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Aristotle: Ethics* (514 | 313)

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  1. A. W. H. Adkins (1972). Moral Values and Political Behaviour in Ancient Greece: From Homer to the End of the Fifth Century. London,Chatto and Windus.
  2. A. W. H. Adkins (1972). Moral Values and Political Behaviour in Ancient Greece. New York,Norton.
  3. A. W. H. Adkins, Robert B. Louden & Paul Schollmeier (eds.) (1996). The Greeks and Us: Essays in Honor of Arthur W.H. Adkins. University of Chicago Press.
    Arthur W. H. Adkins's writings have sparked debates among a wide range of scholars over the nature of ancient Greek ethics and its relevance to modern times. Demonstrating the breadth of his influence, the essays in this volume reveal how leading classicists, philosophers, legal theorists, and scholars of religion have incorporated Adkins's thought into their own diverse research. The timely subjects addressed by the contributors include the relation between literature and moral understanding, moral and nonmoral values, and the contemporary meaning (...)
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  4. A. W. H. Adkins, Joan Kalk Lowrence, Ihara, Craig & K. (eds.) (1991). Human Virtue and Human Excellence. P. Lang.
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  5. Georgios Anagnostopoulos (1996). The Golden Age of Virtue. Ancient Philosophy 16 (1):228-233.
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  6. Julia Annas (1993). The Morality of Happiness. Oxford University Press.
    Ancient ethical theories, based on the notions of virtue and happiness, have struck many as an attractive alternative to modern theories. But we cannot find out whether this is true until we understand ancient ethics--and to do this we need to examine the basic structure of ancient ethical theory, not just the details of one or two theories. In this book, Annas brings together the results of a wide-ranging study of ancient ethical philosophy and presents it in a way that (...)
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  7. Audrey L. Anton (2006). Breaking the Habit. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):58-66.
  8. John M. Armstrong (2009). Review of Frisbee C. C. Sheffield, Plato’s Symposium: The Ethics of Desire (Oxford University Press, 2006). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 29 (1):208–212.
    The purpose of Sheffield’s careful study is to increase scholarly appreciation of the Symposium as a ‘substantive work in Platonic ethics’ (3). Among the book’s highlights are a persuasive response to Vlastos’ criticism of Plato on love for individuals, an eminently reasonable assessment of the evidence for and against the presence of tripartite psychology in the Symposium, and a delightful interpretation of Alcibiades’ speech at the dialogue’s end—one that reveals elements of satyr play and corroborates rather than undermines Diotima’s account (...)
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  9. John M. Armstrong (2006). Review of Gabriel Richardson Lear, Happy Lives and the Highest Good: An Essay on Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics (Princeton University Press, 2004). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 26 (1):206–209.
    I review Gabriel Richardson Lear's excellent essay on Aristotle’s conception of the human good. She solves some long-standing problems in the interpretation of Aristotle’s ethics by drawing on resources in his natural philosophy and Plato’s conception of love. Her interpretation is a compelling and, to my mind, largely true account of Aristotle’s view. In this review, I summarize the book's main argument and then explain two fundamental points on which I have concerns.
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  10. John M. Armstrong (2001). Review of Stephen Everson, Ed., Ethics, Companions to Ancient Thought 4 (Cambridge University Press, 1998). [REVIEW] Ancient Philosophy 21 (1):237–245.
    I review this fine collection of articles on ancient ethics ranging from the Presocratics to Sextus Empiricus. Eight of the nine chapters are published here for the first time. Contributors include Charles H. Kahn on "Pre-Platonic Ethics," C. C. W. Taylor on "Platonic Ethics," Stephen Everson on "Aristotle on Nature and Value," John McDowell on "Some Issues in Aristotle's Moral Psychology," David Sedley on "The Inferential Foundations of Epicurean Ethics," T. H. Irwin on "Socratic Paradox and Stoic Theory," Julia Annas (...)
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  11. Eugenio Benitez (2004). Ancient Ethics S. Everson: Ethics. Companions to Ancient Thought 4 . Pp. VII + 300. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. Paper, £15.95 (Cased, £45). Isbn: 0-521-38832-5 (0-521-38161-4 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (02):430-.
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  12. J. David Blankenship (1993). Virtue and Knowledge: An Introduction to Ancient Greek Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 13 (2):463-467.
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  13. Ruby Blondell (1989). Helping Friends and Harming Enemies: A Study in Sophocles and Greek Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is the first detailed study of the plays of Sophocles through examination of a single ethical principle--the traditional Greek popular moral code of "helping friends and harming enemies." Five of the extant plays are discussed in detail from both a dramatic and an ethical standpoint, and the author concludes that ethical themes are not only integral to each drama, but are subjected to an implicit critique through the tragic consequences to which they give rise. Greek scholars and students (...)
