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  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (2013). Voices and Selves: Beyond the Modern-Postmodern Divide. The Pluralist 8 (1):1-12.
    Arthur O. Lovejoy famously referred to thirteen pragmatisms. If he were called on to enumerate postmodernisms, no doubt he would increase this number tenfold.1 Fortunately I need not follow his lead for the task at hand, namely, to discuss whether the pragmatic tradition can narrow the divide between modernism and postmodernism on the topic of cosmopolitanism. To do so I will focus on specific sets of ideas that have been associated with these terms. So, for example, modernists have been viewed (...)
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  2. Mitchell Aboulafia (2011). Through the Eyes of Mad Men: Simulation, Interaction, and Ethics. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PRAGMATISM AND AMERICAN PHILOSOPHY (2):133-147.
    Traditionally pragmatists have been favorably disposed to improving our understanding of agency and ethics through the use of empirical research. In the last two decades simulation theory has been championed in certain cognitive science circles as a way of explaining how we attribute mental states and predict human behavior. Drawing on research in psychology and neuroscience, Alvin I. Goldman and Robert M. Gordon have not only used simulation theory to discuss how we “mindread”, but have suggested that the theory has (...)
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  3. Mitchell Aboulafia, Victor Kestenbaum, Jason Jordan, Jacoby Adeshei Carter, Sarah Louise Scott, Richard Kenneth Atkins, Christa Hodapp, John Kaag, Shane Ralston & Kipton E. Jensen (2013). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). The Pluralist 8 (1).
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  4. E. M. Adams (2007). On Being a Human Being. The Pluralist 2 (1):1 - 15.
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  5. David W. Agler (2011). Beyond Moral Judgment (Review). The Pluralist 6 (2):103-110.
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  6. David W. Agler (2011). Beyond Moral Judgment, Alice Crary Beyond Moral Judgment Crary Alice Harvard UP , Cambridge. The Pluralist 6 (2):103-110.
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  7. Hartley Burr Alexander (2008). Living Mind: An Inquiry Into the Psychological and Logical Foundation of Human Understanding. The Pluralist 3 (1):11 - 88.
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  8. Thomas M. Alexander (2014). Review Susanne Langer in Focus: The Symbolic Mind Innis Robert E. Indiana UP Bloomington. The Pluralist 9 (1):108-114.
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  9. Thomas M. Alexander (2014). Susanne Langer in Focus: The Symbolic Mind by Robert E. Innis (Review). The Pluralist 9 (1):108-114.
    Robert Innis has performed an immensely valuable service for scholars in the fields of American philosophy, aesthetics, and semiotics. Not only does his comprehensive view of Susanne K. Langer’s opus show us its development, but this is the only book in English devoted solely to Langer. I hope it may help retrieve her considerable philosophical achievement from the penumbral, fading status it has today. Not only does Innis give us a close discussion of Langer’s philosophy, but he also presents a (...)
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  10. Thomas M. Alexander (2011). Dewey: A Beginner's Guide. The Pluralist 6 (2):54-56.
    Simply put, this book is the best short introduction to John Dewey’s philosophy.1 It is lucidly written and is sensitively accurate in things both great and small. It is concise yet broadly informed. It is balanced without straining to say everything, focused without being compressed. It directs the reader to Dewey’s key writings and indicates reliable commentary. It concludes by indicating Dewey’s relevance for contemporary issues: medical ethics, environmentalism, feminism. Nevertheless, that the book appears in a series called “Beginner’s Guides” (...)
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  11. Thomas M. Alexander (2011). Discussion: David Hildebrand's Dewey: A Beginner's Guide Dewey: A Beginner's Guide Hildebrand David Oneworld , Oxford, Eng. The Pluralist 6 (2):54-56.
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  12. Thomas M. Alexander (2010). Eros and Spirit: Toward a Humanistic Philosophy of Culture. The Pluralist 5 (2):18-44.
    "Philosophy and Civilization" is one of Dewey's most important—and most neglected—essays. It is unsettling to anyone who wants to think of Dewey primarily as a "pragmatist." Dewey says the aim of philosophy should be to deal with the meaning of culture and not "inquiry" or "truth": "Meaning is wider in scope as well as more precious in value than is truth and philosophy is occupied with meaning rather than with truth" (LW 3:4).1 Truths are one kind of meaning, but they (...)
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  13. Thomas M. Alexander (2008). Hartley Burr Alexander: Humanistic Personalism and Pluralism. The Pluralist 3 (1):89 - 127.
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  14. Thomas M. Alexander (2008). The Life and Work of Hartley Burr Alexander. The Pluralist 3 (1):1 - 10.
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  15. Thomas M. Alexander, Robert Cummings Neville, Raymond D. Boisvert, Martin Coleman, Jacquelyn Anne K. Kegley & Kelly Dean Jolley (2010). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Ii). The Pluralist 5 (2).
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  16. James W. Allard (2011). Bugbee on the Ground of Unconditional Affirmation. The Pluralist 6 (2):35-53.
