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Aristotle: Ethics* (739 | 352)
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  1. A. W. H. Adkins (1972). Moral Values and Political Behaviour in Ancient Greece: From Homer to the End of the Fifth Century. London,Chatto and Windus.
  2. A. W. H. Adkins (1972). Moral Values and Political Behaviour in Ancient Greece. New York,Norton.
  3. A. W. H. Adkins, Robert B. Louden & Paul Schollmeier (eds.) (1996). The Greeks and Us: Essays in Honor of Arthur W.H. Adkins. University of Chicago Press.
    Arthur W. H. Adkins's writings have sparked debates among a wide range of scholars over the nature of ancient Greek ethics and its relevance to modern times. Demonstrating the breadth of his influence, the essays in this volume reveal how leading classicists, philosophers, legal theorists, and scholars of religion have incorporated Adkins's thought into their own diverse research. The timely subjects addressed by the contributors include the relation between literature and moral understanding, moral and nonmoral values, and the contemporary meaning (...)
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  4. A. W. H. Adkins, Joan Kalk Lowrence, Ihara, Craig & K. (eds.) (1991). Human Virtue and Human Excellence. P. Lang.
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  5. W. H. Alexander (1937). Further Notes on the Text of Seneca's De Beneficiis. Classical Quarterly 31 (1):55-60.
    These suggestions for the betterment and elucidation of the text of the De Beneficiis are additional to those already published in the Classical Quarterly in January, 1934. They are based on a conviction much deepened since that time that Buck1 is right when he says: N allein, und zwar ohne seine Ueberarbeitungen von späteren Händen, darf die Grundlage des Textes von de beneficiis bilden. Préchac3, the latest critical editor in this field, substantially confirms Buck's sweeping conclusion by an independent survey (...)
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  6. W. H. Alexander (1935). Seneca, De Beneficiis 3.16.2. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 29:190-191.
  7. Georgios Anagnostopoulos (1996). The Golden Age of Virtue. Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):228-233.
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  8. Audrey L. Anton (2006). Breaking the Habit. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):58-66.
    Aristotle’s virtue ethics can teach us about the relationship between our habits and our actions. Throughout his works, Aristotle explains much about how one may develop a virtuous character, and little about how one might change from one character type to another. In recent years criminal law has been concerned with the issue of recidivism and how our system might reform the criminals we return to society more effectively. This paper considers how Aristotle might say a vicious person could change (...)
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  9. J. M. Armstrong (2001). Ethics. Companions to Ancient Thought: 4, Edited by Stephen Everson. Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):237-245.
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  10. John M. Armstrong (2006). Review of Gabriel Richardson Lear, Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (Princeton University Press, 2004). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):206–209.
    I review Gabriel Richardson Lear's excellent essay on Aristotle’s conception of the human good. She solves some long-standing problems in the interpretation of Aristotle’s ethics by drawing on resources in his natural philosophy and Plato’s conception of love. Her interpretation is a compelling and, to my mind, largely true account of Aristotle’s view. In this review, I summarize the book's main argument and then explain two fundamental points on which I have concerns.
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  11. John M. Armstrong (2001). Review of Stephen Everson, Ed., Ethics, Companions to Ancient Thought 4 (Cambridge University Press, 1998). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):237–245.
    I review this fine collection of articles on ancient ethics ranging from the Presocratics to Sextus Empiricus. Eight of the nine chapters are published here for the first time. Contributors include Charles H. Kahn on "Pre-Platonic Ethics," C. C. W. Taylor on "Platonic Ethics," Stephen Everson on "Aristotle on Nature and Value," John McDowell on "Some Issues in Aristotle's Moral Psychology," David Sedley on "The Inferential Foundations of Epicurean Ethics," T. H. Irwin on "Socratic Paradox and Stoic Theory," Julia Annas (...)
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  12. Norman Austin (1996). Shame and Necessity by Bernard Williams. [REVIEW] Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 89:493-493.
  13. Stefano Bacin (ed.) (2010). Etiche antiche, etiche moderne: Temi di discussione. Il Mulino.
  14. Eugenio Benitez (2004). Ancient Ethics. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (2):430-432.
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  15. Eugenio Benitez (2004). Ancient Ethics S. Everson: Ethics. Companions to Ancient Thought 4 . Pp. VII + 300. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Paper, £15.95 (Cased, £45). Isbn: 0-521-38832-5 (0-521-38161-4 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):430-.
