Bookmark and Share

Ancient Greek and Roman Philosophy

Edited by Robin Smith (Texas A&M University)
Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 250
  1. added 2016-09-24
    Alexander Bown (2016). Epicurus on Bivalence and the Excluded Middle. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 98 (3):239-271.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie Jahrgang: 98 Heft: 3 Seiten: 239-271.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. added 2016-09-24
    Andreas Vakirtzis, Character Friendship and Moral Development in Aristotle’s Ethics.
    In my thesis, I examine the role of character friendship for the agent’s moral development in Aristotle’s ethics. I contend that we should divide character friendship in two categories: a) character friendship between completely virtuous agents, and, b) character friendship between unequally developed, or, equally developed, yet not completely virtuous agents. Regarding the first category, I argue that this highest form of friendship provides the opportunity for the agent to advance his understanding of certain virtues through the help of his (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. added 2016-09-22
    James Bardis (forthcoming). Memory and Mimesis. Heythrop Journal.
    "Memory and Mimesis" commence par une réflexion sur la relation entre l'esprit et la mémoire invoqué par un scénario quotidien de la vie d'un père jouant avec sa fille âgée d'un an dans un bistrot et extrapole, a partir de cette relation, une parallèle relation entre psychologie de l'enfant et de l'évolution humaine en termes du «développement» des formes peu profondes de la mémoire au détriment d'une mémoire plus profonde et primale incorporée dans un esprit non- épiphenominal. -/- -/- L'étude (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. added 2016-09-22
    Alexander Bown (2016). Epicurus on Truth and Falsehood. Phronesis 61 (4):463–503.
    Sextus Empiricus ascribes to Epicurus a curious account of truth and falsehood, according to which these characteristics belong to things in the world about which one speaks, not to what one says about them. I propose an interpretation that takes this account seriously and explains the connection between truth and existence that the Epicureans also seem to recognise. I then examine a second Epicurean account of truth and falsehood and show how it is related to the first.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. added 2016-09-22
    J. Clerk Shaw (2016). Poetry and Hedonic Error in Plato's Republic. Phronesis 61:373-396.
    This paper reads Republic 583b-608b as a single, continuous line of argument. First, Socrates distinguishes real from apparent pleasure and argues that justice is more pleasant than injustice. Next, he describes how pleasures nourish the soul. This line of argument continues into the second discussion of poetry: tragic pleasures are mixed pleasures in the soul that seem greater than they are; indulging them nourishes appetite and corrupts the soul. The paper argues that Plato has a novel account of the ‘paradox (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. added 2016-09-22
    David Torrijos-Castrillejo (2016). Identidad religiosa e innovación filosófica en la Atenas del siglo V a.C. In Juana Torres Silvia Acerbi (ed.), La religión como factor de identidad. Escolar y Mayo 11-20.
    The fifth century BC is one of the most brilliant of Greek history. Pericles, as the leader of a splendid Athens, promoted the entry into his polis of the new scientific movement that until then had developed primarily in Ionia and in the Italian peninsula. However, their research raised suspicions among the Athenians, who regarded it as a risk for traditional religion. In spite of the somewhat flexible and plural character of the Greek religion, in this period three famous trials (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. added 2016-09-21
    Alejandro Farieta (2016). La objeción de aristóteles a la teoría platónica de la reminiscencia. Pensamiento y Cultura 18 (2):6-28.
    This paper provides an interpretation of Aristotle’s criticism to the solution to Meno’s Paradox suggested by Plato. According to Aristotle, when Plato says that reminiscence (anámnēsis) is achieved, what is actually achieved is induction (epagōgê). Our interpretation is based on two aspects: (1) semantic criticism, since Plato’s use of the term anámnēsis is unusual; and (2) the theory is not able to give an adequate explanation of the effective discovery.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. added 2016-09-17
    Manzo Silvia (2014). Possibilitas – Materia (Cusanus). In Manuductiones. Festschrift zu Ehren von Jorge M. Machetta und Claudia DʼAmico. Aschendorff 191-209.
    La concepción cusana de la possibilitas / materia (posibilidad / materia) está directamente ligada con la doctrina de los modos de ser (modi essendi) sobre los que el Cusano se explaya, con diversos grados de profundidad, en varias de sus obras, entre las que se cuenta De docta ignorantia (1440), De conjecturis (1440), De Mente (1450), De venatione sapientiae (1462) y De ludo globi (1463). A lo largo de esas obras Nicolás de Cusa aborda dos aspectos centrales de la posibilidad (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. added 2016-09-14
    Kathrin Koslicki (2006). Aristotle’s Mereology And The Status Of Form. Journal of Philosophy 103 (12):715-736.
