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Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy

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  1. added 2015-05-21
    Carlos Lévy (2014). Roman Philosophy Under Construction: The Concept of Spatium From Lucretius to Cicero. In Christoph Horn, Christoph Helmig & Graziano Ranocchia (eds.), Space in Hellenistic Philosophy: Critical Studies in Ancient Physics. De Gruyter. 125-140.
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  2. added 2015-05-19
    Mark A. Johnstone (forthcoming). Aristotle and Alexander on Perceptual Error. Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 60 (3).
    Aristotle sometimes claims that (i) the perception of special perceptibles by their proper sense is unerring. This claim is striking, since it might seem that we quite often misperceive things like colours, sounds and smells. Aristotle also claims that (ii) the perception of common perceptibles (e.g. shape, number, movement) is more prone to error than the perception of special perceptibles. This is puzzling in its own right, and also places constraints on the interpretation of (i). I argue that reading Alexander (...)
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  3. added 2015-05-19
    Alexander Becker (2003). Plato and Formal Knowledge. In Ideal and Culture of Knowledge in Plato. 97-114.
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  4. added 2015-05-18
    Mark A. Johnstone (forthcoming). Tyrannized Souls: Plato's Depiction of the ‘Tyrannical Man'. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 23 (3):1-15.
    In book 9 of Plato's Republic, Socrates describes the nature and origins of the ‘tyrannical man’, whose soul is said to be ‘like’ a tyrannical city. In this paper, I examine the nature of the ‘government’ that exists within the tyrannical man's soul. I begin by demonstrating the inadequacy of three potentially attractive views sometimes found in the literature on Plato: the view that the tyrannical man's soul is ruled by his ‘lawless’ unnecessary appetites, the view that it is ruled (...)
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  5. added 2015-05-18
    Mark A. Johnstone (2014). On 'Logos' in Heraclitus. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 47:1-29.
    In this paper, I offer a new solution to the old problem of how best to understand the meaning of the word ‘logos’ in the extant writings of Heraclitus, especially in fragments DK B1, B2 and B50. On the view I defend, Heraclitus was neither using the word in a perfectly ordinary way in these fragments, as some have maintained, nor denoting by it some kind of general principle or law governing change in the cosmos, as many have claimed. Rather, (...)
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  6. added 2015-05-13
    Thomas G. West, Grace Starry West & Plato (1986). Charmides. Hackett Classics.
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  7. added 2015-05-10
    H. G. Alexander Aphrodisiensis, Alexander Aphrodisiensis, "de Anima Libri Mantissa": A New Edition of the Greek Text with Introduction and Commentary.
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  8. added 2015-05-10
    H. G. Alexander Aphrodisiensis (2008). Alexander, De Anima Libri Mantissa. In Alexander Aphrodisiensis, "de Anima Libri Mantissa": A New Edition of the Greek Text with Introduction and Commentary. De Gruyter. 35-142.
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  9. added 2015-05-08
    Ada Nifosi (forthcoming). PROPHETESSES. J. Guillermo Sibyls. Prophecy and Power in the Ancient World. Pp. 237, Map, Colour Pls. New York and London: Overlook Duckworth, 2013. Cased, £18.99, US$26.95. ISBN: 978-0-7156-4304-4. [REVIEW] The Classical Review:1-2.
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  10. added 2015-05-08
    Brad Berman (forthcoming). ARISTOTLE, METEOROLOGICA. M. Wilson Structure and Method in Aristotle's Meteorologica. A More Disorderly Nature. Pp. Xvi + 304, Figs. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2013. Cased, £65, US$99. ISBN: 978-1-107-04257-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review:1-2.
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  11. added 2015-05-08
    David E. Taylor (2014). Pyrrhonian Skepticism, Value Nihilism and the Good of Knowledge. Ancient Philosophy 34 (2).
    According to Sextus Empiricus, (i) the principal aim of Pyrrhonian skepticism is to achieve tranquility, and (ii) the skeptic is uniquely positioned to realize this aim. I challenge (ii) by arguing that the value nihilist—who believes that nothing is good or bad—can achieve the exact same tranquility as the skeptic. From this comparison I draw important conclusions about the relations among skepticism, tranquility and the value of knowledge.