    In his foreword to wilderness and the heart, a collection of essays on Henry Bugbee’s philosophy, Alasdair MacIntyre commends Bugbee’s book, The Inward Morning, for the way in which it integrates form and content. How it is written and what it says, MacIntyre writes, “are to be grasped together or not at all” (xiii). “What can be learned from The Inward Morning,” MacIntyre continues, “is not primarily a set of philosophical theses and arguments—although such theses and arguments are to be (...)
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  17. Richard T. Allen (2009). The Unity of the Person. The Pluralist 4 (1):77 - 84.
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  18. Douglas Anderson (2011). The Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition: 1890–1892, Vol. 8, Ed. Nathan Houser Et Al. The Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition: 1890–1892 Houser Nathan Indiana UP , Bloomington. [REVIEW] The Pluralist 6 (2):61-64.
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  19. Douglas Anderson (2011). The Writings of Charles S. Peirce: A Chronological Edition: 1890–1892, Vol. Nathan Houser Et Al. The Pluralist 6 (2):61-64.
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  20. Douglas R. Anderson (2014). Roads to Divinity. The Pluralist 9 (1):87-96.
    Not long before he died, Henry David Thoreau was asked by a friend where religion was to be found in his writings. Thoreau responded by saying that his religiosity pervaded his works but that no one noticed it. This result was enabled by the cultural belief that religiosity entailed formal religion, creeds, fixed rituals, and overt discussions of God or gods. Thoreau’s point—a development of Emerson’s “Divinity School Address”—was to show the mistakenness of this compartmentalization of one’s religious life. For (...)
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  21. Douglas R. Anderson (1989). Cosmic Religion. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 17 (53):8-9.
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  22. István Aranyosi (2012). Quantifier Versus Poetry. Stylistic Impoverishment and Socio-Cultural Estrangement of Anglo-American Philosophy in the Last Hundred Years. The Pluralist 7 (1):94-103.
    Recent discussion, both in the academia-related popular media and in some professional academic venues, about the current state and role of mainstream Anglo-American analytic philosophy among the humanities, has revealed a certain uneasiness expressed by both champions of this approach and traditional adversaries of it regarding its perceived isolation from the other fields of humanities. The fiercer critics go as far as to claim that the image of this type of philosophizing in the contemporary world is one of a discipline (...)
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  23. J. Heath Atchley (2011). Attention, Affirmation, and the Spiritual Law of Gravity. The Pluralist 5 (3):63-72.
    All of us had fallen from 100 stories.Falling is rarely a good thing. It is something to avoid for safety, and such avoidance, for those of us fortunate enough to be in good health, has been burned into the unconscious memory of our muscles and bones. Unless we find ourselves in high places (pursuing intense pleasure, such as rock climbing, or performing work that few will do, such as painting a steeple), or on some kind of precipice (the edge of (...)
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  24. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2013). Broadening Peirce's Phaneroscopy: Part Two. The Pluralist 8 (1):97-114.
    In the first part of this essay (The Pluralist 7.2, Summer 2012, pp. 1-29), I argued against the Narrow Conception of phaneroscopy by showing that it is not to be found in Peirce's writings and that several passages in Peirce's writings indicate the Narrow Conception is false. As a consequence, we must broaden our understanding of phaneroscopy's aim. In this part, I shall argue that we should broaden our understanding of phaneroscopy's method, that is, our understanding of phaneroscopic observation, description, (...)
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  25. Richard Kenneth Atkins (2012). Broadening Peirce's Phaneroscopy: Part One. The Pluralist 7 (2):1-29.
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  26. Richard Kenneth Atkins, Adam Glover, Katie Terezakis, Whitley Kaufman, Steven Levine, Seth Vannatta, Aaron Massecar, Robert Main & Jerome A. Stone (2012). Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iv). The Pluralist 7 (2).
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  27. Randall E. Auxier (forthcoming). Introduction to Focus on Jan Olof Bengtsson's The Worldview of Personalism. The Pluralist.
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  28. Randall E. Auxier (2012). Editorial Statement. The Pluralist 7 (1):1-5.
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  29. Randall E. Auxier (2010). Editorial Statement. The Pluralist 5 (1):1-5.
    Beginning with the present number of The Pluralist, we commence an association with the well known and widely respected Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy, founded in 1972. It is a pleasant circumstance that we can combine our twenty-five-year history of service to pluralistic and personalist philosophies with the admirable mission of the SAAP, which has always stood for openness and responsible philosophical growth with an eye to the lessons of the past and an orientation to a more ideal (...)
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  30. Randall E. Auxier (2009). An Editorial Statement. The Pluralist 4 (1):v-vi.
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  31. Randall E. Auxier (2008). A Plurality of Persons in Relation: Bengtsson on Pluralism. The Pluralist 3 (2):113 - 127.
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  32. Randall E. Auxier (2007). Royce's "Conservatism". The Pluralist 2 (2):44 - 55.
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  33. Randall E. Auxier (2006). The Possibilities of Pluralism. The Pluralist 1 (1):1 - 12.
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  34. Randall E. Auxier, Shane J. Ralston, Randy L. Friedman, Michael Futch, Tadd Ruetenik, István Aranyosi & Marilyn Fischer (2012). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). The Pluralist 7 (1).
