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  1. Marilyn McCord Adams (1987). Duns Scotus on the Goodness of God. Faith and Philosophy 4 (4):486-505.
    Over the past thirty years, analytical philosophers of religion have confronted the problem of evil in the guise of the atheistic argument from evil against the existence of God. Many have met it from the posture of defense, constructing logically possible morally sufficient reasons for divine permission of evils from the materials of religion-neutral value-theory. At best, such defenses vindicate divine goodness along the dimension “producer of global goods,” while neglecting the religiously more relevant dimension of His goodness to individual (...)
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  2. M. Saghir Al-Hasan (1958). Al-Farabi's Political Philosophy. Pakistan Philosophical Journal 1 (3):33.
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  3. Ilai Alon (2002). Al-Farabi's Philosophical Lexicon = Qamus Al-Farabi Al-Falsafi.
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  4. Allan Bäck (1983). Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's de Interpretatione. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):396-398.
  5. William F. Boggess (1970). Alfarabi and the "Rhetoric": The Cave Revisited. Phronesis 15 (1):86 - 90.
  6. Gina Marie Bonelli, Farabi's Virtuous City and the Plotinian World Soul: A New Reading of Farabi's «Mabadi' Ara' Ahl Al-Madina Al-Fadila».
    Happiness (sa'a>dah) materializes as the ultimate goal of man in Abu> Nas}r Muh{ammad b. Muh{ammad b. T{arkha>n al- Fa>ra>bi>'s Maba>di' A' Ahl Al-Madi>na Al-Fa>d}ila (Principles of the Views of the Citizens of the Best State). But happiness, i.e., happiness in this life and happiness in the afterlife, is only attainable by the virtuous citizen. The prevailing academic vision of Fa>ra>bi>'s Virtuous City essentially can be placed into two categories: either it is an ideal as found in Plato's Republic or it (...)
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  7. Rémi Brague (2003). Une Note Sur Les Sources Philosophiques du Ps.-Farabi, la Quiddité de L'Âme. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (2):239-241.
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  8. Herbert A. Davidson (1992). Al-Farabi, Avicenna, & Averroes on Intellect. Oxford University Press.
  9. Zh M. Abdil din, Mukash Seisembaevich Burabaev & Filosofiya Jene Pravo Institut ) (1984). Sotsial Nye, Eticheskie I Esteticheskie Vzgliady Al -Farabi. Nauka, Kazakhskoi Ssr.
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  10. Thérèse-Anne Druart (2010). Al-Fârâbî. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:1-17.
    The paper first presents the necessary background to appreciate al-Fârâbî’s views and his originality. It explains the issues Anicent philosophers faced: the natural vs. the conventional origin of language, the problem of ambiguous words, and the difficulty to express Greek thought into Latin. It then sketches andcontrasts the views of Christianity and Islam on the origin of language and the diversity of idioms. It argues that al-Fârâbî follows the philosophical tradition butdevelops it in sophisticated and original manner by telling the (...)
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  11. Richard Farabi & Walzer (1985). Al-Farabi on the Perfect State = Abu Nasr Al-Farabi's Mab Adi' Ar A'ahl Al-Mad Ina Al-F Adila. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  12. Stanley B. Farabi, Wilhelm Marrow & Kutsch (1960). Sharh Al-Farabi Li-Kitab Aristutalis Fi Al- Ibarah. Al-Matba Ah Al-Kathulikiyah.
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  13. Wilhelm Farabi, Stanley Kutsch, Marrow & Aristotle (1971). Sharh Al-Farabi Li-Kitab Aristutalis Fi Al- Ibarah. Dar Al-Mashriq.
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  14. Gad Freudenthal (2003). La Quiddité de l'Âme, Traité Populaire Néoplatonisant Faussement Attribué À Al-Farabi: Traduction Annotée Et Commentée. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 13 (2):173-237.
    The classic Arabic bibliographies ascribe to al-Farabi a treatise entitled Fi mahiyyat al-nafs (“On the Essence of the Soul”), of which no Arabic manuscript is known to exist. There is however a Hebrew text, translated from the Arabic by Zera[hudot]iah ben She'altiel [Hudot]en of Rome in 1284, which is ascribed to al-Farabi in all the manuscripts and which carries the title Ma'amar be-mahut ha-nefesh (“Treatise on the Essence of the Soul”). Since Steinschneider, this text is taken to be the translation (...)
