This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Siblings:
222 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Sort by:
1 — 50 / 222
  1. Sloman Aaron (1971). Tarski, Frege and the Liar Paradox. Philosophy 46 (176):133-.
    A.1. Some philosophers, including Tarski and Russell, have concluded from a study of various versions of the Liar Paradox ‘that there must be a hierarchy of languages, and that the words “true” and “false”, as applied to statements in any given language, are themselves words belonging to a language of higher order’. In his famous essay on truth Tarski claimed that ‘colloquial’ language is inconsistent as a result of its property of ‘universality’: that is, whatever can be said at all (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. S. Arpaia (2006). On Magari's Concept of General Calculus: Notes on the History of Tarski's Methodology of Deductive Sciences. History and Philosophy of Logic 27 (1):9-41.
    This paper is an historical study of Tarski's methodology of deductive sciences (in which a logic S is identified with an operator Cn S , called the consequence operator, on a given set of expressions), from its appearance in 1930 to the end of the 1970s, focusing on the work done in the field by Roberto Magari, Piero Mangani and by some of their pupils between 1965 and 1974, and comparing it with the results achieved by Tarski and the Polish (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Gurgen Asatryan (2002). Arithmetical Identities in a 2‐Element Model of Tarski's System. Mathematical Logic Quarterly 48 (2):277-282.
    All arithmetical identities involving 1, addition, multiplication and exponentiation will be true in a 2-element model of Tarski's system if a certain sequence of natural numbers is not bounded. That sequence can be bounded only if the set of Fermat's prime numbers is finite.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Jamin Asay (2013). Tarski and Primitivism About Truth. Philosophers' Imprint 13 (17):1-18.
    Tarski’s pioneering work on truth has been thought by some to motivate a robust, correspondence-style theory of truth, and by others to motivate a deflationary attitude toward truth. I argue that Tarski’s work suggests neither; if it motivates any contemporary theory of truth, it motivates conceptual primitivism, the view that truth is a fundamental, indefinable concept. After outlining conceptual primitivism and Tarski’s theory of truth, I show how the two approaches to truth share much in common. While Tarski does not (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jamin Asay (2013). The Primitivist Theory of Truth. Cambridge University Press.
    Jamin Asay's book offers a fresh and daring perspective on the age-old question 'What is truth?', with a comprehensive articulation and defence of primitivism, the view that truth is a fundamental and indefinable concept. Often associated with Frege and the early Russell and Moore, primitivism has been largely absent from the larger conversation surrounding the nature of truth. Asay defends primitivism by drawing on a range of arguments from metaphysics, philosophy of language and philosophy of logic, and navigates between correspondence (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Abílio Azambuja (2006). Sobre a Concepção da Verdade Em Tarski. Abstracta 2 (1):24-61.
    The aim of this paper is to investigate whether Tarski’s truth definition explains the notion of truth as correspondence with reality and whether it is really a semantic definition of truth. I defend the view that, although Tarski succeeded in the task of constructing correct and adequate definitions, according to his own criteria of correctness and adequateness, the definitions obtained by his method neither are explanations of the main point of a correspondence theory of truth, the relationship between language and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Jody Azzouni (2005). Tarski, Quine, and the Transcendence of the Vernacular “True”. Synthese 142 (3):273 - 288.
    It is argued that the blind ascriptive role for the word true, its use, that is, in conjunction with descriptions of classes of sentences or with proper names of sentences (but not quote-names), is one which applies indiscriminately to sentences regardless of whether these are in languages we speak, can understand, or can translate into sentences that we do speak (and understand). Formal analogues of the ordinary word true as they arise in Tarskis seminal work, and in others, cannot replicate (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. David Barker-Plummer, Jon Barwise & John Etchemendy (2007). Tarski's World: Revised and Expanded. Center for the Study of Language and Inf.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Robert Barnard & Joseph Ulatowski (2013). Truth, Correspondence, and Gender. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (4):621-638.
    Philosophical theorizing about truth manifests a desire to conform to the ordinary or folk notion of truth. This practice often involves attempts to accommodate some form of correspondence. We discuss this accommodation project in light of two empirical projects intended to describe the content of the ordinary conception of truth. One, due to Arne Naess, claims that the ordinary conception of truth is not correspondence. Our more recent study is consistent with Naess’ result. Our findings suggest that contextual factors and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Jon Barwise & John Etchemendy (1992). The Language of First-Order Logic: Including the Windows Program Tarski's World 4.0 for Use with Ibm-Compatible Computers. [REVIEW] Center for the Study of Language and Inf.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Jared Bates (1999). Etchemendy, Tarski, and Logical Consequence. Southwest Philosophy Review 15 (1):47-54.