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  35. Gary Backhaus (2006). Ellis's Existential Ontology of Eros. The Pluralist 1 (3):106 - 116.
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  36. Lewis V. Baldwin (2011). The Unfolding of the Moral Order: Rufus Burrow, Jr., Personal Idealism, and the Life and Thought of Martin Luther King, Jr. The Pluralist 6 (1):1-13.
    Much attention has been devoted in recent years to the personal idealism of Martin Luther King, Jr. Among the major contributors to the scholarship in this area is Rufus Burrow, Jr., who places King firmly in the tradition of personal idealism, or personalism, while also uncovering the intellectual unease that made King both a deep and creative thinker and a committed and effective social activist.1 Clearly, Burrow's own sense of his role as a personalist informs his approach to the life (...)
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  37. Lewis V. Baldwin, Dwayne A. Tunstall & Rufus Burrow Jr (2011). 1. Front Matter Front Matter (Pp. I-Iii). The Pluralist 6 (1).
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  38. Amrita Banerjee (2012). Josiah Royce in Focus (Review). The Pluralist 7 (2):109-112.
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  39. Amrita Banerjee (2012). Review Josiah Royce in Focus Kegley Jacquelyn Ann K. Indiana UP Bloomington. The Pluralist 7 (2):109-112.
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  40. Amrita Banerjee (2011). Reorienting the Ethics of Transnational Surrogacy as a Feminist Pragmatist. The Pluralist 5 (3):107-127.
    The issue of surrogacy has received a great deal of attention in the West ever since the famous Baby M case in the latter part of the 1980s. Ethicists, psychologists, and legal experts have struggled with the meanings and implications of this practice, especially in its commercial form. In contemporary times, however, the phenomenon of surrogacy has assumed new dimensions as it travels across national borders in the context of globalization. As a transnational phenomenon, it is now marketed as an (...)
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  41. Celia Bardwell-Jones (2011). The Space Between: The Politics of Immigration in Asian/Pacific Islander America. The Pluralist 5 (3):49-55.
    I would like to thank Dr. Gabaccia for her intriguing essay on the origins of the term "nation of immigrants." It really has helped me think about immigration with more historical richness. In my own work, I examine what goes into transnational and diasporic identities. I understand transnational identities as those operating between the loyalties of two or more countries. Going against perhaps unidirectional ways of understanding the immigrant as a foreigner entering into a country, I understand the immigrant identity (...)
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  42. Y. Michael Barilan (2006). On the Negative Account of the Self. The Pluralist 1 (2):68 - 87.
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  43. Kara E. Barnette (2007). Communities, Traitors, and the Feminist Cause: Looking Toward Josiah Royce for Feminist Scholarship. The Pluralist 2 (2):81 - 90.
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  44. Joe Barnhart (2006). Brightman and Popper on the Emergence of the Person: Implications for the Abortion Issue. The Pluralist 1 (2):57 - 67.
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  45. John Barresi (2006). On Earth As It Is in Heaven: Trinitarian Influences on Locke's Account of Personal Identity. The Pluralist 1 (1):110 - 128.
    Locke’s concepts of person and self as they first appeared in the 1694 essay were not original to him but had already appeared in the Trinitarian controversy in England in the early 1690s. In particular, William Sherlock, who in 1690 argued that the Trinity might be understood as composed of three distinct self-conscious minds or persons in one God, previously used not only concepts but also phrases that Locke used in his definition of person. Both Sherlock and Locke defined person (...)
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  46. Thora Ilin Bayer (2008). The Philosophy of Symbolic Forms as a Philosophy of Pluralism. The Pluralist 3 (3):95 - 110.
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  47. Justin Bell (2013). Reconstructing Individualism: A Pragmatic Tradition From Emerson to Ellison by James M. Albrecht (Review). The Pluralist 8 (2):116-121.
    Pragmatism seeks to reconstruct the individual's understanding of herself so that she is better equipped to grow and seek integration in her community. Given radical changes through the modern age and into our contemporary time, the idea of individualism that informs modern philosophy is radically out of step with reality. Pragmatism holds that individuality develops in interaction with an environment and, therefore, there is no originary individual such as moderns like Locke posit that exists antecedent to social life. However, the (...)
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  48. Justin Bell (2013). Review Reconstructing Individualism: A Pragmatic Tradition From Emerson to Ellison Albrecht James M. Fordham UP New York. The Pluralist 8 (2):116-121.
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  49. Jan Olof Bengtsson (2011). A Second Reply to Phillip Ferreira. The Pluralist 6 (1):135-143.
    As a philosopher rather than a historian, Phillip Ferreira tends naturally, in his article in this issue of The Pluralist, "On the Imperviousness of Persons," as in his first one on The Worldview of Personalism, to place the emphasis quite as much on the general philosophical issues as on the specific historical interpretation of Pringle-Pattison. But this emphasis was from the beginning invited by my own assessment of Pringle-Pattison. I will continue here to answer Ferreira to a considerable extent in (...)
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  50. Joseph Betz (1989). The Concept of the Human Being in George Herbert Mead. Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 17 (52):9-9.
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