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  16. Juan Pablo Bermúdez-Rey (2012). Nature and the Good: An Exploration of Ancient Ethical Naturalism in Cicero’s De Finibus. Pensamiento y Cultura 14:145-163.
    This paper investigates the differences between ancient Greek and modern ethical naturalism, through the account of the whole classical tradition provided by Cicero in De finibus bonorum et malorum. Ever since Hume’s remarks on the topic, it is usually held that derivations of normative claims from factual claims require some kind of proper justification. It ́s a the presence of such justifications in the Epicurean, Stoic, and Academic-Peripatetic ethical theories (as portrayed in De finibus), and, after a negative conclusion, I (...)
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  17. J. David Blankenship (1993). Virtue and Knowledge: An Introduction to Ancient Greek Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):463-467.
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  18. Ruby Blondell (1989). Helping Friends and Harming Enemies: A Study in Sophocles and Greek Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first detailed study of the plays of Sophocles through examination of a single ethical principle--the traditional Greek popular moral code of "helping friends and harming enemies." Five of the extant plays are discussed in detail from both a dramatic and an ethical standpoint, and the author concludes that ethical themes are not only integral to each drama, but are subjected to an implicit critique through the tragic consequences to which they give rise. Greek scholars and students (...)
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  19. W. Bloomer (1998). Practical Ethics for Roman Gentlemen: The Work of Valerius Maximus. C Skidmore. The Classical Review 48 (1):52-54.
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  20. W. Martin Bloomer (1998). Good Behaviour C. Skidmore: Practical Ethics for Roman Gentlemen: The Work of Valerius Maximus. Pp Xvii + 142. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1996. £30. ISBN: 0-85989-477-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (01):52-54.
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  21. R. S. Bluck (1961). Greek Moral Values Arthur W. H. Adkins: Merit and Responsibility. A Study in Greek Values. Pp. Xiv + 380. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960. Cloth, 42s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (02):127-128.
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  22. Charles Brittain (2009). Introduction. In Heda Segvic (ed.), From Protagoras to Aristotle: Essays in Ancient Moral Philosophy. Princeton University Press
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  23. Alexander Broadie (2010). Aristotle, Adam Smith and the Virtue of Propriety. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):79-89.
    Adam Smith's ethics have long been thought to be much closer to the Stoic school than to any other school of the ancient world. Recent scholarship however has focused on the fact that Smith also appears to be quite close to Aristotle. I shall attend to Smith's deployment of a version of the doctrine of the mean, shall show that it is quite close to Aristotle's, shall demonstrate that in its detailed application it is seriously at odds with Stoic teaching (...)
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  24. Christopher Buckels (2013). Compulsion to Rule in Plato's Republic. Apeiron 46 (1):63-84.
    Three problems threaten any account of philosophical rule in the Republic. First, Socrates is supposed to show that acting justly is always beneficial, but instead he extols the benefits of having a just soul. He leaves little reason to believe practical justice and psychic justice are connected and thus to believe that philosophers will act justly. In response to this problem, I show that just acts produce just souls. Since philosophers want to have just souls, they will act justly. Second, (...)
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  25. Sarah Catherine Byers (2012). Perception, Sensibility, and Moral Motivation in Augustine: A Stoic-Platonic Synthesis. Cambridge University Press.
    This book argues that Augustine assimilated the Stoic theory of perception and mental language (lekta/dicibilia), and that this epistemology underlies his accounts of motivation, affectivity, therapy for the passions, and moral progress. Byers elucidates seminal passages which have long puzzled commentators, such as Confessions 8, City of God 9 and 14, Replies to Simplicianus 1, and obscure sections of the later ‘anti-Pelagian’ works. Tracking the Stoic terminology, Byers analyzes Augustine’s engagement with Cicero, Seneca, Ambrose, Jerome, Origen, and Philo of Alexandria, (...)
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  26. W. Charlton (1978). Christopher Rowe: An Introduction to Greek Ethics. (Hutchinson University Library.) Pp. 143. London: Hutchinson, 1976. Paper, £2·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):166-.