    John Etchemendy (1990) has argued that Tarski's definition of logical consequence fails as an adequate philosophical analysis. Since then, Greg Ray (1996) has defended Tarski's analysis against Etchemendy's criticisms. Here, I'll argue that--even given Ray's defense of Tarski's definition--we may nevertheless lay claim to the conditional conclusion that 'if' Tarski intended a conceptual analysis of logical consequence, 'then' it fails as such. Secondly, I'll give some reasons to think that Tarski 'did' intend a conceptual analysis of logical consequence.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Timothy Bays (2001). On Tarski on Models. Journal of Symbolic Logic 66 (4):1701-1726.
    This paper concerns Tarski’s use of the term “model” in his 1936 paper “On the Concept of Logical Consequence.” Against several of Tarski’s recent defenders, I argue that Tarski employed a non-standard conception of models in that paper. Against Tarski’s detractors, I argue that this non-standard conception is more philosophically plausible than it may appear. Finally, I make a few comments concerning the traditionally puzzling case of Tarski’s ω-rule example.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Luca Bellotti (2003). Tarski on Logical Notions. Synthese 135 (3):401 - 413.
    We try to explain Tarski's conception of logical notions, as it emerges from alecture of his, delivered in 1966 and published posthumously in 1986 (Historyand Philosophy of Logic 7, 143–154), a conception based on the idea ofinvariance. The evaluation of Tarski's proposal leads us to consider an interesting(and neglected) reply to Skolem in which Tarski hints at his own point of view onthe foundations of set theory. Then, comparing the lecture of 1966 with Tarski'slast work and with an earlier paper (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. A. Betti (1998). The Porohy on the Dnepr. LeÃsniewskian Roots of Tarski's Semantics. In TImothy Childers (ed.), The Logica Yearbook. Acadamy of Sciences of the Czech Republic. 99--109.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Arianna Betti (2008). Polish Axiomatics and its Truth: On Tarski's Lesniewskian Background and the Ajdukiewicz Connection. In Douglas Patterson (ed.), New Essays on Tarski and Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 44.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Arianna Betti (2004). Lesniewski's Early Liar, Tarski and Natural Language. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 127 (1-3):267-287.
    This paper is a contribution to the reconstruction of Tarski’s semantic background in the light of the ideas of his master, Stanislaw Lesniewski. Although in his 1933 monograph Tarski credits Lesniewski with crucial negative results on the semantics of natural language, the conceptual relationship between the two logicians has never been investigated in a thorough manner. This paper shows that it was not Tarski, but Lesniewski who first avowed the impossibility of giving a satisfactory theory of truth for ordinary language, (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. W. J. Blok & Don Pigozzi (1988). Alfred Tarski's Work on General Metamathematics. Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (1):36-50.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Daniel R. Boisvert (1999). The Trouble with Harrison's 'the Trouble with Tarski'. Philosophical Quarterly 50 (196):376-383.
    In ‘The Trouble with Tarski’, The Philosophical Quarterly, 48 (1998), pp. 1–22, Jonathan Harrison attacks ‘Tarski‐style’ truth theories for both formalized and natural languages, on the grounds that (1) truth cannot be a property of sentences; (2) if it could be, T‐sentences would have to be necessary truths, which they are not; and (3) T‐sentences are not necessarily true and can even can be false. I reply that (1) cannot be an objection to Tarskian truth theories, since these can be (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. John Burgess, Tarski's Tort.
    A revision of a sermon on the evils of calling model theory “semantics”, preached at Notre Dame on Saint Patrick’s Day, 2005. Provisional version: references remain to be added. To appear in Mathematics, Modality, and Models: Selected Philosophical Papers, coming from Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. H. G. Callaway (2008). Sense and Mode of Presentation. In , Meaning without Analyticity.
    Theories of linguistic meaning have been a major influence in twentieth century philosophy. This is due, in part, to the assumption that meaning is the crucial and interesting thing about language. To know the meaning of an expression is to understand it, and since understanding is central to philosophy in many different ways, it should be no surprise that the notion of meaning has often taken center stage. The aim of this paper is to briefly explore some influential views concerning (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Andrea Cantini (1980). A Note on Three-Valued Logic and Tarski Theorem on Truth Definitions. Studia Logica 39 (4):405 - 414.
    We introduce a notion of semantical closure for theories by formalizing Nepeivoda notion of truth. [10]. Tarski theorem on truth definitions is discussed in the light of Kleene's three valued logic (here treated with a formal reinterpretation of logical constants). Connections with Definability Theory are also established.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Josep Pla I. Carrera (1989). Alfred Tarski I la Teoria de Conjunts. Theoria 4 (2):343-417.
