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  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (ed.) (1991). Philosophy, Social Theory, and the Thought of George Herbert Mead. SUNY Press.
    This book brings together some of the finest recent critical and expository work on Mead, written by American and European thinkers from diverse traditions. For English-speaking audiences it provides an introduction to recent European work on Mead. The essays reveal the richness of Mead’s thought, and will stimulate those who have thought about him from very specific vantage points to consider him in new ways.
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  2. Mitchell Aboulafia, Myra Orbach Bookman & Cathy Kemp (eds.) (2002). Habermas and Pragmatism. Routledge.
    Jürgen Habermas is one of the most important thinkers of this century. His work has been highly influential not only in philosophy, but particularly in the fields of politics, sociology and law. This is the first collection that explores the connections between his body of work and North America's biggest philosophical movement, pragmatism. Habermas and Pragmatism investigates the influences of pragmatism on Habermas' thought in a collection of stellar essays with contributions by Habermas himself, leading representatives of pragmatism, as well (...)
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  3. Jane Addams (1898). Ethical Survivals in Municipal Corruption. International Journal of Ethics 8 (3):273-291.
  4. Scott F. Aikin (2006). Pragmatism, Naturalism, and Phenomenology. Human Studies 29 (3):317 - 340.
    Pragmatism’s naturalism is inconsistent with the phenomenological tradition’s anti-naturalism. This poses a problem for the methodological consistency of phenomenological work in the pragmatist tradition. Solutions such as phenomenologizing naturalism or naturalizing phenomenology have been proposed, but they fail. As a consequence, pragmatists and other naturalists must answer the phenomenological tradition’s criticisms of naturalism.
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  5. Thomas Alexander (2003). Thinking in Place: Comments on Scott Pratt's Native Pragmatism. Philosophy and Geography 6 (2):225 – 236.
  6. Robert Almeder (2007). Pragmatism and Philosophy of Science: A Critical Survey. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 21 (2):171 – 195.
    After delineating the distinguishing features of pragmatism, and noting the resources that pragmatists have available to respond effectively as pragmatists to the two major objections to pragmatism, I examine and critically evaluate the various proposals that pragmatists have offered as a solution to the problem of induction, followed by a discussion of the pragmatic positions on the status of theoretical entities. Thereafter I discuss the pragmatic posture toward the nature of explanation in science. I conclude that pragmatism has (a) a (...)
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  7. John D. Arras (2001). Freestanding Pragmatism in Law and Bioethics. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (2):69-85.
    This paper represents the first installment of alarger project devoted to the relevance of pragmatism forbioethics. One self-consciously pragmatist move would be toreturn to the classical pragmatist canon of Peirce, James andDewey in search of substantive doctrines or methodologicalapproaches that might be applied to current bioethicalcontroversies. Another pragmatist (or neopragmatist) move wouldbe to subject the regnant principlist paradigm to Richard Rorty'ssubversive assaults on foundationalism in epistemology andethics. A third pragmatist method, dubbed ``freestandingpragmatism'' by its proponents, embraces a ``pragmatist'' approachto practical (...)
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  8. Guy Axtell, Means-End Reciprocity and the Aims of Education Debate.
    In the centennial year of John Dewey’s classic, Democracy and Education (1916), this paper revisits his thesis of the reciprocity of means and ends, arguing that it remains of central importance for debate over the aims of education. The paper provides a Dewey-inspired rebuttal of arguments for an ‘ultimate aim,’ but balances this with a development of the strong overlaps between proponents of pragmatism, intellectual virtues education (Jason Baehr) and critical thinking education (Harvey Siegel). Siegel’s ‘Kantian’ justification of critical thinking (...)
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  9. Brandon Beasley (2015). Expressivism, Pragmatism and Representationalism. [REVIEW] Dialogue 54 (3):573-576.
  10. Dave Beisecker (2012). Normative Functionalism and its Pragmatist Roots. Normative Funcitonalism and the Pittsburgh School.
    I shall characterize normative functionalism and contrast it with its causal counterpart. After tracing both stripes of functionalism to the work of the classical American pragmatists, I then argue that they are not exclusive alternatives. Instead, both might be required for an appropriately illuminating account of human rational activity.
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  11. Martin Benjamin (1973). Pacifism for Pragmatists. Ethics 83 (3):196-213.
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  12. Richard J. Bernstein (1995). American Pragmatism. In Herman J. Saatkamp (ed.), Rorty & Pragmatism: The Philosopher Responds to His Critics. Vanderbilt University Press 54--55.
