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  1. Marilyn McCord Adams (1987). Duns Scotus on the Goodness of God. Faith and Philosophy 4 (4):486-505.
    Over the past thirty years, analytical philosophers of religion have confronted the problem of evil in the guise of the atheistic argument from evil against the existence of God. Many have met it from the posture of defense, constructing logically possible morally sufficient reasons for divine permission of evils from the materials of religion-neutral value-theory. At best, such defenses vindicate divine goodness along the dimension “producer of global goods,” while neglecting the religiously more relevant dimension of His goodness to individual (...)
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  2. Allan Bäck (1983). Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's de Interpretatione. Journal of the History of Philosophy 21 (3):396-398.
  3. William F. Boggess (1970). Alfarabi and the "Rhetoric": The Cave Revisited. Phronesis 15 (1):86 - 90.
  4. Herbert A. Davidson (1992). Al-Farabi, Avicenna, & Averroes on Intellect. Oxford University Press.
  5. Thérèse-Anne Druart (2010). Al-Fârâbî. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:1-17.
    The paper first presents the necessary background to appreciate al-Fârâbî’s views and his originality. It explains the issues Anicent philosophers faced: the natural vs. the conventional origin of language, the problem of ambiguous words, and the difficulty to express Greek thought into Latin. It then sketches andcontrasts the views of Christianity and Islam on the origin of language and the diversity of idioms. It argues that al-Fârâbî follows the philosophical tradition butdevelops it in sophisticated and original manner by telling the (...)
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  6. W. K. C. Guthrie (1954). Alfarabius, Compendium Legum Platonis. Edidit Et Latine Vertit F. Gabrieli. Corpus Platonicum Medii Aevi, Plato Arabus Vol. III. (London: Warburg Institute. 1952. Pp. Xiv + 37 + 46. [REVIEW] Philosophy 29 (108):90-.
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  7. Robert Hammond (1947). The Philosophy of Alfarabi and its Influence on Medieval Thought. New York, Hobson Book Press.
    PREFACE HE purpose of this book is to present, in as brief and systematic a way, the whole philosophy of Alfarabi and the influence it exerted on Medieval ...
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  8. Nicholas L. Heer (1986). Al-Fārābī's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's De Interpretatione. International Studies in Philosophy 18 (3):118-119.
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  9. Alfred L. Ivry (1988). Ai-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's de Interpretatione. Ancient Philosophy 8 (2):309-312.
  10. Muhammad Ali Khalidi (2003). Al-Fārābi on the Democratic City. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):379 – 394.
    This essay will explore some of al-Farabı’s paradoxical remarks on the nature and status of the democratic city (al-madınah al-jama`ıyyah). In describing this type of non-virtuous city, Farabı departs significantly from Plato, according the democratic city a superior standing and casting it in a more positive light. Even though at one point Farabı follows Plato in considering the timocratic city to be the best of the imperfect cities, at another point he implies that the democratic city occupies this position. Since (...)
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  11. James E. Montgomery (1989). F. W. Zimmermann: Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's De Interpretatione. (Classical and Medieval Logic Texts, 3.) Pp. Clii + 287. Oxford: O.U.P. For the British Academy, 1981 (Paperback 1987). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (01):143-144.
  12. J. T. Moore (1963). "The Philosophy of Plato and Aristotle," by Alfarabi, Trans. Muhsin Muhdi. The Modern Schoolman 41 (1):104-104.
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  13. Parviz Morewedge (1992). Logic and Aristotle's Rhetoric and Poetics in Medieval Arabic Philosophy, And: The Poetics of Alfarabi and Avicenna (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 30 (4):605-608.
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  14. Joshua Parens (1995). Metaphysics as Rhetoric: Alfarabi's Summary of Plato's "Laws". State University of New York Press.
    1 The Roots of the Laws Perhaps the most ready assumption of any reader of the Laws-it only because of its title-is that its primary purpose is to provide a ...
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  15. Joshua Parens & Joseph C. Macfarland (2011). Alfarabi, The Attainment of Happiness ; Alfarabi, Plato's Laws ; Avicenna, On the Divisions of the Rational Sciences. In Joshua Parens & Joseph C. Macfarland (eds.), Medieval Political Philosophy: A Sourcebook. Cornell University Press.
  16. Michael J. Sweeney (2009). Aquinas on Limits to Political Responsibility for Virtue. Review of Metaphysics 62 (4):819-847.
    Al-Farabi saw himself as inheriting from Aristotle the problem of limits to political responsibility for virtue. If the state possesses the authority to habituate citizens to virtue, what are the limits to that responsibility? Aristotle establishes two main limits: the family and the size of the state. Al-Farabi rejects both. Thomas Aquinas’s view of marriage as a sacrament, on the other hand, reinforces the Aristotelian position that the family is the most basic limit to public responsibility for virtue. In fact, (...)
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  17. D. T.-A. (1982). Al-Farabi's Commentary and Short Treatise on Aristotle's "De Interpretatione.". Review of Metaphysics 36 (1):212-213.
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  18. Daniel Tanguay (2013). How Strauss Read Farabi's Summary of Plato's "Laws". In Rafael Major (ed.), Leo Strauss's Defense of the Philosophic Life: Reading "What is Political Philosophy?". The University of Chicago Press.
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  19. Richard C. Taylor (1997). Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes, on Intellect. Philosophical Review 106 (3):482-485.
  20. Sadik Türker (2007). The Arabico-Islamic Background of Al-Fārābī's Logic. History and Philosophy of Logic 28 (3):183-255.
    This paper examines al-F?r?b?'s logical thought within its Arabico-Islamic historical background and attempts to conceptualize what this background contributes to his logic. After a brief exposition of al-F?r?b?'s main problems and goals, I shall attempt to reformulate the formal structure of Arabic linguistics (AL) in terms of the ontological and formal characteristics that Arabic logic is built upon. Having discussed the competence of al-F?r?b? in the history of AL, I will further propose three interrelated theses about al-F?r?b?'s logic, in terms (...)
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  21. Mauro Zonta (2011). About Todros Todrosi's Medieval Hebrew Translation of Al-Fārābī's Lost Long Commentary/Gloss-Commentary On Aristotle's Topics, Book VIII. History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (1):37-45.
    Among the many logical works by Ab? Nasr Muhammad al-F?r?b? (870?950), there are two commentaries on particular books or points of Aristotle's Topics, whose original Arabic text has been apparently lost. A number of quotations of one or both of them, translated into Hebrew, has been recently found in a philosophical anthology by a fourteenth-century Provençal Jewish scholar, Todros Todrosi. In this article, a detailed list of these quotations is given, and a tentative short examination of the contents of each (...)
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