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  1. Ronald Aronson (forthcoming). Albert Camus. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  2. Ronald Aronson (2005). Sartre contre Camus : le conflit jamais résolu. Cités 22 (2):53.
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  3. M. Bielawka (1996). Husserl and Camus: In Search of Time Accomplished: The Constructive Scanning of Life: The Spread and Horizons of Chronos and Kairos. Analecta Husserliana 48:37-43.
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  4. Joseph Bien (1999). Camus as Historian and as Historical Actor. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (1):1-16.
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  5. Edward L. Burke (1962). Camus and the Pursuit of Happiness. Thought 37 (3):391-409.
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  6. V. C. C. (1956). The Myth of Sisyphus and Other Essays. Review of Metaphysics 10 (2):359-359.
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  7. Albert Camus (2001). Democracy is an Exercise in Modesty. Sartre Studies International 7 (2):12-14.
    For the want of something better to do, I sometimes reflect on democracy (in the Paris subway, of course). As you know, there is confusion in people's minds about that useful notion. And since I like to side with the greatest number of people possible, I look for definitions that might be acceptable to the largest number. That's not easy, and I don't pretend to have succeeded. But it seems to me that certain useful approximations are possible. To be brief, (...)
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  8. F. F. Centore (1980). Camus, Pascal, and the Absurd. New Scholasticism 54 (1):46-59.
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  9. Sharad Chandra (1991). Camus and India. National Pub. House.
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  10. Sharad Chandra (1989). Albert Camus and Indian Thought. National Pub. House.
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  11. Ramona Cormier (1976). Some Implications of the Aesthetic Theory of Camus. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):181-187.
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  12. Dale Cosper (1990). Camus: A Critical Examination (Review). Philosophy and Literature 14 (2):402-404.
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  13. George Cotkin (2003). Existential America. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    Europe's leading existential thinkers -- Jean-Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, and Albert Camus -- all felt that Americans were too self-confident and shallow to accept their philosophy of responsibility, choice, and the absurd. "There is no pessimism in America regarding human nature and social organization," Sartre remarked in 1950, while Beauvoir wrote that Americans had no "feeling for sin and for remorse" and Camus derided American materialism and optimism. Existentialism, however, enjoyed rapid, widespread, and enduring popularity among Americans. No less (...)
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  14. Aidan Curzon-Hobson (2003). Between Exile and the Kingdom: Albert Camus and Empowering Classroom Relationships. Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (4):367–380.
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  15. Joseph M. de Torre (2004). Albert Camus and the Philosophy of the Absurd. Review of Metaphysics 57 (4).
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  16. Fpa Demeterio (2008). A Comparative Study on the Theme of Human Existence in the Novels of Albert Camus and F. Sionil Jose. Kritike: An Online Journal of Philosophy 2 (1).
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  17. David E. Denton (1964). Albert Camus: Philosopher of Moral Concern. Educational Theory 14 (2):99-127.
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  18. Jean-Philippe Deranty (2011). The Tender Indifference of the World: Camus' Theory of the Flesh. [REVIEW] Sophia 50 (4):513-525.
    The Tender Indifference of the World: Camus’ Theory of the Flesh Content Type Journal Article Pages 513-525 DOI 10.1007/s11841-011-0273-1 Authors Jean-Philippe Deranty, Macquarie University, North Ryde, NSW 2109, Australia Journal Sophia Online ISSN 1873-930X Print ISSN 0038-1527 Journal Volume Volume 50 Journal Issue Volume 50, Number 4.
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  19. Souleymane Bachir Diagne (2009). Review of David Sherman, Camus. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (4).
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  20. R. A. Duff & S. E. Marshall (1982). Camus and Rebellion: From Solipsism to Morality. Philosophical Investigations 5 (2):116-134.
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  21. Jane Duran (2007). The Philosophical Camus. Philosophical Forum 38 (4):365–371.
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  22. Harold A. Durfee (1955). Camus' Challenge to Modern Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 14 (2):201-205.
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  23. William E. Duvall (2011). The Sartre–Camus Quarrel and the Fall of the French Intellectual. The European Legacy 16 (5):579 - 585.
    Over the past thirty years, the disappearance, if not the death, of the intellectual in France has been the focus of significant conversation and debate. Yet a good bit earlier, two writers who epitomized that very figure of the intellectual, Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus, in works written after their bitter break, seemed to have already sensed this decline. The present essay explores what Camus's novel La Chute [The fall] and Sartre's autobiography Les Mots [The words] share thematically and, in (...)
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  24. Gene Fendt (1995). God Is Love, Therefore There Is Evil. Philosophy and Theology 9 (1/2):3-12.
    This paper attempts to explicate the philosophical and theological premisses involved in Fr. Paneloux’s second sermon in Camus’ The Plague. In that sermon Fr. Paneloux says that the suffering of children is our bread of affliction. The article shows where one must start in order to get to that point, and what follows from it. Whether or not the argument given should be called a theodicy or a reductio ad absurdum of religious belief is an open question for a philosopher, (...)
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  25. Jacob Golomb (1995). In Search of Authenticity: From Kierkegaard to Camus. Routledge.
  26. Jeffrey Gordon (1984). Nagel or Camus on the Absurd? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 45 (1):15-28.
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  27. Ignacio L. Gotz (1987). Camus and the Art of Teaching. Educational Theory 37 (3):265-276.
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  28. Russell Grigg (2011). Albert Camus – Novelist and Philosopher for Our Time. Sophia 50 (4):509-511.
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  29. Russell Grigg (2011). The Trial of Albert Camus. Sophia 50 (4):593-602.