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  13. Robert Brandom (2011). Perspectives on Pragmatism: Classical, Recent, and Contemporary. Harvard University Press.
    Classical American pragmatism: the pragmatist -- Enlightenment-and its problematic semantics -- Analyzing pragmatism: pragmatics and pragmatisms -- A Kantian rationalist pragmatism: pragmatism -- Inferentialism, and modality in Sellars's arguments against -- Empiricism -- Linguistic pragmatism and pragmatism about norms: an arc of -- Thought from Rorty's eliminative materialism to his pragmatism -- Vocabularies of pragmatism: synthesizing naturalism and -- Historicism -- Towards an analytic pragmatism: meaning-use analysis -- Pragmatism, expressivism, and anti-representationalism: -- Local and global possibilities.
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  14. F. Thomas Burke (2014). Extended Mind and Representation. In John R. Shook & Tibor Solymosi (eds.), Pragmatist Neurophilosophy: American Philosophy and the Brain. Bloomsbury Academic 177-202.
    Good old-fashioned cognitive science characterizes human thinking as symbol manipulation qua computation and therefore emphasizes the processing of symbolic representations as a necessary if not sufficient condition for “general intelligent action.” Recent alternative conceptions of human thinking tend to deemphasize if not altogether eschew the notion of representation. The present paper shows how classical American pragmatist conceptions of human thinking can successfully avoid either of these extremes, replacing old-fashioned conceptions of representation with one that characterizes both representatum and representans in (...)
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  15. F. Thomas Burke (2014). Truth, Justice, and the American Pragmatist Way. In Graham Hubbs & Douglas Lind (eds.), Pragmatism, Law, and Language. Routledge 191-204.
    Throughout his many writings Charles Sanders Peirce occasionally presented examples of how to use the pragmatist method of defining one’s terms, having insisted that pragmatism is just that: a methodological stance concerning how best to clarify one’s terminology. One of the more remarkable examples is his definition of the word ‘reality’ with the corollary definition of the word ‘truth’. It is argued here that this definition also supplies for free a corollary definition of the word ‘knowledge’. Moreover, the same type (...)
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  16. Sharyn Clough (2010). Drawing Battle Lines and Choosing Bedfellows : Rorty, Relativism, and Feminist Strategy. In Marianne Janack (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Richard Rorty. Pennsylvania State University Press
  17. Allegra de Laurentiis (2007). Not Hegel’s Tales: Applied Concepts, Negotiated Truths and the Reciprocity of Un-Equals in Conceptual Pragmatism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 33 (1):83-98.
    The article expresses skepticism on the alleged affinity between Hegel’s theory of conceptuality and conceptual pragmatism. Despite the intriguing philosophical impetus underlying the latter, the author formulates doubts about its compatibility with logical and metaphysical principles of absolute idealism. The criticism is articulated in four theses: pragmatism’s concerns with concept-acquisition and concept-application are largely alien to Hegel’s logical-metaphysical theory of conceptuality; the interchangeability of ‘word’ and ‘concept’ in the pragmatist discussion is incompatible with Hegel’s notion of thinking; the distinction of (...)
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  18. Herman de Regt, Title: Pragmatism: Living Versus Paper Doubt.
    [H. de Regt is ‘co-supervisor’ of the current UvT PhD project ‘Consciousness: Science Says It All?’ (drs. A. Frantzen; supervisor: prof. em. dr. A. A. Derksen). This project (in which the problem of phenomenal consciousness is approached via the work of the American pragmatist John Dewey) is absorbed in the programme Pragmatism: Living versus Paper Doubt. In order to realize the project described below he has provisionally planned (a) further collaboration with prof. dr. C.J.M. Schuyt (University of Amsterdam) to realize (...)
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  19. Jeremy Dunham (2014). Was James Ward a Cambridge Pragmatist? British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (3):557-581.
    Although the Cambridge Professor of Mental Philosophy and Logic James Ward was once one of Britain's most highly regarded Psychologists and Philosophers, today his work is unjustly neglected. This is because his philosophy is frequently misrepresented as a reactionary anti-naturalistic idealist theism. In this article, I argue, first, that this reading is false, and that by viewing Ward through the lens of pragmatism we obtain a fresh interpretation of his work that highlights the scientific nature of his philosophy and his (...)
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  20. S. Fesmire (1998). James Gouinlock, Rediscovering the Moral Life: Philosophy and Human Practice. Journal of Value Inquiry 32:133-137.
  21. Steven Fesmire (2016). USEFUL FOR WHAT? DEWEY's CALL TO HUMANIZE TECHNO-INDUSTRIAL CIVILIZATION. Pragmatism Today 7 (1):11-19.