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  12. added 2015-05-04
    S. Sara Monoson (2000). Chapter Seven. Remembering Pericles: The Political and Theoretical Import of Plato’s Menexenus. In Plato's Democratic Entanglements: Athenian Politics and the Practice of Philosophy. Princeton University Press. 181-205.
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  13. added 2015-05-01
    Georgios Tsagdis (2015). Plato's Errancy, the Voices of Truth. Parallax 21 (2):183-195.
    "Lies never happen." Yet we find ourselves facing, still, the question of truth. We face transfixed for millennia an unsetting sun, our necks twisted askew in a blinding gaze. Or is it rather, that this question, a question too great for thought and time, has not yet even unfolded? Or again, are we not perhaps caught in a more modest predicament, suspended between the two hyperboles, neither here nor there with regard (a gaze and guard at once) to truth, in (...)
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  14. added 2015-05-01
    Nancy J. Matchett (2015). Philosophy for Life and Other Dangerous Situations. [REVIEW] Philosophical Practice: Journal of the American Philosophical Practitioners Association (American Philosophical Practitioners Association) 10 (1).
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  15. added 2015-05-01
    Georgios Steiris (2014). Conclusiones Secundum Pythagoram Et Hymnos Orphei: Early Modern Reception of Ancient Greek Wisdom. In K. Maricki – Gadjanski (ed.), Antiquity and Modern World, Scientists, Researchers and Interpreters, Proceedings of the Serbian Society for Ancient Studies. Serbian Society for Ancient Studies. 372-382.
    This paper seeks to explore the way Giovanni Pico della Mirandola treated the Orphics and the Pythagoreans in his Conclusiones nongentae, his early and most ambitious work, so that he formulates his own philosophy. I do not intend to present and analyze the sum of Pico’s references to Orphics and Pythagoreans, since such an attempt is beyond the scope of this paper. Rather, I aim to highlight certain Pico’s aphorisms that allow readers to understand and evaluate his syncretic method and (...)
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  16. added 2015-04-29
    Ernesto Paparazzo (2015). Does Present-Day Symmetry Underlie the Cosmology of Plato’s Timaeus. Apeiron 48 (2):123-148.
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  17. added 2015-04-29
    Tiberiu Popa (2014). Scientific Method in Meteorology IV. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (2):306-34.
    This article explores the main aspects of Aristotle’s scientific method in Meteorology IV. Dispositional properties such as solidifiability or combustibility play a dominant role in Meteor. IV (a) in virtue of their central place in the generic division of homoeomers, based on successive differentiation and multiple differentiae, and (b) in virtue of their role in revealing otherwise undetectable characteristics of uniform materials (composition and physical structure). While Aristotle often starts with accounts of ingredients and their ratio (e.g., solids that contain (...)
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  18. added 2015-04-29
    Ramsay MacMullen (2014). Indexes. In The Classical Review. De Gruyter Open. 159-165.
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  19. added 2015-04-29
    James G. Lennox (2014). Aristotle on the Emergence of Material Complexity: Meteorology IV and Aristotle’s Biology. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 4 (2):272-305.
    In this article I defend an account of Meteorology IV as providing a material-level causal account of the emergence of uniform materials with a wide range of dispositional properties not found at the level of the four elements—the emergence of material complexity. I then demonstrate that this causal account is used in the Generation of Animals and Parts of Animals as part of the explanation of the generation of the uniform parts (tissues) and of their role in providing nonuniform parts (...)
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  20. added 2015-04-29
    Evangelos D. Protopapadakis (2014). Death is Nothing to Us: A Critical Analysis of the Epicurean Views Concerning the Dread of Death. In Ksenija Maricki Gadzanski (ed.), Antiquity and Modern World: Interpretations of Antiquity. The Serbian Society for Ancient Studies. 316-323.
    To the mind of humans death is an impossible riddle, the ultimate of mysteries; therefore it has always been considered a task of paramount importance for philosophers to provide a satisfactory account for death. Among the numerous efforts to deal with the riddle of death, Epicurus’ one stands out not only for its unsurpassed simplicity and lucidness, but also for the innovative manner in which it approaches the issue: Epicurus denounces the fear of death as a profoundly unfruitful, unreasonable and (...)