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  27. Simon-Pierre Chevarie-Cossette (2015). Tonneau percé, tonneau habité - Calliclès et Diogène : les leçons rivales de la nature. Philosophie Antique 15:149-178.
    Comme de nombreux penseurs antiques avant et après eux et contrairement à Socrate, Calliclès et Diogène ont déclaré avoir fondé leur éthique sur l’observation de la nature. Et pourtant, les deux discours normatifs qui sont tirés d’une nature que l’on pourrait a priori croire être la même sont on ne peut plus opposés. Calliclès croit que l’homme est appelé à dominer autrui ; Diogène pense plutôt qu’il doit se dominer lui-même ; le premier est un hédoniste débridé, le second croit (...)
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  28. C. Joachim Classen (1982). Sophrosyne. The Classical Review 32 (02):204-.
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  29. Thomas F. Cleary (ed.) (1997). Living a Good Life: Advice on Virtue, Love, and Action From the Ancient Greek Masters. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.
    This collection of eminently practical advice from the likes of Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Pythagoras, and Aristotle covers subjects as diverse as money, child-raising, politics, philosophy, law, and relationships--all aspects of life and how to live it. Thomas Cleary has translated these sayings and aphorisms from the Arabic sources that preserved Greek thought throughout the Middle Ages. Many of the texts no longer exist in the original Greek. Included in the book is an appendix that presents resonant sayings and fragments from (...)
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  30. J. L. Creed (1973). Moral Values in the Age of Thucydides. Classical Quarterly 23 (02):213-.
    Thucydides describes Antipho as ‘inferior to no one of his time in and more capable than any of initiating ideas and giving expression to them’. What does he mean here by? Does it refer to ability? or does it refer to courage and consistency of principle? and in either case how are we to relate this description of Antipho to Thucydides description of Nicias as less worthy than any other Greek of the historian's day to meet with the misfortunes that (...)
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  31. Fulvia De Luise (2008). The Philosopher's Pleasure. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:41-49.
    The subject I intend to discuss deals with a problem which is central in the debate of ancient greek philosophy: the quest for happiness as the final end, the highest good for a human being. Fixing in the achievement of a life worth living the strategic aim of actions, ancient philosophers tried to define as well what a man should desire for himself to fully develop all the capabilities which lie inside human nature. On the one side they proposed major (...)
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  32. Ulrich Diehl (2013). Misologie und Misanthropie in Platons Phaidon. In H.-J. Gerigk / H. Koopmann (ed.), Hass. Darstellung und Deutung in den Wissenschaften und Künsten. Mattes Verlag
    Das Thema der Misologie und Misanthropie lässt sich wie so viele anderen philosophischen Themen der europäischen Geistesgeschichte bis zu einem platonischen Dialog zurückverfolgen. In diesem Fall handelt es sich um Platons berühmten Dialog Phaidon. Nun handelt dieser Dialog bekanntlich von der Frage nach der Unsterblichkeit der menschlichen Seele. Dennoch verweist Sokrates an einer bestimmten Stelle des Dialoges auf die für den Menschen drohenden Gefahren der Misologie und der Misanthropie hin, dem Hass auf die Vernunft und den Hass auf den Menschen, (...)
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  33. Ulrich Diehl (2006). Was ist das eigentlich, das Fromme? Zu Platons Dialog Eutyphron. In Gregor Fitzi (ed.), Platon im Diskurs. Universitätsverlag Winter
    This essay is a close reading analysis of Plato's Eutyphron coming to the conclusion that Plato's Socrates is still a model for an open minded, but critical attitude towards the ethical and metaphysical claims of religions.
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  34. Daniel A. Dombrowski (1995). Animal Minds and Human Morals: The Origins of the Western Debate. Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):637-639.
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  35. Stephen Everson (ed.) (1998). Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays provides a sophisticated and accessible introduction to the moral theories of the ancient world. It covers the ethical theories of all the major philosophers and schools from the earliest times to the Hellenistic philosophers. A substantial introduction considers the question of what is distinctive about ancient ethics.
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  36. Christian J. Feldbacher (2010). Ancient and Modern Ethics Combined. Athens Dialogues E-Journal 1 (1).
