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  1. Suzy Anger (2005). Victorian Interpretation. Cornell University Press.
    Victorian scriptural hermeneutics : history, intention, and evolution -- Intertext 1 : Victorian legal interpretation -- Carlyle : between biblical exegesis and romantic hermeneutics -- Intertext 2 : Victorian science and hermeneutics : the interpretation of nature -- George Eliot's hermeneutics of sympathy -- Intertext 3 : Victorian literary criticism -- Subjectivism, intersubjectivity, and intention : Oscar Wilde and literary hermeneutics.
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  2. David Armstrong (2008). Be Angry and Sin Not" : Philodemus Versus the Stoics on Natural Bites and Natural Emotions. In John T. Fitzgerald (ed.), Passions and Moral Progress in Greco-Roman Thought. Routledge. 79--121.
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  3. Judith Barad (2000). Aquinas and the Role of Anger in Social Reform. Logos 3 (1).
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  4. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (2002). Are Envy, Anger, and Resentment Moral Emotions? Philosophical Explorations 5 (2):148 – 154.
    The moral status of emotions has recently become the focus of various philosophical investigations. Certain emotions that have traditionally been considered as negative, such as envy, jealousy, pleasure-in-others'-misfortune, and pride, have been defended. Some traditionally "negative" emotions have even been declared to be moral emotions. In this brief paper, I suggest two basic criteria according to which an emotion might be considered moral, and I then examine whether envy, anger, and resentment are moral emotions.
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  5. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (1992). Anger and Hate. Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (2):85-110.
  6. Kristin Borgwald (2012). Women's Anger, Epistemic Personhood, and Self-Respect: An Application of Lehrer's Work on Self-Trust. Philosophical Studies 161 (1):69-76.
    I argue in this paper that the work of Keith Lehrer, especially in his book Self-Trust has applications to feminist ethics; specifically care ethics, which has become the leading form of normative sentimentalist ethics. I extend Lehrer's ideas concerning reason and justification of belief beyond what he says by applying the notion of evaluation central to his account of acceptance to the need for evaluation of emotions. The inability to evaluate and attain justification of one's emotions is an epistemic failure (...)
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  7. S. H. Braund (1982). Anger and Indifference in Juvenal Franco Bellandi: Etica diatribica e protesta sociale nelle Satire di Giovenale. (Opuscula Philologa, 2.) Pp. vi + 115. Bologna: Pàtron, 1980. Paper, L. 5,000. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 32 (02):169-170.
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  8. Anne Campbell & Steven Muncer (1987). Models of Anger and Aggression in the Social Talk of Women and Men. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 17 (4):489–511.
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  9. Joy Connolly (2003). ANGER IN ANTIQUITY W. V. Harris: Restraining Rage: The Ideology of Anger Control in Classical Antiquity . Pp. Xii + 468. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2001. Cased, $49.95. ISBN: 0-674-00618-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 53 (01):117-.
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  10. Anthony Cunningham (2005). Great Anger. The Dalhousie Review 85 (3).
    Anger has an undeniable hand in human suffering and horrific deeds. Various schools of thought call for eliminating or moderating the capacity for anger. I argue that the capacity for anger, like the capacity for grief, is at the heart of our humanity.
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  11. Nicholas J. H. Dent (2000). 'Anger is a Short Madness': Dealing with Anger in Émile's Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 34 (2):313–325.
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  12. Leonidas Donskis (2007). David Ost, the Defeat of Solidarity: Anger and Politics in pOstcommunist Europe. Studies in East European Thought 59 (3):251-253.
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  13. Paul Ekamn & Daniel Cordaro (2011). What is Meant by Calling Emotions Basic. Emotion Review 3 (4): Emotion Review October 2364-370.
    Emotions are discrete, automatic responses to universally shared, culture-specific and individual-specific events. The emotion terms, such as anger, fear, etcetera, denote a family of related states sharing at least 12 characteristics, which distinguish one emotion family from another, as well as from other affective states. These affective responses are preprogrammed and involuntary, but are also shaped by life experiences.