    The work on set theory made by A. Tarski in the years 1924-1950 is very interesting, but little know.We develope partial questions in set theory in the moment that A. Tarski intervenes and his contributionsand also influences.The principals aims in this development are:1. The axiom of choice [A.C.] and his equivalents;2. the general continuum hypothesis [G.C.H.] and the A.C.;3. the dual trichotomy principle;4. the inaccessible cardinals and his relation with the A.C. and the G.C.H.;5. the notion of finite set and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Josep Pla I. Carrera (1989). Alfred Tarski I la Teoria de Conjunts. Theoria 4 (2):343-417.
    The work on set theory made by A. Tarski in the years 1924-1950 is very interesting, but little know.We develope partial questions in set theory in the moment that A. Tarski intervenes and his contributionsand also influences.The principals aims in this development are:1. The axiom of choice [A.C.] and his equivalents;2. the general continuum hypothesis [G.C.H.] and the A.C.;3. the dual trichotomy principle;4. the inaccessible cardinals and his relation with the A.C. and the G.C.H.;5. the notion of finite set and (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Juao Luis Castro & Enric Trillas (1989). Sobre Preórdenes Y Operadores de Consecuencias de Tarski. Theoria 4 (2):419-425.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Charles Chihara (1998). Tarski's Thesis and the Ontology of Mathematics. In Matthias Schirn (ed.), The Philosophy of Mathematics Today. Clarendon Press. 157--172.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Alonzo Church (1999). Antinomies with That of Tarski. In A. D. Irvine (ed.), Bertrand Russell: Critical Assessments. Routledge. 96.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Alonzo Church (1976). Comparison of Russell's Resolution of the Semantical Antinomies with That of Tarski. Journal of Symbolic Logic 41 (4):747-760.
  28. Hannah Clark‐Younger (2014). Imperatives and the More Generalised Tarski Thesis. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 3 (4):314-320.
    J.C. Beall and Greg Restall's Generalised Tarski Thesis is a generalisation of the seemingly diverse conceptions of logical consequence. However, even their apparently general account of consequence makes necessary truth-preservation a necessary condition. Sentences in the imperative mood pose a problem for any truth-preservationist account of consequence, because imperatives are not truth-apt but seem to be capable of standing in the relation of logical consequence. In this paper, I show that an imperative logic can be formulated that solves the problem (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Alberto Coffa (1987). Carnap, Tarski and the Search for Truth. Noûs 21 (4):547-572.
  30. John Corcoran (2011). Valor de Verdad. In Luis Vega and Paula Olmos (ed.), Compendio de Lógica, Argumentación y Retórica. Editorial Trotta. 627--629.
    Down through the ages, logic has adopted many strange and awkward technical terms: assertoric, prove, proof, model, constant, variable, particular, major, minor, and so on. But truth-value is a not a typical example. Every proposition, even if false, no matter how worthless, has a truth-value:even “one plus two equals four” and “one is not one”. In fact, every two false propositions have the same truth-value—no matter how different they might be, even if one is self-contradictory and one is consistent. It (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. John Corcoran (1995). Tarski, Alfred.”. In Audi Robert (ed.), The Cambridge Dictionary of Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. John Corcoran (1991). REVIEW OF Alfred Tarski, Collected Papers, Vols. 1-4 (1986) Edited by Steven Givant and Ralph McKenzie. [REVIEW] MATHEMATICAL REVIEWS 91 (h):01101-4.
    Alfred Tarski (1901--1983) is widely regarded as one of the two giants of twentieth-century logic and also as one of the four greatest logicians of all time (Aristotle, Frege and Gödel being the other three). Of the four, Tarski was the most prolific as a logician. The four volumes of his collected papers, which exclude most of his 19 monographs, span over 2500 pages. Aristotle's writings are comparable in volume, but most of the Aristotelian corpus is not about logic, whereas (...)
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Barbara F. Csima, Antonio Montalbán & Richard A. Shore (2006). Boolean Algebras, Tarski Invariants, and Index Sets. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 47 (1):1-23.
    Tarski defined a way of assigning to each Boolean algebra, B, an invariant inv(B) ∈ In, where In is a set of triples from ℕ, such that two Boolean algebras have the same invariant if and only if they are elementarily equivalent. Moreover, given the invariant of a Boolean algebra, there is a computable procedure that decides its elementary theory. If we restrict our attention to dense Boolean algebras, these invariants determine the algebra up to isomorphism. In this paper we (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Bożena Czarnecka-Rej (2011). Anita Burdamn-Feferman, Solomon Feferman, Alfred Tarski. Życie i logika, przeł. Joanna Golińska-Pilarek, Marian Srebrny, Warszawa 2009, ss. 475. [REVIEW] Roczniki Filozoficzne:79-84.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Janusz Czelakowski & Grzegorz Malinowski (1985). Key Notions of Tarski's Methodology of Deductive Systems. Studia Logica 44 (4):321 - 351.