    The heart of Dewey’s call to humanize technoindustrial civilization was to conceive science and technology in the service of aesthetic consummations. Hence his philosophy suggests a way to reclaim and affirm technology on behalf of living more fulfilling lives. He remains a powerful ally today in the fight against deadening efficiency, narrow means-end calculation, “frantic exploitation,” and the industrialization of everything. Nonetheless, it is common to depict him as a philosopher we should think around rather than with. The first section (...)
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  22. Steven Fesmire (2005). Cultivating EcologicaI Imagination. Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 9 (2):339-352.
  23. Steven A. Fesmire (1995). Educating the Moral Artist: Dramatic Rehearsal in Moral Education. Studies in Philosophy and Education 13 (3-4):213-227.
    Recent sociological studies, like Robert Bellah’s Habits of the Heart, support the claim that Americans retain an ideal of isolated self-sufficiency. Yet the material conditions of our culture require ideals that shun exclusiveness and encourage associated living. The result of this dissonance is that Americans tend to approach their own and others’ values in a way that boils down to irrational personal preference. …Such is the cultural predicament that a theory of moral education must ultimately confront. In this essay I (...)
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  24. Arthur Fine (2007). Relativism, Pragmatism, and the Practice of Science. In Cheryl J. Misak (ed.), New Pragmatists. Oxford University Press 50--67.
    "But science in the making, science as an end to be pursued, is as subjective and psychologically conditioned as any other branch of human endeavor-- so much so that the question, What is the purpose and meaning of science? receives quite different answers at different times and from different sorts of people" (Einstein 1934, p. 112).
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  25. Mathew A. Foust (2015). Confucianism and American Pragmatism. Philosophy Compass 10 (6):369-378.
    One area of the East–West comparative philosophy that has received a good deal of attention in recent years is the relationship between Confucianism and American Pragmatism. Scholars engaging these traditions have argued that they are mutually elucidating and mutually reinforcing. Often, upon locating resonance between a Confucian philosopher and an American Pragmatist philosopher, scholars combine the conceptual resources of the two, developing a Confucian–Pragmatist hybrid concept or theory. Some critics have been skeptical of the alleged compatibility between Confucian and American (...)
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  26. Randy L. Friedman (2011). Dewey's Naturalistic Metaphysics: Expostulations and Replies. Education and Culture 27 (2):48-73.
    Critics of Dewey’s metaphysics point to his dismissal of any philosophy which locates ideals in a realm beyond experience. However, Dewey’s sustained critique of dualistic philosophies is but a first step in his reconstruction and recovery of the function of the metaphysical. Detaching the discussion of values from inquiry, whether scientific, philosophical or educational, produces the same end as relegating values to a transcendent realm that is beyond ordinary human discourse. Dewey’s naturalistic metaphysics supports his progressive educational philosophy. The duty (...)
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  27. Maughn Gregory (2001). The Status of Rational Norms:: A Pragmatist Perspective. Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 21 (1):53-64.
    Cultural conservatives urge curricula for critical thinking and character education as means of shoring up rational and moral truths. Cultural critics challenge not only the objectivity of the standard curricula but the very norms of objectivity used to justify it. A pragmatist account of rational and other norms leaves most of those norms intact but makes their status provisional.
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  28. Serge Grigoriev (2014). Normativity and Reality in Peirce's Thought. European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 6 (1):88-106.
    The purpose of the essay is to explore some points pertaining to Peirce’s conception of reality, with a special emphasis on the themes developed in his later writings (such as normativity, common sense, and the logic of signs). The resulting proposal advances a preliminary reading of some key issues (arising in connection with Peirce’s discussions of reality and truth), configured with a view to the socially sustainable, coordinated practices of inquiry that are intrinsically embedded in the biological and cultural dynamics (...)
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  29. Serge Grigoriev (2014). PHILOSOPHY IN TRANSITION: JOHN DEWEY's “LOST” MANUSCRIPT. History and Theory 53 (3):372-386.
    The intention of this essay is to offer a reading of John Dewey’s recently found manuscript (considered lost for decades), Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy, as a kind of philosophical history leading up to the formulation of the key problems to be addressed by the general framework of Dewey’s cultural naturalism. I argue, first, that cultural naturalism has direct implications for the way that we think about history, and that Dewey’s recently recovered manuscript reflects this in its conception of the (...)
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  30. Morris Grossman (1993). A Brief and Tentative Sketch of the Founding and Early History of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 21 (65):14-21.
