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African/Africana Philosophy

Edited by Barry Hallen (Morehouse College)
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  1. added 2016-06-25
    Lawrence Ogbo Ugwuanyi (ed.) (forthcoming). Nkowa Echiche Ndi Afrika Nke Okammuta Thaddeus Metz (African Morality in the Thought of Thaddeus Metz). Timeless Publishers.
    A collection of several previously published articles by Thaddeus Metz translated into Igbo, with an introduction by Prof L. O. Ugwuanyi of the University of Abuja.
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  2. added 2016-06-25
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Nkowa Echiche Ndi Afrika Nke okammuta Thaddeus Metz (African Morality in the Thought of Thaddeus Metz). Timeless Publishers.
    A collection of several articles on African ethics translated into Igbo, edited by Prof Lawrence Ogbo Ugwuanyi of the University of Abuja.
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  3. added 2016-06-04
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). Some Thoughts on How to Do Comparative Philosophy: Comments on David Kim (Tentative Title). Confluence: Online Journal of World Philosophies 7.
    Part of a symposium on the question, 'Are certain epistemological frameworks more congenial to comparative philosophy?'. The symposium is anchored by a contribution from Professor David Haekwon Kim, with me providing some critical reflections on it.
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  4. added 2016-06-04
    Thaddeus Metz (2016). How to Deal with Neglected Tropical Diseases in Light of an African Ethic. Journal on African Philosophy 12.
    Many countries in Africa, and more generally those in the Global South with tropical areas, are plagued by illnesses that the wealthier parts of the world (mainly ‘the West’) neither suffer from nor put systematic effort into preventing, treating or curing. What does an ethic with a recognizably African pedigree entail for the ways various agents ought to respond to such diseases? Of course, an African ethic requires much more contribution from the Western, ‘developed’ world. However, what else does it (...)
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  5. added 2016-05-27
    Fasiku Gbenga (2008). African Philosophy and the Method of Ordinary Language Philosophy. Journal of Pan African Studies 2 (3):100-116.
    One of the vibrant topics of debate among African and non-African scholars in the 20th and 21st centuries centered on the existence of African philosophy. This debate has been described as unnecessary. What is necessary is, if African philosophy exists, we should show it, do it and write it rather than talking about it, or engaging in endless talks about it. A popular position on the debate is that what is expected to be shown, done and written is philosophy tailored (...)
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  6. added 2016-05-27
    Fasiku Gbenga (2006). Yoruba Proverbs, Names and Consciousness. Journal of Pan African Studies 1 (4):60-63.
    This paper is an attempt to situate Yorùbá proverbs, names, role-expectations, aspirations and consciousness towards building and contributing to the development of a national consciousness. The paper proceeds with a critical exposition of the general nature of Yorùbá proverbs, an exploration of the dialectical relationship between Yorùbá proverbs and names, and argues that this relationship instantiates a descriptivist theory of reference of names in the philosophy of language, with concluding particulars that critically espouses the values and virtues embedded in selected (...)
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  7. added 2016-05-19
    Ward Jones & Thaddeus Metz (2016). The Politics of Doing Philosophy in Africa: A Conversation. In Mogobe Ramose (ed.), Contrasts and Contests about Philosophy. Routledge
    Reprint of an article first appearing in the South African Journal of Philosophy (2015).
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  8. added 2016-05-07
    Thaddeus Metz (2011). Recent Work in African Ethics. In Sharlene Swartz & Monica Taylor (eds.), Moral Education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Routledge 115-126.
    Reprint of an article that initially appeared in the Journal of Moral Education (2010).
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  9. added 2016-05-07
    Thaddeus Metz (2010). African Moral Theory and Public Governance: Nepotism, Preferential Hiring and Other Partiality. In Paul Omoyefa & Alex Antonites (eds.), Basic Applied Ethics: A Multidisciplinary Approach. VDM Verlag Dr Müller
    Reprint of a chapter that initially appeared in the anthology African Ethics (2009).
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  10. added 2016-04-27
    Thaddeus Metz (forthcoming). A Bioethic of Communion: Beyond Care and the Four Principles with Regard to Reproduction. In Marta Soniewicka (ed.), The Ethics of Reproductive Genetics - Between Utility, Principles, and Virtues. Springer ch. 6.
    English-speaking research on morally right decisions in a healthcare context over the past three decades has been dominated by two major perspectives, namely, the Four Principles, of which the principle of respect for autonomy has been most salient, and the ethic of care, often presented as a rival to not only a focus on autonomy but also a reliance on principles more generally. In my contribution, I present a novel ethic applicable to bioethics, particularly as it concerns human procreation, that (...)
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  11. added 2016-04-27
    Thaddeus Metz (2014). Vitality, Community and Human Dignity in Africa. In Alex Michalos (ed.), Encyclopedia of Quality of Life and Well-Being Research. Springer 6960-6966.
    Two values salient in the sub-Saharan tradition that are invoked to ground the superlative, equal worth of persons and the human rights to which they are entitled are, first, vitality or 'life-force' and, second, community or relationships of identity and solidarity. This entry, which draws heavily on an article appearing in Human Rights Review (2012), sketches these two conceptions of dignity and presents an overview of key strengths and weaknesses of them.
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  12. added 2016-04-27
    Thaddeus Metz (2011). The African Ethic of Ubuntu/Botho. In Sharlene Swarz & Monica Taylor (eds.), Moral Education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Routledge 7-24.
    In this chapter, a reprint of an article initially appearing in the Journal of Moral Education (2010), we provide a theoretical reconstruction of sub-Saharan ethics that we argue is a strong competitor to typical Western approaches to morality. According to our African moral theory, actions are right roughly insofar as they are a matter of living harmoniously with others or honouring communal relationships. After spelling out this ethic, we apply it to several issues in both normative and empirical research into (...)
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  13. added 2016-04-27
    Thaddeus Metz (2010). Human Dignity, Capital Punishment, and an African Moral Theory. In Luis Arroyo, Paloma Biglino & William Schabas (eds.), Towards Universal Abolition of the Death Penalty. Tirant Lo Blanch 337-366.
    In this chapter, a reprint of an article initially appearing in the Journal of Human Rights (2010), I spell out a conception of dignity grounded on African moral thinking that provides a plausible philosophical foundation for human rights, focusing on the particular human right not to be executed by the state. I first demonstrate that the South African Constitutional Court’s sub-Saharan explanations of why the death penalty is degrading all counterintuitively entail that using deadly force against aggressors is degrading as (...)
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