    The aim of the article is to outline the historical background and the present state of the methodology of deductive systems invented by Alfred Tarski in the thirties. Key notions of Tarski's methodology are presented and discussed through, the recent development of the original concepts and ideas.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Giovanna D'Agostino & Marco Hollenberg (2000). Logical Questions Concerning the Μ-Calculus: Interpolation, Lyndon and Los-Tarski. Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (1):310-332.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Wagner de Campos Sanz (2001). Acerca Do Conceito de Consequência Lógica (Tarski, Alfred). Princípios: Revista de Filosofia 8 (10):11.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. David DeVidi & Graham Solomon (1999). Tarski on “Essentially Richer” Metalanguages. Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (1):1-28.
    It is well known that Tarski proved a result which can be stated roughly as: no sufficiently rich, consistent, classical language can contain its own truth definition. Tarski's way around this problem is to deal with two languages at a time, an object language for which we are defining truth and a metalanguage in which the definition occurs. An obvious question then is: under what conditions can we construct a definition of truth for a given object language. Tarski claims that (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. John Doner & Wilfrid Hodges (1988). Alfred Tarski and Decidable Theories. Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (1):20-35.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Jim Edwards (2003). Reduction and Tarski's Definition of Logical Consequence. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 44 (1):49-62.
    In his classic 1936 paper Tarski sought to motivate his definition of logical consequence by appeal to the inference form: P(0), P(1), . . ., P(n), . . . therefore ∀nP(n). This is prima facie puzzling because these inferences are seemingly first-order and Tarski knew that Gödel had shown first-order proof methods to be complete, and because ∀nP(n) is not a logical consequence of P(0), P(1), . . ., P(n), . . . by Taski's proposed definition. An attempt to resolve (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. John Etchemendy (1988). Tarski on Truth and Logical Consequence. Journal of Symbolic Logic 53 (1):51-79.
  42. A. B. Feferman, S. Feferman & Roger D. Maddux (2005). REVIEWS-Alfred Tarski, Life and Logic. Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 11 (4):535-540.
    Remove from this list |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Solomon Feferman, Tarski's Influence on Computer Science.
    The following is the text of an invited lecture for the LICS 2005 meeting held in Chicago June 26-29, 2005.1 Except for the addition of references, footnotes, corrections of a few points and stylistic changes, the text is essentially as delivered. Subsequent to the lecture I received interesting comments from several colleagues that would have led me to expand on some of the topics as well as the list of references, had I had the time to do so.
    Remove from this list |
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Solomon Feferman (2008). Tarski's Conceptual Analysis of Semantical Notions. In Douglas Patterson (ed.), New Essays on Tarski and Philosophy. Oxford University Press. 72.
    Remove from this list | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Solomon Feferman (2004). Tarski's Conception of Logic. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 126 (1-3):5-13.
    Tarski's general conception of logic placed it at the center of all rational thought, and he took its aim to be the creation of a unified conceptual apparatus. In pursuit of this conviction, from his base at the University of California in Berkeley in the post-war years he campaigned vigorously on behalf of logic, locally, nationally and internationally. Though Tarski was ecumenical in his efforts to establish the importance of logic in these various ways, in his own work—even that part (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Hartry Field (1972). Tarski's Theory of Truth. Journal of Philosophy 64 (13):347-375.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Juliet Floyd (2001). Prose Versus Proof: Wittgenstein on Gödel, Tarski and Truth. Philosophia Mathematica 9 (3):280-307.
    A survey of current evidence available concerning Wittgenstein's attitude toward, and knowledge of, Gödel's first incompleteness theorem, including his discussions with Turing, Watson and others in 1937–1939, and later testimony of Goodstein and Kreisel; 2) Discussion of the philosophical and historical importance of Wittgenstein's attitude toward Gödel's and other theorems in mathematical logic, contrasting this attitude with that of, e.g., Penrose; 3) Replies to an instructive criticism of my 1995 paper by Mark Steiner which assesses the importance of Tarski's semantical (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Chris Foster (2000). On Tarski's Theory of Logical Consequence. Southwest Philosophy Review 16 (1):125-132.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. John F. Fox (1989). What Were Tarski's Truth-Definitions For? History and Philosophy of Logic 10 (2):165-179.
    Tarski's manner of defining truth is generally considered highly significant. About why, there is less consensus. I argue first, that in his truth-definitions Tarski was trying to solve a set of philosophical problems; second, that he solved them successfully; third, that all of these that are simply problems about defining truth are as well or better solved by a simpler account of truth. But one of his crucial problems remains: to give an account of validity, one requires an account not (...)
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Harvey Friedman, Interpretations, According to Tarski.
    The notion of interpretation is absolutely fundamental to mathematical logic and the foundations of mathematics. It is also crucial for the foundations and philosophy of science - although here some crucial conditions generally need to be imposed; e.g., “the interpretation leaves the mathematical concepts unchanged”.
    Remove from this list | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 222