    In a difficult but fascinating passage in Metaphysics Z.17, Aristotle puts forward a proposal, by means of a regress argument, according to which a whole or matter/form-compound is one or unified, in contrast to a heap, due to the presence of form or essence. This proposal gives rise to two central questions: (i) the question of whether form itself is to be viewed, literally and strictly speaking, as part of the matter/form-compound; and (ii) the question of whether form is to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. added 2016-09-14
    Lane Cooper & George Santayana (1911). Three Philosophical Poets: Lucretius, Dante, and Goethe. Philosophical Review 20 (4):443.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. added 2016-09-13
    E. J. Kenney (ed.) (2014). Lucretius: De Rerum Naturabook Iii. Cambridge University Press.
    The third book of Lucretius' great poem on the workings of the universe is devoted entirely to expounding the implications of Epicurus' dictum that death does not matter, 'is nothing to us'. The soul is not immortal: it no more exists after the dissolution of the body than it had done before its birth. Only if this fact is accepted can men rid themselves of irrational fears and achieve the state of ataraxia, freedom from mental disturbance, on which the Epicurean (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. added 2016-09-12
    Donald J. Zeyl & R. E. Allen (1988). The Dialogues of Plato. Vol. 1: Euthyphro, Apology, Crito, Meno, Gorgias, Menexenus. Philosophical Review 97 (2):244.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. added 2016-09-07
    Myles Burnyeat (2001). A Map of Metaphysics Zeta. Mathesis.
  14. added 2016-09-07
    Michael Frede & Günther Patzig (1988). Aristoteles Metaphysik Ζ. C. H. Beck.
  15. added 2016-09-06
    Matthew Duncombe (2015). The Role of Relatives in Plato’s Partition Argument, Republic IV 436b9- 439c9. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 48:37-60.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. added 2016-09-05
    Holly G. Moore (2016). The Psychagogic Work of Examples in Plato's Statesman. Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (3):300.
    This paper concerns the role of examples (paradeigmata) as propaedeutic to philosophical inquiry, in light of the methodological digression of Plato’s Statesman. Consistent with scholarship on Aristotle’s view of example, scholars of Plato’s work have privileged the logic of examples over their rhetorical appeal. Following a small but significant trend in rhetorical scholarship that emphasizes the affective nature of examples, this essay assesses the psychagogic potential of paradeigma, following the discussion of examples in Plato’s Statesman. I argue that, by creating (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. added 2016-09-05
    Italo Testa & Matteo Bianchin (eds.) (2015). "Life and Action in Ethics and Politics", Book Symposium on Michael Thompson's "Life and Action". Philosophy and Public Issues, Supplementary Volume (2015), Luiss University Press.
    Book Symposium on Michael Thompson's "Life and Action" -/- (downlodable here: http://fqp.luiss.it/category/numero/ns-supplementary-volume-2015-life-and-action) -/- Table of Contents: -/- Paolo Costa, "Where does our understanding of life come from? The riddle about recognizing living things" -/- Constantine Sandis, "He buttered the toast while baking a fresh loaf" -/- Matteo Bianchin, "Intentions and Intentionality" -/- Arto Laitinen, "Practices as ‘actual’ sources of goodness of actions" -/- Italo Testa, "Some consequences of Thompson’s Life and Action for social philosophy" -/- Ingrid Salvatore, "Thompson on Rawls (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. added 2016-09-03
    David Forman (2016). The Apokatastasis Essays in Context: Leibniz and Thomas Burnet on the Kingdom of Grace and the Stoic/Platonic Revolutions. In Wenchao Li (ed.), Für Unser Glück oder das Glück Anderer. Vorträge des X. Internationalen Leibniz-Kongresses. Olms Bd. IV, 125-137.
    One of Leibniz’s more unusual philosophical projects is his presentation (in a series of unpublished drafts) of an argument for the conclusion that it is necessary that a time will come when “nothing would happen that had not happened before." Leibniz’s presentations of the argument for such a cyclical cosmology are all too brief, and his discussion of its implications is obscure. Moreover, the conclusion itself seems to be at odds with the main thrust of Leibniz’s own metaphysics. Despite this, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. added 2016-09-03
    Boris Hennig (2009). The Four Causes. Journal of Philosophy 106 (3):137-160.
  20. added 2016-09-02
    Esteban J. Beltrán Ulate (2016). θεός como otredad: una lectura del pensamiento aristotélico. Universitas Philosophica 33 (67):184-199.