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  14. Eva-Maria Engelen (2009). Anger, Shame and Justice: The Regulative Function of Emotions in the Ancient and Modern World. In Birgitt Röttger-Rössler & Hans Markowitsch (eds.), Emotions as Bio-cultural Processes. Springer. 395-413.
    Analyzing the ancient Greek point of view concerning anger, shame and justice and a very modern one, one can see, that anger has a regulative function, but shame does as well. Anger puts the other in his place, thereby regulating hierarchies. Shame regulates the social relations of recognition. And both emotions also have an evaluative function, because anger evaluates a situation with regard to a humiliation; shame, with regard to a misdemeanor. In addition, attention has to be paid to the (...)
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  15. Marco Fantuzzi (2004). Apollonian anger P. dräger: Die argonautika Des Apollonios rhodios. Das zweite Zorn-epos der griechischen literatur . Pp. VIII + 174. Munich and leipzig: K. G. saur, 2001. Cased, €80. Isbn: 3-598-77707-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 54 (01):44-.
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  16. Jeffrey Fish (2004). Anger, Philodemus' Good King, and the Helen Episode of Aeneid 2.567-589 : A New Proof of Authenticity From Herculaneum. In David Armstrong (ed.), Vergil, Philodemus, and the Augustans. University of Texas Press.
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  17. Elisa Gambetti & Fiorella Giusberti (2008). Dispositional Anger and Risk Decision-Making. Mind and Society 8 (1):7-20.
    In this study, we assessed the influence of trait anger on decisions in risky situations evaluating how it might interact with some contextual factors. One hundred and fifty-eight participants completed the Trait Anger scale of STAXI-2 (T-Ang) and an inventory consisting of a battery of hypothetical everyday decision-making scenarios, representative of three specific domains: financial, social and health. Participants were also asked to evaluate familiarity and salience for each scenario. This study provides evidence for a relationship between individual differences in (...)
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  18. Heather J. Gert (1998). Anger and Chess. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):249-265.
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  19. Simon Goldhill (2005). Anger S. Braund, G. Most (Eds.): Ancient Anger. Perspectives From Homer to Galen . (Yale Classical Studies 32.) Pp. X + 325. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2003. Cased, £45, US$65. ISBN: 0-521-82625-X. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 55 (01):178-.
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  20. Christopher W. Gowans (2010). Medical Analogies in Buddhist and Hellenistic Thought: Tranquillity and Anger. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 85 (66):11-.
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  21. Fred Guyette (2005). Anger and Christian Love. Journal for Peace and Justice Studies 15 (1):66-82.
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  22. W. V. Harris (1997). Saving the Φαινόμενα: A Note on Aristotle's Definition of Anger. Classical Quarterly 47 (02):452-.
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  23. Graham Haydon (1999). 7. Is There Virtue in Anger? Journal of Philosophy of Education 33 (1):59–66.
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  24. Jeremy Horder (1996). Reasons for Anger: A Response to Narayan and von Hirsch's Provocation Theory. Criminal Justice Ethics 15 (2):63-69.
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  25. Julie A. Hubbard (2005). Eliciting and Measuring Children's Anger in the Context of Their Peer Interactions: Ethical Considerations and Practical Guidelines. Ethics and Behavior 15 (3):247 – 258.
    Ecologically valid procedures for eliciting and measuring children's anger are needed to enhance researchers' theories of children's emotional competence and to guide intervention efforts aimed at reactive aggression. The purpose of this article is to describe a laboratory-based game-playing procedure that has been used successfully to elicit and measure children's anger across observational, physiological, and self-report channels. Steps taken to ensure that participants are treated ethically and fairly are discussed. The article highlights recently published data that emphasize the importance of (...)
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  26. Paul M. Hughes (1995). Moral Anger, Forgiving, and Condoning. Journal of Social Philosophy 26 (1):103-118.
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  27. Giovanni Indelli (2004). The Vocabulary of Anger in Philodemus' de Ira and Vergil's Aeneid. In David Armstrong (ed.), Vergil, Philodemus, and the Augustans. University of Texas Press.
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  28. Niranjan S. Karnik (2000). Foster Children and ADHD: Anger, Violence, and Institutional Power. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 21 (4):199-214.