    The fiftieth anniversary of Camus’ death in 2010 was largely ignored in his native Algeria, reflecting the critical response to Camus’ writings that regards him as a colonialist writer and apologist for the French domination of his native Algeria. This critique also claims that Camus’ colonial attitudes are hidden and reinforced by a European attitude that sees him as dealing first and foremost with universal questions about the human predicament and existential isolation. However, Camus’ journalism shows an Algerian closely identified (...)
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  30. Thomas Hanna (1958). The Thought and Art of Albert Camus. Chicago, H. Regnery Co..
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  31. Patrick Henry (1984). Albert Camus, a Biography_, And: _Camus: A Critical Study of His Life and Work (Review). Philosophy and Literature 8 (1):104-118.
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  32. Jason Herbeck (2009). Review of John Foley, Albert Camus: From the Absurd to Revolt. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (8).
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  33. Annabel Herzog (2005). Justice or Freedom Camus's Aporia. European Journal of Political Theory 4 (2):188-199.
  34. Herbert Hochberg (1965). Albert Camus and the Ethic of Absurdity. Ethics 75 (2):87-102.
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  35. Gregory Hoskins (2007). Elements of a Post-Metaphysical and Post-Secular Ethics and Politics: Albert Camus on Human Nature and the Problem of Evil. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):141-152.
    My thesis is that Albert Camus offers key elements of a viable nonmetaphysical, post-secular ethical and political anthropology and explanation of evil. Idefend my thesis in two parts. First, I explicate and analyze Camus’s remarks on human nature and injustice primarily in his political essay The Rebel (1951). Camus offers a nonmetaphysical picture of human nature, inspired by the Greeks, as that out of which rebellion to oppression springs but also as that which frustrates any final resolution to the problems (...)
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  36. Monday Lewis Igbafen (2009). The Existentialist Philosophy of Albert Camus and Africa's Liberation. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 23 (2):235-247.
    This paper examines the practical utility of Albert Camus’ existentialist philosophy, especially in the context of the contemporary effort to improve the condition of human life and existence in Africa. The paper is a departure from prevailing mindset among some scholars and people of Africa that nothing good can be derived from Camus’ philosophy. In particular, the paper argues that the task of socio-political and economic transformation in today’s Africa has a lot to benefit from a critical and pragmatic engagement (...)
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  37. Carolyn M. Jones John Randolph LeBlanc (2003). Space|[Sol]|Place and Home: Prefiguring Contemporary Political and Religious Discourse in Albert Camus's The Plague. Contemporary Political Theory 2 (2):209.
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  38. J. Keunen (1960). Albert Camus and the Literature of Revolt. Philosophical Studies 10 (10):217-224.
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  39. Joseph J. Kockelmans (1972). Contemporary European Ethics. Garden City, N.Y.,Anchor Books.
    Spiritualist ethics: The problem of evil, by L. Lavelle. On conscience, or On the pain of having-done-it, by V. Jankélévitch. Value and immortality; and, Dangerous situation of ethical values, by G. Marcel. The concept of fallibility, by P. Ricoeur.--Axiological ethics: Ethics and metaphysics, by R. Le Senne. Good and evil, by H. Reiner. Values and truths, by R. Polin. Values as principles of action, by G. Gusdorf.--Three contemporary conceptions of humanism: Jean-Paul Sartre: Sartre on humanism, by J. J. Kockelmans. Moral (...)
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  40. George Kovacs (1975). The Philosophy of Death in Albert Camus. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 49:189-197.
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  41. Matthew Lamb (2011). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Albert Camus and Pierre Hadot. Sophia 50 (4):561-576.
    This paper compares Pierre Hadot’s work on the history of philosophy as a way of life to the work of Albert Camus. I will argue that in the early work of Camus, up to and including the publication of The Myth of Sisyphus , there is evidence to support the notions that, firstly, Camus also identified these historical moments as obstacles to the practice of ascesis, and secondly, that he proceeded by orienting his own work toward overcoming these obstacles, and (...)
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  42. Richard T. Lambert (1981). Albert Camus and the Paradoxes of Expressing a Relativism. Thought 56 (2):185-198.
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  43. Robert D. Lane (1984). Albert Camus: The Absurd Hero. Humanist in Canada 17 (4):85-89.
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  44. Robert D. Lane & Steven M. Lane, Finding Patterns in Hemingway and Camus: Construction of Meaning and Truth. Comparative Studies The Hemingway Society.
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  45. Quentin Lauer (1960). Albert Camus. Thought 35 (1):37-56.
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  46. John Randolph LeBlanc (2006). Memory and Justice: Narrative Sources of Community in Camus's The First Man. Philosophy and Literature 30 (1):140-157.
  47. John Randolph LeBlanc & Carolyn M. Jones (2003). Space/Place and Home: Prefiguring Contemporary Political and Religious Discourse in Albert Camus's The Plague. Contemporary Political Theory 2 (2):209-230.
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  48. Frank P. Lengers (1994). The Idea of the Absurd and the Moral Decision. Possibilities and Limits of a Physician's Actions in the View of the Absurd. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 15 (3).
    In reference to two central concepts of Albert Camus' philosophy, that is, the absurd and the rebellion, this article examines to what extent hisThe Plague is of interest to medical ethics. The interpretation of this novel put forward in this article focuses on the main character of the novel, the physician Dr. Rieux. For Rieux, the plague epidemic, as it is described in the novel, implies an unquestioning commitment to his patients and fellow men. According to Camus this epidemic has (...)
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  49. David Lawrence Levine (1977). Camus. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):195-197.
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  50. Dagmar C. G. Lorenz (1981). Albert Camus. Philosophy and History 14 (2):157-158.
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