    La investigación asume el estudio de la " otredad " en el pensamiento aristo-télico, profundizando el carácter del θεός. Se procura responder a la pregun-ta: ¿Qué es " otro " (ἄλλος)? y ¿Cómo es entendida la otredad (ἑτερότης) por Aristóteles? para así, en un último escenario. esbozar una reflexión a propó-sito de θεός como otredad (ἑτερότης), radicalizando las tesis aristotélicas.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. added 2016-09-01
    Kelly E. Arenson (forthcoming). Impure Intellectual Pleasure and the Phaedrus. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy.
    This paper considers how Plato can account for the fact that pain features prominently in the intellectual pleasures of philosophers, given that in his view pleasures mixed with pain are ontologically deficient and inferior to ‘pure,’ painless pleasures. After ruling out the view that Plato does not believe intellectual pleasures are actually painful, I argue that he provides a coherent and overlooked account of pleasure in the Phaedrus, where purity does not factor into the philosopher’s judgment of pleasures at all; (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. added 2016-09-01
    Vanessa de Harven (forthcoming). Review of Rene Brouwer, The Stoic Sage, Cambridge, 2014. [REVIEW] Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 100 (2).
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. added 2016-09-01
    Kelly E. Arenson (2016). Review of Kurt Lampe, The Birth of Hedonism: The Cyrenaic Philosophers and Pleasure as a Way of Life. [REVIEW] Polis 33 (1):205-9.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. added 2016-09-01
    Ada Bronowski (2014). La Structure Logique du Langage Ordinaire chez les Stoiciens. In Jean-Michel Counet (ed.), Philosophie et Langage Ordinaire de l'Antiquité a' la Renaissance. Edition Peeters 83-96.
    Rather than considering ordinary language as deficient and incapable of grasping the structure of reality, the Stoics set out a theory, based on their notion of a lekton, by which ordinary language is a reflection of the structure of lekta which themselves are constitutive of reality.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. added 2016-09-01
    Christopher Gill (2013). Marcus Aurelius: Meditations, Books 1-6. Oxford University Press.
    Christopher Gill provides a new translation and commentary on the first half of Marcus Aurelius' Meditations, and a full introduction to the Meditations as a whole. The Meditations constitute a unique and remarkable work, a reflective diary or notebook by a Roman emperor, that is based on Stoic philosophy but presented in a highly distinctive way. This new edition will help students and scholars of ancient philosophy make sense of a work whose intellectual content and status have often been found (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. added 2016-09-01
    O. Hense (1905). C. Musonii Rufi Reliquiae. Teubner.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. added 2016-09-01
    Rafael Ferber, Plato as Teacher of Socrates?
    What distinguishes the Socrates of the early from the Socrates of the middle dialogues? According to a well-known opinion, the “dividing line” lies in the difference between the Socratic and the Platonic theory of action. Whereas for the Platonic Socrates of the early dialogues, all desires are good-dependent, for the Platonic Socrates of the middle dialogues, there are good-independent desires. The paper argues first that this “dividing line” is blurred in the "Symposium", and second that we have in the "Symposium" (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. added 2016-08-31
    Mitchell Miller (2015). 'Making New Gods? A Reflection on the Gift of the Symposium. In Debra Nails, Harold Tarrant, Mika Kajava & Eero Salmenkivi (eds.), Second Sailing: Alternative Perspectives on Plato. Societas Scientiarum Fennica 285-306.
    A commentary on the Symposium as a challenge and a gift to Athens. I begin with a reflection on three dates: 416 bce, the date of Agathon’s victory party, c. 400, the approximate date of Apollodorus’ retelling of the party, and c. 375, the approximate date of the ‘publication’ of the dialogue, and I argue that Plato reminds his contemporary Athens both of its great poetic and legal and scientific traditions and of the historical fact that the way late fourth (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. added 2016-08-31
    Mitchell Miller (2013). Non-Bifurcatory Diairesis and Greek Music Theory: A Resource for Plato in the Statesman? In Ales Havlicek, Jakub Jirsa & Karel Thein (eds.), Plato's Statesman: Proceedings of the Eighth Symposium Platonicum Pragense. OIKOUMENH 178-200.
    At 287c of the Statesman the Eleatic Visitor — or, more deeply, Plato — faces a daunting task. Because statesmanship has been shown to collaborate with “countless” other arts that share with it the work of “caring” for the city, to understand statesmanship requires distinguishing these arts into an intelligible set of kinds and recognizing how these might go together. Accordingly, the Visitor abandons the mode of division he has practiced without exception up until this moment, bifurcation or “halving,” and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. added 2016-08-31
    Mitchell Miller (2007). Essay Review of Eva Bran, The Music of the Republic. International Journal of the Classical Tradition 13 (4):628-633.
