metz (2011). Recent Work in African Ethics. In Sharlene Swartz & Monica Taylor (eds.), Moral Education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Routledge 115-126.
    Reprint of an article that initially appeared in the Journal of Moral Education (2010).
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  5. added 2016-05-07
    Thaddeus Metz (2010). African Moral Theory and Public Governance: Nepotism, Preferential Hiring and Other Partiality. In Paul Omoyefa & Alex Antonites (eds.), Basic Applied Ethics: A Multidisciplinary Approach. VDM Verlag Dr Müller
    Reprint of a chapter that initially appeared in the anthology African Ethics (2009).
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  6. added 2016-04-27
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). A Bioethic of Communion: Beyond Care and the Four Principles with Regard to Reproduction. In Marta Soniewicka (ed.), The Ethics of Reproductive Genetics - Between Utility, Principles, and Virtues. Springer ch. 6.
    English-speaking research on morally right decisions in a healthcare context over the past three decades has been dominated by two major perspectives, namely, the Four Principles, of which the principle of respect for autonomy has been most salient, and the ethic of care, often presented as a rival to not only a focus on autonomy but also a reliance on principles more generally. In my contribution, I present a novel ethic applicable to bioethics, particularly as it concerns human procreation, that (...)
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  7. added 2016-04-27
    Thaddeus Metz (2014). Vitality, Community and Human Dignity in Africa. In Alex Michalos (ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research. Springer 6960-6966.
    Two values salient in the sub-Saharan tradition that are invoked to ground the superlative, equal worth of persons and the human rights to which they are entitled are, first, vitality or 'life-force' and, second, community or relationships of identity and solidarity. This entry, which draws heavily on an article appearing in Human Rights Review (2012), sketches these two conceptions of dignity and presents an overview of key strengths and weaknesses of them.
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  8. added 2016-04-27
    Thaddeus Metz (2011). The African Ethic of Ubuntu/Botho. In Sharlene Swarz & Monica Taylor (eds.), Moral Education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Routledge 7-24.
    In this chapter, a reprint of an article initially appearing in the Journal of Moral Education (2010), we provide a theoretical reconstruction of sub-Saharan ethics that we argue is a strong competitor to typical Western approaches to morality. According to our African moral theory, actions are right roughly insofar as they are a matter of living harmoniously with others or honouring communal relationships. After spelling out this ethic, we apply it to several issues in both normative and empirical research into (...)
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  9. added 2016-04-27
    Thaddeus Metz (2010). Human Dignity, Capital Punishment, and an African Moral Theory. In Luis Arroyo, Paloma Biglino & William Schabas (eds.), Towards Universal Abolition of the Death Penalty. Tirant Lo Blanch 337-366.
    In this chapter, a reprint of an article initially appearing in the Journal of Human Rights (2010), I spell out a conception of dignity grounded on African moral thinking that provides a plausible philosophical foundation for human rights, focusing on the particular human right not to be executed by the state. I first demonstrate that the South African Constitutional Court’s sub-Saharan explanations of why the death penalty is degrading all counterintuitively entail that using deadly force against aggressors is degrading as (...)
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  10. added 2016-03-24
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). The South African Student/Worker Uprisings in Light of Just War Theory. In Susan Booysen (ed.), #FeesMustFall! From Revolt to Review of Governance. Wits University Press
    I critically examine the South African university student and worker protests of 2015/2016 in light of moral principles governing the use of force that are largely uncontested in both the contemporary Western and African philosophies of just war, violence and threats. Amongst these principles are: “discrimination”, according to which force should be directed not towards innocent bystanders but instead should target those particularly responsible for injustice; “likely success”, meaning that, instead of being counter-productive, the use of force must be reasonably (...)
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  11. added 2016-03-17
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Light of Ubuntu: A Comprehensive Appraisal. In Mia Swart & Karin van Marle (eds.), Twenty Years On: Other Ways of Being and the South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
  12. added 2016-03-17
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Duties Towards Animals Versus Rights to Culture: Two Dimensions of Communion. In Luis Rodrigues & Les Mitchell (eds.), Multiculturalism, Race and Animals – Contemporary Moral and Political Debates. Palgrave Macmillan
  13. added 2016-03-13
    Thaddeus Metz (2016). Towards an African Moral Theory (Revised Edition). In Isaac Ukpokolo (ed.), Themes, Issues and Problems in African Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan ch. 6.
    A mildly revised version of an article first published in the Journal of Political Philosophy (2007).
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  14. added 2016-03-03
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Making Sense of Survivor’s Guilt: How to Justify It with an African Ethic. In Lungisile Ntsebeza & George Hull (eds.), Philosophy in Africa, Africa in Philosophy. TBA
    The default position in Western ethics is that survivor’s guilt is either irrational or not rational, i.e., that while survivor’s guilt might be understandable, it is not justified in the sense of there being good reason for a person to exhibit it. From a widely held perspective, for example, one ought to feel guilty only for having done wrong, and in a culpable way, which, by hypothesis, a mere survivor has not done. Typical is the following: ‘Strictly speaking, (...)
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  15. added 2016-03-03
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Ancillary Care Obligations in Light of an African Bioethic: From Entrustment to Communion. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 37.
    Henry Richardson has recently published the first book ever devoted to ancillary care obligations, which roughly concern what medical researchers are morally required to provide to participants beyond what safety requires. In it Richardson notes that he has presented the ‘only fully elaborated view out there’ on this topic, which he calls the ‘partial-entrustment model’. In this article, I provide a new theory of ancillary care obligations, one that is grounded on ideals of communion salient in the African philosophical tradition (...)
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