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  21. added 2015-04-29
    A. W. Lawrence (1951). Excavations at Dura-Europos. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (1):56-57.
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  22. added 2015-04-28
    Paul Carron, A Case for Virtue: Aristotle’s Psychology and Contemporary Accounts of Emotion Regulation. Images of Europe. Past, Present, Future: ISSEI 2014 - Conference Proceedings.
    This essay argues that recent evidence in neurobiology and psychology supports Aristotle’s foundational psychology and account of self-control and demonstrates that his account of virtue is still relevant for understanding human agency. There is deep correlation between the psychological foundation of virtue that Aristotle describes in The Nicomachean Ethics (NE)—namely his distinction between the rational and nonrational parts of the soul, the way that they interact, and their respective roles in self-controlled action—and dual-process models of moral judgment. Furthermore, Aristotle’s conception (...)
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  23. added 2015-04-28
    Jed Atkins (2013). Cicero's Philosophica. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):417-419.
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  24. added 2015-04-28
    Anne-Marie Schultz & Paul Carron (2013). Socratic Meditation and Emotional Self-Regulation: Human Dignity in a Technological Age. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies 25:137-160.
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  25. added 2015-04-28
    Andreas Fountoulakis (2007). Στρατηγικες Της Οδυσσειας. Συμβολη Στο Ομηρικο Ζητημα. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (2):270-271.
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  26. added 2015-04-28
    W. Thomas Schmid (2002). Socratic Dialectic in the Charmides. In Gary Alan Scott (ed.), Does Socrates Have a Method? Rethinking the Elenchus in Plato's Dialogues and Beyond. The Pennsylvania State University Press. 235-251.
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  27. added 2015-04-28
    Joanne B. Waugh (2002). Questioning the Self: A Reaction to Carvalho, Press, and Schmid. In Gary Alan Scott (ed.), Does Socrates Have a Method? Rethinking the Elenchus in Plato's Dialogues and Beyond. The Pennsylvania State University Press. 281-297.
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  28. added 2015-04-28
    Noburu Notomi (2000). Critias and the Origin of Plato's Political Philosophy. In Thomas M. Robinson & Luc Brisson (eds.), Plato: Euthydemus, Lysis, Charmides: Proceedings of the V Symposium Platonicum Selected Papers. Academia Verlag. 237-250.
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  29. added 2015-04-28
    M. J. Edwards (2000). Am I A Jew? [REVIEW] The Classical Review 50 (1):129-131.
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  30. added 2015-04-28
    R. F. Stalley (2000). Sophrosune in the Charmides. In Thomas M. Robinson & Luc Brisson (eds.), Plato: Euthydemus, Lysis, Charmides: Proceedings of the V Symposium Platonicum Selected Papers. 265-277.
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  31. added 2015-04-28
    Mauro Tulli (2000). Carmide fra poesia e ricerca. In Thomas M. Robinson & Luc Brisson (eds.), Plato: Euthydemus, Lysis, Charmides: Proceedings of the V Symposium Platonicum Selected Papers. Academia Verlag. 259-264.
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  32. added 2015-04-28
    Harold Tarrant (2000). Naming Socratic Interrogation in the Charmides. In Thomas M. Robinson & Luc Brisson (eds.), Plato: Euthydemus, Lysis, Charmides: Proceedings of the V Symposium Platonicum Selected Papers. Academia Verlag. 251-258.
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  33. added 2015-04-28
    A. S. D. (1919). Virgil, Aen. Vii. 695-6’ Again. The Classical Review 33 (7-8):144-145.
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  34. added 2015-04-28
    A. Shewan (1918). Πηοΐυχρυσοσ Μυκνηνη. The Classical Review 32 (1-2):1-9.
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  35. added 2015-04-27
    George Couvalis (forthcoming). Aristotle on Being. Modern Greek Studies (Australia and New Zealand).