    The essays in this collection, though ranging in their keys from the teacherly to the scholarly, are united by their search for the deepest questions Plato gives us. The title essay on the Republic is a paradigm case, exploring with a mix of speculative daring and Socratic pleasure in aporia the ring structure of the dialogue, the emergent perspective of a "knowing soul," dianoetic eikasia, and the implicit presence of the One and the Dyad in the metaphysical figures of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. added 2016-08-31
    Mitchell Miller (1999). Platonic Mimesis. In Thomas Falkner, Nancy Felson & David Konstan (eds.), Contextualizing Classics: Ideology, Performance, Dialogue. 253-266.
    A two-fold study, on the one hand of the thought-provoking mimesis by which Plato gives his hearer an occasion for self-knowledge and self-transcendence and of the typical sequential structure, an appropriation of the trajectory of the poem of Parmenides, by which Plato orders the drama of inquiry, and on the other hand a commentary on the Crito that aims to show concretely how these elements — mimesis and Parmenidean structure — work together to give the dialogues their exceptional elicitative power.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. added 2016-08-31
    Mitchell Miller (1983). The Implicit Logic of Hesiod's Cosmogony. Independent Journal of Philosophy:131-142.
    A close examination of the implicit logic that guides Hesiod's account of the genesis of the cosmos in the Theogony 116-133, with special attention to his choice of Chaos as the first born and to the logical relations between opposites and between whole and parts as these emerge within, as the structuring principles of, Hesiod's ordering of the births of cosmic elements.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. added 2016-08-30
    Matthew Crippen (forthcoming). Dewey on Arts, Sciences and Greek Philosophy. In András Benedek & Agnes Veszelszki (eds.), Visual Learning: Time - Truth - Tradition. Peter Lang
  34. added 2016-08-30
    Mitchell Miller (2013). On Reading the Laws as a Whole: Horizon, Vision, and Structure. In Eric Sanday & Gregory Recco (eds.), Plato's Laws: Force and Truth in Politics. Indiana University Press 11-30.
    A reflection intended to orient a reading of the Laws as a whole, with special attention to the range of philosophical issues included and excluded from the Athenian's reach, as this is indicated by the dramatic context, to the vision of the god as the measure of the laws that provides the centering goal of the Athenian's labors, and to the dialectical structure of the Athenian's address to the Magnesians.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. added 2016-08-30
    Mitchell Miller (2010). A More 'Exact Grasp' of the Soul? Tripartition of the Soul in Republic IV and Dialectic in the Philebus. In Kurt Pritzl (ed.), Truth. Catholic University of America Press 57-135.
    At Republic 435c-d and again at 504b-e, Plato has Socrates object to the city/soul analogy and declare that a “longer way” is necessary for gaining a more “exact grasp” of the soul. I argue that it is in the Philebus, in Socrates’ presentation of the “god-given” method of dialectic and in his distinctions of the kinds of pleasure and knowledge, that Plato offers the resources for reaching this alternative account. To show this, I explore (1) the limitations of the tripartition (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. added 2016-08-30
    Mitchell Miller (2008). The Pleasures of the Comic and of Socratic Inquiry. Arethusa 41 (2):263-289.
    At Apology 33c Socrates explains that "some people enjoy … my company" because "they … enjoy hearing those questioned who think they are wise but are not." At Philebus 48a-50b he makes central to his account of the pleasure of laughing at comedy the exposé of the self-ignorance of those who presume themselves wise. Does the latter passage explain the pleasure of watching Socrates at work? I explore this by tracing the admixture of pain, the causes, and the "natural harmony" (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. added 2016-08-30
    Mitchell Miller (2003). The Timaeus and the Longer Way. In Gretchen Reydams-Schils (ed.), Plato's Timaeus as Cultural Icon. University of Notre Dame Press 17-59.
    A study of the significance of Plato's resumption of the simile of model and likeness in the Timaeus, with attention to the place of the Timaeus in the "longer way" that Plato has Socrates announce in the Republic. The reader embarked on the "longer way," I argue, will find in the accounts of the elements and of the kinds of animals unannounced but detailed exhibitions of the "god-given" method of dialectic that Plato has Socrates announce in the Philebus.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. added 2016-08-30
    Mitchell Miller (1995). The Choice Between the Dialogues and the 'Unwritten Teachings': A Scylla and Charybdis for the Interpreter? In Francisco Gonzalez (ed.), The Third Way: New Directions in Platonic Studies. Rowman and Littlefield 225-244.
