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  1. Ruhi Muhsen Afnán (1969). Zoroaster's Influence on Anaxagoras, the Greek Tragedians, and Socrates. New York, Philosophical Library.
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  2. D. J. Allan (1980). ΑΝΑΓΙΓΝΩΣΚΩ And Some Cognate Words. Classical Quarterly 30 (01):244-.
    Presumably it is common ground that this verb has in addition to the basic sense ‘recognize’ the derivative sense ‘oread’, and that one must judge from the context whether reading to one or more other people, or private reading, is meant. The reading of the text of a law to a jury at an orator's request is marked by the circumstances themselves as public reading; so is the reading of the Athenian decree to the Mitylenaeans in Thucydides. When Theaetetus answers (...)
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  3. D. J. Allan (1950). CLEVE, F. M. - The Philosophy of Anaxagoras - an Attempt at Reconstruction. [REVIEW] Mind 59:400.
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  4. Jochen Althoff (2012). Presocratic Discourse in Poetry and Prose: The Case of Empedocles and Anaxagoras. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (2):293-299.
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  5. David Anaxagoras & Sider (1981). The Fragments of Anaxagoras. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  6. Anaxagoras & Arthur Fairbanks (1898). Anaxagoras: Fragments and Commentary (The First Philosophers of Greece). K. Paul, Trench, Trubner.
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  7. Emil Arleth (1895). Die Lehre des Anaxagoras vom Geist und der Seele. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 8 (1):59-86.
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  8. Emil Arleth (1895). Zu Anaxagoras. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 8 (4):461-465.
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  9. Fernando Inciarte Armiñán (1994). Sobre la fugacidad: Anaxágoras y Aristóteles, Quevedo y Rilke. Anuario Filosófico 27 (2):365-378.
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  10. Elizabeth Asmis (1988). Anaxagoras's Theory of Matter. International Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):116-116.
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  11. D. Bargrave-Weaver (1959). The Cosmogony of Anaxagoras. Phronesis 4 (2):77-91.
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  12. Rachel Barney (2009). Simplicius: Commentary, Harmony, and Authority. Antiquorum Philosophia 3:101-120.
    Simplicius’ project of harmonizing previous philosophers deserves to be taken seriously as both a philosophical and an interpretive project. Simplicius follows Aristotle himself in developing charitable interpretations of his predecessors: his distinctive project, in the Neoplatonic context, is the rehabilitation of the Presocratics (especially Parmenides, Anaxagoras and Empedocles) from a Platonic-Aristotelian perspective. Simplicius’ harmonizations involve hermeneutic techniques which are recognisably those of the serious historian of philosophy; and harmonization itself has a distinguished history as a constructive philosophical method.
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  13. P. J. Bicknell (1967). Coins and the Presocratics I - Anaxagoras. Apeiron 1 (2):26 - 28.
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  14. Shannon Du Bose (1964). Anaxagoras' Theory of Mind. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 13:50-54.
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  15. Tad Brennan (forthcoming). The Text of Anaxagoras Fragment DK 59 B22. American Journal of Philology.
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  16. Walter Bröcker (1943). Die Lehre Des Anaxagoras. Kant-Studien 42 (1-2):176-189.
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  17. Robert D. Brown (1983). Lucretian Ridicule of Anaxagoras. Classical Quarterly 33 (01):146-.
    In the first argumentative section of Book 1, Lucretius establishes the existence of matter and void , and in the second identifies matter as the atoms and defines their properties . In the third section, following Epicurean tradition, he attempts to refute a representative selection of Presocratic philosophers – Heraclitus , Empedocles and Anaxagoras – whose explanations of basic matter are potential rivals to the atomist theory which he has just outlined. The climax to this section is reached in Lucretius' (...)
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  18. Robert S. Brumbaugh (1991). The Book of Anaxagoras. Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):149-150.
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  19. William M. Calder (1984). A Fragment of Anaxagoras in Thucydides? Classical Quarterly 34 (02):485-.
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  20. Gordon Campbell (2005). Empedocles Divided J. Bollack: Empédocle : Les purifications. Un projet de paix universelle . Édité, traduit et commenté. (Collection Points, Série Essais, 498.) Pp. 144. Paris: Éditions du Seuil, 2003. Paper. ISBN: 2-02-056915-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):12-.
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  21. Caponigri Caponigri (1949). LEVE'S The Philosophy of Anaxagoras. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 10:457.
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  22. Ava Chitwood (1986). The Death of Empedocles. American Journal of Philology 107 (2):175.
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  23. Gordon Haddon Clark (1929). Empedocles and Anaxagoras in Aristotle's De Anima. Philadelphia.
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  24. Felix M. Cleve (1973). The Philosophy of Anaxagoras. The Hague,Nijhoff.
    The truly great ones, the giants, the really original thinkers, the pure philosopher types, these are to be found in the time before Plato.
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  25. Felix M. Cleve (1970). Zoroaster's Influence on Anaxagoras, the Greek Tragedians, and Socrates. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 8 (4).
  26. F. M. Cornford (1930). Anaxagoras' Theory of Matter—I. Classical Quarterly 24 (01):14-30.
    Anaxagoras’ theory of matter offers a problem which, in bald outline, may be stated as follows. The theory rests on two propositions which seem flatly to contradict one another. One is the principle of Homoeomereity: A natural substance such as a piece of gold, consists solely of parts which are like the whole and like one another—every one of them gold and nothing else. The other is: ‘There is a portion of everything in everything’, understood to mean that a piece (...)