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  14. W. Bloomer (1998). Practical Ethics for Roman Gentlemen: The Work of Valerius Maximus. C Skidmore. The Classical Review 48 (1):52-54.
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  15. W. Martin Bloomer (1998). Good Behaviour C. Skidmore: Practical Ethics for Roman Gentlemen: The Work of Valerius Maximus. Pp Xvii + 142. Exeter: University of Exeter Press, 1996. £30. ISBN: 0-85989-477-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (01):52-54.
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  16. R. S. Bluck (1961). Greek Moral Values Arthur W. H. Adkins: Merit and Responsibility. A Study in Greek Values. Pp. Xiv + 380. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1960. Cloth, 42s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 11 (02):127-128.
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  17. Charles Brittain (2009). Introduction. In Heda Segvic (ed.), From Protagoras to Aristotle: Essays in Ancient Moral Philosophy. Princeton University Press.
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  18. Alexander Broadie (2010). Aristotle, Adam Smith and the Virtue of Propriety. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):79-89.
    Adam Smith's ethics have long been thought to be much closer to the Stoic school than to any other school of the ancient world. Recent scholarship however has focused on the fact that Smith also appears to be quite close to Aristotle. I shall attend to Smith's deployment of a version of the doctrine of the mean, shall show that it is quite close to Aristotle's, shall demonstrate that in its detailed application it is seriously at odds with Stoic teaching (...)
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  19. Christopher Buckels (2013). Compulsion to Rule in Plato's Republic. Apeiron 46 (1):63-84.
    Journal Name: Apeiron Volume: 46 Issue: 1 Pages: 63-84.
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  20. W. Charlton (1978). Christopher Rowe: An Introduction to Greek Ethics. (Hutchinson University Library.) Pp. 143. London: Hutchinson, 1976. Paper, £2·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (01):166-.
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  21. C. Joachim Classen (1982). Sophrosyne. The Classical Review 32 (02):204-.
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  22. Thomas F. Cleary (ed.) (1997). Living a Good Life: Advice on Virtue, Love, and Action From the Ancient Greek Masters. Distributed in the U.S. By Random House.
    This collection of eminently practical advice from the likes of Socrates, Plato, Diogenes, Pythagoras, and Aristotle covers subjects as diverse as money, child-raising, politics, philosophy, law, and relationships--all aspects of life and how to live it. Thomas Cleary has translated these sayings and aphorisms from the Arabic sources that preserved Greek thought throughout the Middle Ages. Many of the texts no longer exist in the original Greek. Included in the book is an appendix that presents resonant sayings and fragments from (...)
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  23. J. L. Creed (1973). Moral Values in the Age of Thucydides. Classical Quarterly 23 (02):213-.
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  24. Fulvia De Luise (2008). The Philosopher's Pleasure. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:41-49.
    The subject I intend to discuss deals with a problem which is central in the debate of ancient greek philosophy: the quest for happiness as the final end, the highest good for a human being. Fixing in the achievement of a life worth living the strategic aim of actions, ancient philosophers tried to define as well what a man should desire for himself to fully develop all the capabilities which lie inside human nature. On the one side they proposed major (...)
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  25. Ulrich Diehl (2013). Misologie und Misanthropie in Platons Phaidon. In H.-J. Gerigk / H. Koopmann (ed.), Hass. Darstellung und Deutung in den Wissenschaften und Künsten. Mattes Verlag.
    Das Thema der Misologie und Misanthropie lässt sich wie so viele anderen philosophischen Themen der europäischen Geistesgeschichte bis zu einem platonischen Dialog zurückverfolgen. In diesem Fall handelt es sich um Platons berühmten Dialog Phaidon. Nun handelt dieser Dialog bekanntlich von der Frage nach der Unsterblichkeit der menschlichen Seele. Dennoch verweist Sokrates an einer bestimmten Stelle des Dialoges auf die für den Menschen drohenden Gefahren der Misologie und der Misanthropie hin, dem Hass auf die Vernunft und den Hass auf den Menschen, (...)
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  26. Ulrich Diehl (2006). Was ist das eigentlich, das Fromme? Zu Platons Dialog Eutyphron. In G. Fitzi (ed.), Platon im Diskurs. Universitätsverlag Winter.
  27. Daniel A. Dombrowski (1995). Animal Minds and Human Morals: The Origins of the Western Debate. Ancient Philosophy 15 (2):637-639.
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  28. Kenneth James Dover (1974/1994). Greek Popular Morality in the Time of Plato and Aristotle. Hackett.
  29. Stephen Everson (ed.) (1998). Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    This collection of essays provides a sophisticated and accessible introduction to the moral theories of the ancient world. It covers the ethical theories of all the major philosophers and schools from the earliest times to the Hellenistic philosophers. A substantial introduction considers the question of what is distinctive about ancient ethics.
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  30. Bronwyn Finnigan (2006). The Dialectical Method in Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics. Phronimon 7 (2):1-15.