    This paper explores the ways in which foster children and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) intersect as social and medical categories. Through the method of interpretive biography based on the official case file, this paper shows how the experiences of violence and ADHD become linked in the child's life through the emotion of anger. In this way, it is possible to see how the power dynamics of the medical, educational and welfare systems lock the diagnosis with its embedded meanings into (...)
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  29. James Ker (2009). Seneca on Self-Examination : Rereading On Anger 3.36. In Shadi Bartsch & David Wray (eds.), Seneca and the Self. Cambridge University Press.
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  30. Kristin L. Kirschner (2001). Rethinking Anger and Advocacy in Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 1 (3):60-62.
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  31. Kristjan Kristjansson (2005). Can We Teach Justified Anger? Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (4):671-689.
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  32. Stephen Leighton (2003). Aristotle’s Exclusion of Anger From the Experience of Tragedy. Ancient Philosophy 23 (2):361-381.
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  33. Stephen Leighton (2002). Aristotle's Account of Anger: Narcissism and Illusions of Self-Sufficiency. Ratio 15 (1):23–45.
    This paper considers an allegation by M. Stocker and E. Hegeman that Aristotle’s account of anger yields a narcissistic passion bedevilled by illusions of self-sufficiency. The paper argues on behalf of Aristotle’s valuing of anger within a virtuous and flourishing life, showing that and why Aristotle’s account is neither narcissistic nor involves illusions of self-sufficiency. In so arguing a deeper appreciation of Aristotle’s understanding of a self-sufficient life is reached, as are some interesting contrasts between Aristotle's understanding of anger, its (...)
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  34. Robert W. Levenson (2011). Basic Emotion Questions. Emotion Review 3 (4):379-386.
    Among discrete emotions, basic emotions are the most elemental; most distinct; most continuous across species, time, and place; and most intimately related to survival-critical functions. For an emotion to be afforded basic emotion status it must meet criteria of: (a) distinctness (primarily in behavioral and physiological characteristics), (b) hard-wiredness (circuitry built into the nervous system), and (c) functionality (provides a generalized solution to a particular survival-relevant challenge or opportunity). A set of six emotions that most clearly meet these criteria (enjoyment, (...)
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  35. H. Lloyd-Jones (2002). Curses and Divine Anger in Early Greek Epic: The Pisander Scholion. Classical Quarterly 52 (1):1-14.
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  36. Roderick T. Long, Thinking Our Anger.
    (to table of contents of archives) This talk was delivered at the Auburn Philosophical Society’s Roundtable on Hate, 5 October 2001, convened in response to the September 11 attacks a month earlier. The events of September 11th have occasioned a wide variety of responses, ranging from calls to turn the other cheek, to calls to nuke half the Middle East—and every imaginable shade of opinion in between. At a time when emotions run high, how should we go about deciding on (...)
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  37. Bryan N. Massingale (2003). Anger and Human Transcendance. Philosophy and Theology 15 (1):217-228.
    In the aftermath of the racial disturbances that rocked the United States during the summer of 1967, the official government commission formed to investigate its causes noted: “…certain fundamental matters are clear. Of these, the most fundamental is the racial attitude and behavior of white Americans toward black Americans. Race prejudice has shaped our history decisively; it now threatens to affect our future” (U.S. Riot Commission, 1968, 203; emphasis added). Given the indisputable influence of racism and the ideology of white (...)
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  38. Jen Mcweeny (2010). Liberating Anger, Embodying Knowledge: A Comparative Study of María Lugones and Zen Master Hakuin. Hypatia 25 (2):295 - 315.
    This paper strengthens the theoretical ground of feminist analyses of anger by explaining how the angers of the oppressed are ways of knowing. Relying on insights created through the juxtaposition of Latina feminism and Zen Buddhism, I argue that these angers are special kinds of embodied perceptions that surface when there is a profound lack of fit between a particular bodily orientation and its framing world of sense. As openings to alternative sensibilities, these angers are transformative, liberatory, and deeply epistemohgical.