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  15. Rafael Ramón Guerrero (2002). El intelecto agente en Al-Farabi. Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval 9:19-32.
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  16. W. K. C. Guthrie (1954). Alfarabius, Compendium Legum Platonis. Edidit Et Latine Vertit F. Gabrieli. Corpus Platonicum Medii Aevi, Plato Arabus Vol. III. (London: Warburg Institute. 1952. Pp. Xiv + 37 + 46. [REVIEW] Philosophy 29 (108):90-.
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  17. Muharrem Hafız (unknown). The Criticism Of Democracy in Plato and Farabi. Yeditepe'de Felsefe (Philosophy at Yeditepe) 7.
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  18. Robert Hammond (1947). The Philosophy of Alfarabi and its Influence on Medieval Thought. New York, Hobson Book Press.
    PREFACE HE purpose of this book is to present, in as brief and systematic a way, the whole philosophy of Alfarabi and the influence it exerted on Medieval ...
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  19. Nicholas L. Heer (1986). Al-Fārābī's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's De Interpretatione. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (3):118-119.
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  20. Desmond Paul Henry (1964). Al‐Farabi's Short Commentary on Aristotle's. Philosophical Books 5 (1):1-2.
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  21. Alfred L. Ivry (1988). Ai-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's de Interpretatione. Ancient Philosophy 8 (2):309-312.
  22. Damien Triffon Janos, Intellect, Substance, and Motion in Al-Farabi's Cosmology.
    This dissertation offers a new and comprehensive analysis of Abū Naṣr al-Fārābī's (d. 950) cosmology by focusing on various important issues that have been largely neglected by the modern scholarship. It provides an examination of the physical, metaphysical, and astronomical aspects of al-Fārābī's cosmology by adopting a multidisciplinary approach that takes into account the history of philosophy and the history of astronomy. Accordingly, my dissertation explores how al-Fārābī attempted to reconcile features of Ptolemaic astronomy with Aristotelian and Neoplatonic theories, an (...)
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  23. Nihat Keklik (1969). Isl'm Mant K Tarihi Ve F'r'bî Mant G. Edebiyat Fakültesi Bas Mevi.
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  24. Muhammad Ali Khalidi (2003). Al-Fārābi on the Democratic City. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):379 – 394.
    This essay will explore some of al-Farabı’s paradoxical remarks on the nature and status of the democratic city (al-madınah al-jama`ıyyah). In describing this type of non-virtuous city, Farabı departs significantly from Plato, according the democratic city a superior standing and casting it in a more positive light. Even though at one point Farabı follows Plato in considering the timocratic city to be the best of the imperfect cities, at another point he implies that the democratic city occupies this position. Since (...)
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  25. Farnaz Nazirzadah Kirmani (1996). Usul Va Mabadi-I Falsafah-I Siyasi-I Farabi Sharh-I Nazariyah-I Madinah-I Fazilah Ba Tatabiq Bar Ara -I Aflatun Va Aristu.
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  26. Mübahat Türker Küyel (1969). Aristoteles Ve F'r'bî'nin Varl K Ve Dü Sünce Ögretileri. Ankara Üniversitesi Bas Mevi.
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  27. Jacques Langhade (1994). Du Coran À la Philosophie la Langue Arabe Et la Formation du Vocabulaire Philosophique de Farabi. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  28. Ibrahim Madkur (1983). Abu Nasr Al-Farabi Fi Al-Dhikrá Al-Alfiyah Li-Wafatihi 950 M : Al-Kitab Al-Tadhkari. Al-Hay Ah Al-Misriyah Al- Ammah Lil-Kitab.
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  29. Nadia Maftuni (2011). Conceptualization of Religious Art in Farabi's Philosophy. Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 63.
    Farabi has placed artists as the carriers of religion in the second place in utopia and after the prophetic government. He believes that the angel of revelation emanates all intelligibles to the rational faculty of the Prophet and then to his imaginal faculty. Due to their low capabilities or habits, the public are incapable of the rational perception of happiness and the truth. Therefore, the Prophet , who himself enjoys intellectual mastery over all realities based on certain arguments, revealed their (...)