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  31. C. Gill (1998). Moral Codes and Social Structure in Ancient Greece: A Sociology of Greek Ethics From Homer to the Epicureans and Stoics. JM Bryant. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (1):87-89.
  32. Christopher Gill (2009). The Passions (J.T.) Fitzgerald (Ed.) Passions and Moral Progress in Greco-Roman Thought. Pp. Xxiv + 392. Abingdon and New York: Routledge, 2008. Cased, £60. ISBN: 978-0-415-28069-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 59 (01):80-.
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  33. Christopher Gill (1998). A Sociology of Ethics J. M. Bryant: Moral Codes and Social Structure in Ancient Greece: A Sociology of Greek Ethics From Homer to the Epicureans and Stoics (SUNY Series in the Sociology of Culture). Pp. Xvi + 575. Albany: State University of New York, 1996. ISBN: 0-7914-3041-3 (0-7914-3042-1 Pbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 48 (01):87-89.
  34. Christopher Gill (1995). Curing the Passions. The Classical Review 45 (02):290-.
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  35. Christopher Gill (1995/2006). Greek Thought. Oxford University Press.
    Four related themes in Greek thought are examined in this book: (1) personality and self, (2) ethics and values (3) individuals and communities, and (4) the idea of nature as a moral norm. Although the focus is on Greek philosophy (the Presocratics, Plato, Aristotle, and the Hellenistic period), links between philosophy and literature or the wider culture are also explored. The book combines a survey of recent scholarship on these topics with the author's own interpretations. It can be used by (...)
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  36. John Gould (1978). Greek Popular Morality Sir Kenneth Dover: Greek Popular Morality in the Time of Plato and Aristotle. Pp. Xix + 330. Oxford: Basil Blackwell, 1974. Cloth, £6·50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):285-287.
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  37. Laura Grams (2007). Hipparchia of Maroneia, Cynic Cynosure. Ancient Philosophy 27 (2):335-350.
  38. A. A. Guseĭnov (2011). Antichnaia Etika.
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  39. Ilsetraut Hadot (2004). Studies on the Neoplatonist Hierocles. American Philosophical Society.
    Preface The Neoplatonist Hierocles, who lived in the fifth century ad and taught at Alexandria, has not yet received his due place in the history of ...
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  40. Timo Hoyer (2005). Tugend Und Erziehung: Die Grundlegung der Moralpädagogik in der Antike. Julius Klinkhardt.
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  41. G. B. Kerferd (1991). A. M. Batteggazzore, F. Decleva Caizzi (edd.): L'etica della ragione: ricordo di Mario Untersteiner. Pp. 187. Milan: Cisalpino–Goliardica, 1989. Paper, L. 40,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (02):526-527.
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  42. G. B. Kerferd (1967). Ethical Doxographers. The Classical Review 17 (02):156-.
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  43. Jan Fredrik Kindstrand (1981). Anacharsis, the Legend and the Apophthegmata. Distributed by Almqvist & Wiksell International.
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  44. Jill Kraye (ed.) (1997). Cambridge Translations of Renaissance Philosophical Texts. Cambridge University Press.
    The Renaissance, known primarily for the art and literature that it produced, was also a period in which philosophical thought flourished. This two-volume anthology contains 40 new translations of important works on moral and political philosophy written during the Renaissance and hitherto unavailable in English. The anthology is designed to be used in conjunction with The Cambridge History of Renaissance Philosophy, in which all of these texts are discussed. The works, originally written in Latin, Italian, French, Spanish, and Greek, cover (...)
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  45. Simone Kroschel (2008). "Wenig Verlangt Die Natur": Naturgemäss Leben, Einfachheit Und Askese Im Antiken Denken. Lang.
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  46. S. B. Levin (2012). The Doctor-Patient Tie in Plato's Laws: A Backdrop for Reflection. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 37 (4):351-372.
    The merit of Plato’s Laws remains largely untapped by those seeking genuinely collaborative models of the doctor–patient tie as alternatives to paternalism and autonomy. A persistent difficulty confronting proposed alternatives has been surpassing the notion of pronounced intellectual and values asymmetry favoring the doctor. Having discussed two prominent proposals, both of which evince marked paternalism, I argue that reflection on Plato yields four criteria that a genuinely collaborative model must meet and suggest how the Laws addresses them. In the process, (...)
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  47. A. A. Long (1983). Greek Ethics After MacIntyre and The Stoic Community of Reason. Ancient Philosophy 3 (2):184-199.
  48. Robert B. Louden (2003). Real Ethics. Ancient Philosophy 23 (2):500-502.
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  49. Robert B. Louden (1997). What is Moral Authority? Ancient Philosophy 17 (1):103-118.
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  50. Madigan (2009). Plato, Aristotle and Professor MacIntyre. Ancient Philosophy 3 (2):171 - 183.
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