    Aristotle explains existence through postulating essences that are intrinsic and percep- tion independent. I argue that his theory is more plausible than Hume’s and Russell’s theories of existence. Russell modifies Hume’s theory because he wants to allow for the existence of mathematical objects. However, Russell’s theory facilitates a problematic collapse of ontology into epistemology, which has become a feature of much analytic philosophy. This collapse obscures the nature of truth. Aristotle is to be praised for starting with a clear account (...)
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  36. added 2015-04-27
    Peter Anstey (2015). Francis Bacon and the Laws of Ramus. Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):1-23.
    This article assesses the role of the laws of the French logician and educational reformer Petrus Ramus in the writings of Francis Bacon. The laws of Ramus derive from Aristotle’s grounds for necessary propositions. Necessary propositions, according to Aristotle, Ramus, and Bacon, are required for the premises of scientific syllogisms. It is argued that in Bacon’s Advancement of Learning and De augmentis scientiarum the only role for these laws is in the transmission of knowledge that has already been acquired. However, (...)
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  37. added 2015-04-27
    Gerald A. Press (2002). The Elenchos in the Charmides 162-175. In Scott Gary Alan (ed.), Does Socrates Have a Method? Rethinking the Elenchus in Plato's Dialogues and Beyond. 252-265.
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  38. added 2015-04-27
    John M. Carvalho (2002). Certainty and Consistency in the Socratic Elenchus. In Gary Alan Scott (ed.), Does Socrates Have a Method? Rethinking the Elenchus in Plato's Dialogues and Beyond. The Pennsylvania State University Press. 266-280.
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  39. added 2015-04-27
    Julia Annas (1985). "Self-Knowledge in Early Plato". In Dominic J. O'Meara (ed.), Platonic Investigations. CUA Press. 111-138.
  40. added 2015-04-26
    Gerald Press (ed.) (2012). The Continuum Companion to Plato. Continuum International Publishers.
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  41. added 2015-04-25
    Verity Harte (forthcoming). Plato. In Hans Burkhardt, Johanna Seibt & Guido Imaguire (eds.), Handbook of Mereology. Philosophia Verlag.
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  42. added 2015-04-25
    Verity Harte (2014). The Life of Protarchus’ Choosing (Plato Philebus 20b-22c). In Mi-Kyoung Lee (ed.), Strategies of Argument: Essays in Ancient Ethics, Epistemology, and Logic. Oup Usa. 3-20.
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  43. added 2015-04-25
    Verity Harte (2014). The Nicomachean Ethics on Pleasure. In Ronald Polansky (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics. Cambridge University Press. 288-318.
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  44. added 2015-04-25
    Verity Harte (2013). Plato’s Politics of Ignorance. In Verity Harte & Melissa Lane (eds.), Politeia in Greek and Roman Philosophy. Cambridge University Press. 139-154.
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  45. added 2015-04-25
    Verity Harte (2012). Philebus. In Gerald Press (ed.), The Continuum Companion to Plato. 81-83.
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  46. added 2015-04-25
    Verity Harte (2008). Commentary on Evans. Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium in Ancient Philosophy 23:146-53.
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  47. added 2015-04-25
    Verity Harte (2008). Platonic Metaphysics. In Gail Fine (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Plato. 191-216.
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  48. added 2015-04-25
    Verity Harte (1999). Quel prix pour la vérité? (Philèbe 64a7-66d3). In Monique Dixsaut (ed.), La fêlure du plaisir: études sur le philèbe de platon. Vrin. 385-401.
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  49. added 2015-04-24
    Verity Harte (2014). Desire, Memory and the Authority of Soul: Plato Philebus 35CD. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 46:33-72.
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  50. added 2015-04-23
    W. Lindsay Wheeler (2014). Part I, The Case of the Barefoot Socrates: Academic Myth-Making and the Jewish Transformation of the West. academia.edu.
    This is not about differences in interpretation or quibbling about nuances; this is about the total disregard for facts. This book is supplemental and follow-up to “Doric Crete and Sparta, the home of Greek philosophy”. Socrates mentions that Crete and Sparta are the home of Greek philosophy and every modern scholar and academic has laughed that off. Well, they shouldn't have. They missed a ton of small clues, evidence and other material to support that contention not even touched upon in (...)
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1 — 50 / 310