    One challenge of societies in the 21st century is the conflict of norms between different cultures. In Ancient Greece, too, such conflicts arose, and great thinkers offered great solutions. In this contribution we will argue for the following: - Ancient ethical theories were not only individual ethical theories but also social ethical theories (II). - The ancient methods of scientific examinations are useful not only in classical sciences but also in ethics (III). - Accepting the result of (III) yields highly (...)
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  37. Bronwyn Finnigan (2006). The Dialectical Method in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Phronimon 7 (2):1-15.
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  38. Christopher Gill (2009). The Passions (J.T.) Fitzgerald (Ed.) Passions and Moral Progress in Greco-Roman Thought. Pp. Xxiv + 392. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2008. Cased, £60. ISBN: 978-0-415-28069-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):80-.
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  39. Christopher Gill (1995). Curing the Passions. The Classical Review 45 (02):290-.
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  40. Christopher Gill (1995). Greek Thought. Oxford University Press.
    Four related themes in Greek thought are examined in this book: (1) personality and self, (2) ethics and values (3) individuals and communities, and (4) the idea of nature as a moral norm. Although the focus is on Greek philosophy (the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic period), links between philosophy and literature or the wider culture are also explored. The book combines a survey of recent scholarship on these topics with the author's own interpretations. It can be used by (...)
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  41. John Gould (1978). Greek Popular Morality Sir Kenneth Dover: Greek Popular Morality in the Time of Plato and Aristotle. Pp. Xix + 330. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1974. Cloth, £6·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):285-287.
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  42. Laura Grams (2007). Hipparchia of Maroneia, Cynic Cynosure. Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):335-350.
  43. Lorenzo Greco (2006). Christoph Horn, L'arte della vita nell'antichità (Roma: Carocci, 2004). [REVIEW] Rivista di Filosofia 97 (2):317-18.
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  44. A. A. Guseĭnov (2011). Antichnaia Etika.
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  45. Ilsetraut Hadot (2004). Studies on the Neoplatonist Hierocles. American Philosophical Society.
    Preface The Neoplatonist Hierocles, who lived in the fifth century ad and taught at Alexandria, has not yet received his due place in the history of ...
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  46. Jonathan Hecht (2011). Fair Play: Resolving the Crito - Apology Problem. History of Political Thought 32 (4):543-564.
    Most interpretations of the Crito, such as the absolute obligation view and the civil disobedience view, are thought to be grounded largely in an obligation of gratitude. I present arguments for why these interpretations are not viable, and then propose an alternative solution; this alternative is the obligation of fair play. While the obligation of fair play has been discussed before in relation to the Crito, this is the first full account of the position. The fair play interpretation both precludes (...)
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  47. Phillip Sidney Horky (2011). Herennius Pontius: The Construction of a Samnite Philosopher. Classical Antiquity 30 (1):119-147.
    This article explores in greater depth the historiographical traditions concerning Herennius Pontius, a Samnite wisdom-practitioner who is said by the Peripatetic Aristoxenus of Tarentum to have been an interlocutor of the philosophers Archytas of Tarentum and Plato of Athens. Specifically, it argues that extant speeches attributed to Herennius Pontius in the writings of Cassius Dio and Appian preserve a philosophy of “extreme proportional benefaction” among unequals. Greek theories of ethics among unequals such as those of Aristotle and Archytas of Tarentum, (...)
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  48. Maria Hotes (2014). Du chien au philosophe : L'analogie du chien chez Diogène et Platon. Revue de Philosophie Ancienne 32 (1):03-33.
    In this article, the author examines how Diogenes of Sinope and Plato employed the analogy of the dog in order to illustrate two very different conceptions of the philosopher. Although in both cases the analogy of the dog is used to exemplify and explain certain moral or psychological characteristics of the philosopher, the author argues that the differences between Diogenes’ and Plato’s usages of the analogy are both more essential and more philosophically significant. Thus, against those scholars who claim that (...)
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  49. Timo Hoyer (2005). Tugend Und Erziehung: Die Grundlegung der Moralpädagogik in der Antike. Julius Klinkhardt.
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  50. Christoph Jedan (2014). Cruciale Teksten: De Grieks-Romeinse Consolatio. Nederlands Theologisch Tijdschrift 68 (1 & 2):165-173.
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