  31. Susan Haack (2005). On Legal Pragmatism: Where Does 'the Path of the Law' Lead Us? American Journal of Jurisprudence 50 (1):71-105.
    What is called legal pragmatism today is very different from the older style of legal pragmatism traditionally associated with Oliver Wendell Holmes; and there is much that is worthwhile on the conception of the law revealed by reading Holmes's The Path of the Law in the light of the classical pragmatist tradition of Peirce, James, and Dewey. Here, reflections on the varieties of pragmatism - philosophical and legal, old and new - will be wrapped around an exploration of Holmes's legal (...)
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  32. M. Gail Hamner (2003). American Pragmatism: A Religious Genealogy. Oxford University Press.
    Hamner seeks to discover what makes pragmatism uniquely American. She argues that the inextricably American character of pragmatism of such figures as C.S. Peirce and William James lies in its often understated affirmation of America as a uniquely religious country with a God-given mission and populated by God-fearing citizens.
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  33. Gary Hatfield (2003). Behaviourism and Psychology. In Thomas Baldwin (ed.), Cambridge History of Philosophy, 1870–1945. Cambridge University Press 640-48.
    Behaviorism was a peculiarly American phenomenon. As a school of psychology it was founded by John B. Watson (1878-1958) and grew into the neobehaviorisms of the 1920s, 30s and 40s. Philosophers were involved from the start, prefiguring the movement and endeavoring to define or redefine its tenets. Behaviorism expressed the naturalistic bent in American thought, which came in response to the prevailing philosophical idealism and was inspired by developments in natural science itself. There were several versions of naturalism in American (...)
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  34. Lisa Heldke (2015). Pragmatist Philosophical Reflections on GMOs. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 28 (5):817-836.
    This essay examines the public debate about the agricultural biotechnologies known as genetically modified organisms, as that debate is being carried out in its most dichotomizing forms in the United States. It attempts to reveal the power of sharply dichotomous thinking, as well as its limits. The essay draws on the work of Michel Serres, who uses the concept of the parasite to reconstruct or reframe fundamental dichotomies in western philosophy; it attempts a similar reframing of the public debates about (...)
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  35. Lisa Heldke (2012). An Alternative Ontology of Food. Radical Philosophy Review 15 (1):67-88.
    This essay explores some well-traveled territory—the area in which eating and suffering come together. I undertake two projects. First, I scrutinize some foods that are often portrayed as unambiguously either good or bad , in an effort to complicate the stories we tell about them. What violence has been heretofore invisible in them? What compassion has been occluded? This project informs a second: an answer to the question “how should we eat?” My answer takes up Kelly Oliver’s call for an (...)
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  36. Lisa Heldke (2003). Exotic Appetites: Ruminations of a Food Adventurer. Routledge.
    First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  37. D. Micah Hester (2003). Is Pragmatism Well-Suited to Bioethics? Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 28 (5 & 6):545 – 561.
    This paper attempts to defend pragmatic approaches to bioethics against detractors, showing how particular critics have failed or succeeded. The paper divides bioethics from a pragmatic point of view into three groups. The first group is called "bioethical pragmatism" that will be represented by two book-chapters from the anthology, Pragmatic Bioethics . The second group is called "clinical pragmatism" championed by Fins, Baccetta, and Miller. Finally, a third group, which has roots in the legal tradition, has been called "freestanding pragmatism" (...)
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  38. Larry A. Hickman (2004). Pragmatism, Postmodernism, and Global Citizenship. Metaphilosophy 35 (1‐2):65-81.
    : The founders of American pragmatism proposed what they regarded as a radical alternative to the philosophical methods and doctrines of their predecessors and contemporaries. Although their central ideas have been understood and applied in some quarters, there remain other areas within which they have been neither appreciated nor appropriated. One of the more pressing of these areas locates a set of problems of knowledge and valuation related to global citizenship. This essay attempts to demonstrate that classical American pragmatism, because (...)
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  39. Woody Holton (2003). Starting with the Indians: A Response to Scott Pratt's Native Pragmatism. Philosophy and Geography 6 (2):237 – 245.
  40. Andrew Howat (2010). Review: Some Pragmatist Themes. [REVIEW] Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (1):143-149.
    David S. Clarke is clearly passionate about pragmatism. In this short, compelling book he explores what he calls "two fundamental claims" of pragmatism. He does this, he explains, with the "conviction that if pragmatism is to continue as a viable force in contemporary philosophy it must incorporate advances in philosophical method introduced by the linguistic philosophers of the past century" (xi). The two fundamental claims that interest Clarke are as follows: that cognitive inquiry and belief are to be understood in (...)