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  39. Ermin Francis Micka (1943). The Problem of Divine Anger in Arnobius and Lactantius. Washington, D.C.,The Catholic University of America Press.
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  40. Michael Potegal (2005). Characteristics of Anger: Notes for a Systems Theory of Emotion. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (2):215-216.
    Although emotion may subserve social function, as with anger-maintaining dominance, emotions are more than variant cognitions. Anger promotes risk-taking, attention-narrowing, and cognitive impairment. The proposition that appraised “blameworthiness” is necessary for anger excludes young children's anger as well as adults' pain-induced anger. To be complete, any systems model of anger must account for its temporal characteristics, including escalation and persistence.
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  41. Robert J. Rabel (2004). Restraining Rage: The Ideology of Anger Control in Classical Antiquity, by William V. Harris. Ancient Philosophy 24 (1):238-244.
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  42. Raffaele Rodogno (2010). Guit, Anger, and Retribution. Legal Theory 16 (1):59-76.
    This article focuses primarily on the emotion of guilt as providing a justification for retributive legal punishment. In particular, I challenge the claim according to which guilt can function as part of our epistemic justification of positive retributivism, that is, the view that wrongdoing is both necessary and sufficient to justify punishment. I show that the argument to this conclusion rests on two premises: (1) to feel guilty typically involves the judgment that one deserves punishment; and (2) those who feel (...)
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  43. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty (1998). The Political Sources of Emotions: Greed and Anger. Philosophical Studies 89 (2-3):21-33.
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  44. Michael Rota (2007). The Moral Status of Anger: Thomas Aquinas and John Cassian. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 81 (3):395-418.
    Is anger at another person ever a morally excellent thing? Two competing answers to this question can be found in the Christian intellectual tradition. JohnCassian held that anger at another person is never morally virtuous. Aquinas, taking an Aristotelian line, maintained that anger at another person is sometimes morally virtuous. In this paper I explore the positions of Cassian and Aquinas on this issue. The core of my paper consists in a close examination of two arguments given by Aquinas in (...)
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  45. Kirk R. Sanders (2009). On a Causal Notion in Philodemus' on Anger. Classical Quarterly 59 (02):642-.
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  46. Trevor J. Saunders (1973). Plato on Killing in Anger: A Reply to Professor Woozley. Philosophical Quarterly 23 (93):350-356.
    In response to woozley's paper in "philosophical quarterly" 22 (1972), 303-17, This article argues: (a) that plato's penology in the laws is radically 'reformative'. (b) that his overriding concern is not with blame or guilt or moral responsibility, But with an exact diagnosis and then 'cure' of the criminal's 'unjust' state of mind. (c) that he uses 'hekousios' and 'akousios' in effect in the sense 'prompted by injustice in the soul of the agent' and 'not thus prompted' respectively. (d) that (...)
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  47. Andrea Scarantino & Paul Grifftiths (2011). Don't Give Up on Basic Emotions. Emotion Review 3 (4):444-454.
    We argue that there are three coherent, nontrivial notions of basic-ness: conceptual basic-ness, biological basic-ness, and psychological basic-ness. There is considerable evidence for conceptually basic emotion categories (e.g., “anger,” “fear”). These categories do not designate biologically basic emotions, but some forms of anger, fear, and so on that are biologically basic in a sense we will specify. Finally, two notions of psychological basic-ness are distinguished, and the evidence for them is evaluated. The framework we offer acknowledges the force of some (...)
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  48. Nancy Sherman (2007). Virtue and a Warrior's Anger. In Rebecca L. Walker & P. J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Working Virtue: Virtue Ethics and Contemporary Moral Problems. Oxford University Press.
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  49. Rowland Stout (2010). Seeing the Anger in Someone's Face. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):29-43.
    Starting from the assumption that one can literally perceive someone's anger in their face, I argue that this would not be possible if what is perceived is a static facial signature of their anger. There is a product–process distinction in talk of facial expression, and I argue that one can see anger in someone's facial expression only if this is understood to be a process rather than a product.
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  50. Lucas A. Swaine (1996). Blameless, Constructive, and Political Anger. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 26 (3):257–274.
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