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  30. James E. Montgomery (1989). F. W. Zimmermann: Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's De Interpretatione. (Classical and Medieval Logic Texts, 3.) Pp. Clii + 287. Oxford: O.U.P. For the British Academy, 1981 (Paperback 1987). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (01):143-144.
  31. J. T. Moore (1963). "The Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle," by Alfarabi, Trans. Muhsin Muhdi. Modern Schoolman 41 (1):104-104.
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  32. Parviz Morewedge (1992). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy, And: The Poetics of Alfarabi and Avicenna (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):605-608.
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  33. Joshua Parens (1995). Metaphysics as Rhetoric: Alfarabi's Summary of Plato's "Laws". State University of New York Press.
  34. Joshua Parens & Joseph C. Macfarland (2011). Alfarabi, The Attainment of Happiness ; Alfarabi, Plato's Laws ; Avicenna, On the Divisions of the Rational Sciences. In Joshua Parens & Joseph C. Macfarland (eds.), Medieval Political Philosophy: A Sourcebook. Cornell University Press.
  35. Michael J. Sweeney (2009). Aquinas on Limits to Political Responsibility for Virtue. Review of Metaphysics 62 (4):819-847.
    Al-Farabi saw himself as inheriting from Aristotle the problem of limits to political responsibility for virtue. If the state possesses the authority to habituate citizens to virtue, what are the limits to that responsibility? Aristotle establishes two main limits: the family and the size of the state. Al-Farabi rejects both. Thomas Aquinas’s view of marriage as a sacrament, on the other hand, reinforces the Aristotelian position that the family is the most basic limit to public responsibility for virtue. In fact, (...)
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  36. T. (1982). Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's "De Interpretatione.". [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):212-213.
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  37. D. T.-A. (1982). Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's "De Interpretatione.". Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):212-213.
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  38. Daniel Tanguay (2013). How Strauss Read Farabi's Summary of Plato's "Laws". In Rafael Major (ed.), Leo Strauss's Defense of the Philosophic Life: Reading "What is Political Philosophy?". The University of Chicago Press.
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  39. Richard C. Taylor (1997). Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes, on Intellect. Philosophical Review 106 (3):482-485.
  40. Sadik Türker (2007). The Arabico-Islamic Background of Al-Fārābī's Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (3):183-255.
    This paper examines al-F?r?b?'s logical thought within its Arabico-Islamic historical background and attempts to conceptualize what this background contributes to his logic. After a brief exposition of al-F?r?b?'s main problems and goals, I shall attempt to reformulate the formal structure of Arabic linguistics (AL) in terms of the ontological and formal characteristics that Arabic logic is built upon. Having discussed the competence of al-F?r?b? in the history of AL, I will further propose three interrelated theses about al-F?r?b?'s logic, in terms (...)
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  41. Mostafa Younesie, Philosophical Ethics of Happiness: Rethinking Farabi’s Treatise “Attainment of Happiness”.
    In this paper in the context of philosophical ethics I want to explore the classical reception of Farabi from Happiness through Aristotle's Nicomachaean Ethics.
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  42. Mostafa Younesie, Co-Reading Aristotle’s Practical Reasoning.
    In Islamic Arabic /Persian thought speculations about ethics may be divided into textual / scriptural; theological; religious; and philosophical too. The “philosophical ethics” has within itself Socratic, Platonic, Aristotelian and neo-Platonic trends and versions with such main thinkers such as Farabi; Avicenna; and Averroes. Here we will concentrate on Farabi and those aspects of his speculations that are Aristotelian and can be reordered and arranged around “practical reasoning”.
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  43. Mostafa Younesie (2008). Farabi Method Towards Aristotleís Eudemonia. Skepsis 19 (1-2).
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  44. Mauro Zonta (2011). About Todros Todrosi's Medieval Hebrew Translation of Al-Fārābī's Lost Long Commentary/Gloss-Commentary On Aristotle's Topics, Book VIII. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (1):37-45.
    Among the many logical works by Ab? Nasr Muhammad al-F?r?b? (870?950), there are two commentaries on particular books or points of Aristotle's Topics, whose original Arabic text has been apparently lost. A number of quotations of one or both of them, translated into Hebrew, has been recently found in a philosophical anthology by a fourteenth-century Provençal Jewish scholar, Todros Todrosi. In this article, a detailed list of these quotations is given, and a tentative short examination of the contents of each (...)
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