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  41. Andrew Howat (2005). Pragmatism, Truth and Response-Dependence. Facta Philosophica 7 (2):231-253.
    Mark Johnston claims the pragmatist theory of truth is inconsistent with the way we actually employ and talk about that concept. He is, however, sympathetic enough to attempt to rescue its respectable core using ‘response-dependence’, a revisionary form of which he advocates as a method for clarifying various philosophically significant concepts. But Johnston has misrepresented pragmatism; it does not require rescuing, and as I show here, his ‘missing explanation argument’ against pragmatism therefore fails. What Johnston and other critics including Putnam (...)
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  42. William James (1978). Pragmatism, a New Name for Some Old Ways of Thinking ; the Meaning of Truth, a Sequel to Pragmatism. Harvard University Press.
  43. William James (1967). The Writings of William James. New York, Modern Library.
  44. William James (1906). Mr. Pitkin's Refutation of `Radical Empiricism'. Journal of Philosophy, Psychology and Scientific Methods 3 (26):712.
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  45. Eric Katz & Andrew Light (eds.) (1996). Environmental Pragmatism. Routledge.
    Environmental pragmatism is a new strategy in environmental thought. It argues that theoretical debates are hindering the ability of the environmental movement to forge agreement on basic policy imperatives. This new direction in environmental thought moves beyond theory, advocating a serious inquiry into the merits of moral pluralism. Environmental pragmatism, as a coherent philosophical position, connects the methodology of classical American pragmatic thought to the explanation, solution and discussion of real issues. This concise, well-focused collection is the first comprehensive presentation (...)
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  46. Osmo Kivinen & Tero Piiroinen (2006). Toward Pragmatist Methodological Relationalism: From Philosophizing Sociology to Sociologizing Philosophy. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (3):303-329.
    University of Turku, Finland In this article, relationalist approaches to social sciences are analyzed in terms of a conceptual distinction between "philosophizing sociology" and "sociologizing philosophy." These mark two different attitudes toward philosophical metaphysics and ontological commitments. The authors’ own pragmatist methodological relationalism of Deweyan origin is compared with ontologically committed realist approaches, as well as with Bourdieuan methodological relationalism. It is argued that pragmatist philosophy of social sciences is an appropriate tool for assisting social scientists in their methodological work, (...)
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  47. Colin Koopman, Genealogical Pragmatism: Problematization and Reconstruction.
    I argue for a new broad-based form of critical inquiry which I refer to as genealogical pragmatism. This conception of critical inquiry combines the genealogical emphasis on problematization featured in Michel Foucault's work with the pragmatist emphasis on reconstruction featured in John Dewey's work. Rather than being understood as two opposed forms of critique and inquiry, as is commonly supposed, I demonstrate that problematization and reconstruction fit together quite well. The work of problematization invites the response of reconstruction just as (...)
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  48. Colin Koopman (2012). Pragmatist Resources for Experimental Philosophy: Inquiry in Place of Intuition. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 26 (1):1-24.
    Recent attention given to the upstart movement of experimental philosophy is much deserved. But now that experimental philosophy is beginning to enter a stage of maturity, it is time to consider its relation to other philosophical traditions that have issued similar assaults against ingrained and potentially misguided philosophical habits. Experimental philosophy is widely known for rejecting a philosophical reliance on intuitions as evidence in philosophical argument. In this it shares much with another branch of empiricist philosophy, namely, pragmatism. Taking Kwame (...)
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  49. Colin Koopman (2007). Language is a Form of Experience: Reconciling Classical Pragmatism and Neopragmatism. Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 43 (4):694 - 727.
    : The revival of philosophical pragmatism has generated a wealth of intramural debates between neopragmatists like Richard Rorty and contemporary scholars devoted to explicating the classical pragmatism of John Dewey and William James. Of all these internecine conflicts, the most divisive concerns the status of language and experience in pragmatist philosophy. Contemporary scholars of classical pragmatism defend experience as the heart of pragmatism while neopragmatists drop the concept of experience in favor of a thoroughly linguistic pragmatism. I argue that both (...)
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  50. Joel Krueger (2007). William James and Kitaro Nishida on “Pure Experience”, Consciousness, and Moral Psychology. Dissertation, Purdue University
    The question “What is the nature of experience?” is of perennial philosophical concern. It deals not only with the nature of experience qua experience, but additionally with related questions about the experiencing subject and that which is experienced. In other words, to speak of the philosophical problem of experience, one must also address questions about mind, world, and the various relations that link them together. Both William James and Kitarō Nishida were deeply concerned with these issues. Their shared notion of (...)
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