    Must the interpreter of the Platonic dialogues choose between the so-called "unwritten teachings" reported by Aristotle in Metaphysics A6 and the dialogues? I argue, on the contrary, that a reading of the dialogues that is sensitive to their pedagogical irony will find the "unwritten teachings" exhibited in them. I identify the key teachings in Metaphysics A6, show how the Parmenides and the Philebus point to them, and explicate a full exhibition of them in the Statesman.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. added 2016-08-30
    Mitchell Miller (1985). Platonic Provocations: Reflections on the Soul and the Good in the Republic. In Dominic O'Meara (ed.), Platonic Investigations. Catholic University of America Press 163-193.
    Reflections on the linkage between and the provocative force of problems in the analogy of city and soul, in the simile-bound characterization of the Good, and in the performative tension between what Plato has Socrates say about the philosopher's disinclination to descend into the city and what he has Socrates do in descending into the Piraeus to teach, with a closing recognition of the analogy between Socratic teaching and Platonic writing.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. added 2016-08-29
    Stefano Maso Francesca G. Masi (ed.) (2015). Epicurus on Eidola. Peri Phuseos Book II. Update, Proposals, and Discussions.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. added 2016-08-29
    Catherine Osborne (1983). Archimedes on the Dimensions of the Cosmos. Isis 74 (2):234-242.
  42. added 2016-08-27
    Leone Gazziero (2016). "Aucun attribut universel n’est une substance" (Aristotelis Metaphysica, Z, 13, 1038b 35). Aristote critique des Idées de Plato. Annuaire de l'École Pratique des Hautes Études 123:121-142.
    Y a-t-il des Idées et peut-on démontrer qu’elles existent ? Parmi les protagonistes anciens de la controverse qui a opposé partisans et adversaires des Idées, Aristote mérite une attention toute particulière. De fait, si – au moment où Aristote intervient dans le débat autour de l’hypothèse des Idées – ce débat a déjà une histoire, c’est avec lui que cette histoire atteint une maturité qui est à la fois d’ordre doctrinal et doxographique. De fait, non seulement Aristote est le premier (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. added 2016-08-27
    David Chai (2015). Raphals, Lisa. Divination and Prediction in Early China and Ancient Greece. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 10 (2):322-326.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. added 2016-08-26
    Stefano Maso (2015). Grasp and Dissent. Cicero and Epicurean Philosophy. Brepols.
    The present study centres on the distinctive characteristics of Cicero's philosophical training. Not only does Cicero exhibit his lofty philosophical proficiency anchored in the Academic school, but he also proves an excellent authority on Epicurus's proposed philosophy.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. added 2016-08-26
    Stefano Maso (2015). Images and Truth. In Stefano Maso Francesca G. Masi (ed.), Epicurus on eidola. Peri Phuseos Book II. Update, Proposals, and Discussions. 67-92.
    The new edition of the papiri of the second book of 'Peri Phuseos' allows for a detailed reconstruction of the mechanisms of vision. Some of the characteristic features of images according to Epicurus are presented here for the first time. One of the problems is the congruence between the representation and the object from which it originates: i.e. the truth of the image.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. added 2016-08-26
    Stefano Maso & Francesca G. Masi (2015). Epicurus on Eidola. Peri Phuseos Book II. Update, Proposals, and Discussions. Hakkert.
    This book collects nine contributions on the second book of the book "On Nature" of Epicurus. At the center is the problem of "images." In the Appendix, the new critical text edited by Giuliana Leone is published.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. added 2016-08-26
    Stefano Maso (2013). Quarundam Rerum Initia in Nostra Potestate Sunt. In Stefano Maso Francesca Masi (ed.), Fate, Chance, and Fortune in Ancient Thought. 125-144.
    Does the Stoic school really, accepting fate, reject free will? It would seem so, mainly if we read the evidences of Zeno or Chrysippus. The Stoic Senecais central to this particular theoretical inquiry, which hinges on the concepts of causality, of determinism and responsibility.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. added 2016-08-23
    Raymond Van Dam (2016). Emperors and Ancestors: Roman Rulers and the Constraints of Tradition by Olivier Hekster. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):562-564.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. added 2016-08-23
    Benjamin Eldon Stevens (2016). Smell and Sociocultural Value Judgment in Catullus. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):465-486.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. added 2016-08-23
    William Thalmann (2016). Playing Hesiod: The “Myth of the Races” in Classical Antiquity by Helen van Noorden. Classical World: A Quarterly Journal on Antiquity 109 (4):559-560.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 250