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  27. Dirk L. Couprie (2014). Science Before Socrates: Parmenides, Anaxagoras, and the New Astronomy by Daniel W. Graham (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (4):835-836.
    Within the timespan of two years, two books have been published on the Presocratics as scientists. In 2011 appeared Carlo Rovelli’s The First Scientist. Anaximander and His Legacy, (Yardley: Westholme), and in 2013 Daniel Graham’s Science before Socrates. Whereas Rovelli, whose main field of study is quantum gravity, argues that Anaximander was the first scientist, Graham maintains that Anaximander should not count as a scientist. Empirical science started with Anaxagoras, who used his assumption that solar eclipses occur when the moon (...)
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  28. Patricia Curd (2008). Anaxagoras and the Theory of Everything. In Patricia Curd & Daniel W. Graham (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Presocratic Philosophy. Oxford University Press
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  29. Patricia Curd, Anaxagoras. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Anaxagoras of Clazomenae (a major Greek city of Ionian Asia Minor), a Greek philosopher of the 5th century B.C.E. (born ca. 500–480), was the first of the Presocratic philosophers to live in Athens. He propounded a physical theory of “everything-in-everything,” and claimed that nous (intellect or mind) was the motive cause of the cosmos. He was the first to give a correct explanation of eclipses, and was both famous and notorious for his scientific theories, including the claims that the sun (...)
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  30. Patricia Curd (2002). The Metaphysics of Physics: Mixture and Separation in Empedocles and Anaxagoras. In Alexander P. D. Mourelatos, Victor Miles Caston & Daniel W. Graham (eds.), Presocratic Philosophy: Essays in Honour of Alexander Mourelatos. Ashgate 139--58.
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  31. Shirley M. Darcus (1977). Daimon Parallels the Holy Phren in Empedocles. Phronesis 22 (2):175-190.
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  32. J. A. Davison (1953). Protagoras, Democritus, and Anaxagoras. Classical Quarterly 3 (1-2):33-.
    Recent accounts of the life of Protagoras differ widely from one another in their treatment of the ancient sources, and in the conclusions which they draw from them. A re-examination of the evidence, undertaken in 1949–50 as part of a study of the Prometheus trilogy, has convinced me that a new discussion is urgently needed if we are to place the earlier stages of the sophistic movement in the right context historically; and the purpose of this paper is to lay (...)
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  33. Jg Defilippo (1992). Anaxagoras Noy-Sigma-Reply. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31:39-48.
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  34. Joseph G. DeFilippo (1993). Reply to Andre Laks on Anaxagoras' Νους. Southern Journal of Philosophy 31 (Supplement):39-48.
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  35. Adam Drozdek (2010). Anaxagoras and human rationality. Archiwum Historii Filozofii I Myśli Społecznej 55.
    In Anaxagoras’ system, cosmic Mind is one, indivisible and immutable and thus cannot be divided into parts, into individual minds residing in living beings. The same Mind is in one living being as it is in another. Also, the soul is an individual entity, one soul in one living being. Mind does manifest itself in a living being, not as the soul, but through the soul. Mind must be constantly present in the individual soul for the soul to be capable (...)
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  36. Adam Drozdek (2005). Anaxagoras and the Everythying in Everything Principle. Hermes 133 (2):163-177.
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  37. Shannon du Bose (1964). Anaxagoras' Theory of Mind. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 13:50-54.
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  38. John Ferguson (1971). Δinoς. Phronesis 16 (1):97-115.
  39. John Ferguson (1964). Two Notes on the Preplatonics. Phronesis 9 (2):98-106.
    (I) EMPEDOCLES DK 31 A 30: on the sun as reflected light (II) ANAXAGORAS DK 59 B 11: on stuff turning into other stuff in Anaxagoras.
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  40. Hallvard J. Fossheim (2011). From Empedocles to Wittgenstein: Historical Essays in Philosophy – Anthony Kenny. Philosophical Quarterly 61 (242):187-189.
  41. David J. Furley (1976). Anaxagoras in Response to Parmenides. Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 2:61.
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  42. David J. Furley (1970). Studies in Presocratic Philosophy. New York,Humanities Press.
  43. Daniel E. Gershenson (1964). Anaxagoras and the Birth of Physics. New York, Blaisdell Pub. Co..
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  44. L. Wolgang Gil (1985). La filosofía de Anaxágoras. Revista Venezolana de Filosofía 20:111-114.
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  45. Owen Goldin (2009). Review of Anthony Kenny, From Empedocles to Wittgenstein: Historical Essays in Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  46. Daniel W. Graham (2013). Anaxagoras and the Comet. Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):1-18.
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  47. Daniel W. Graham (2008). Anaxagoras and the Meteor. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:101-106.
    A meteor that fell in northern Greece in 467 BC was said to have been predicted by Anaxagoras. It seems rather that his theory entailed (“predicted”) the possibility of such bodies. The meteor provided a rare case of an observation confirming a theory. The subsequent recognition of the meteor shows that early philosophical theories could have testable consequences and that empirical evidence was being sought to evaluate theories at this early time.
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  48. Daniel W. Graham (2004). Was Anaxagoras a Reductionist? Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):1-18.
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  49. Daniel W. Graham (1994). The Postulates of Anaxagoras. Apeiron 27 (2):77 - 121.
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  50. Daniel W. Graham & Eric Hintz (2007). Anaxagoras and the Solar Eclipse of 478 BC. Apeiron 40 (4):319 - 344.
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