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  1. B. Baars (1992). Introduction: The Evidence for Anosognosia. Consciousness and Cognition 1 (2):148-151.
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  2. E. Bisiach & G. Geminiani (1991). Anosognosia Related to Hemiplegia and Hemianopia. In George P. Prigatano & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficits After Brain Injury. Oxford University Press.
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  3. Glenn Carruthers (2008). Types of Body Representation and the Sense of Embodiment. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (1302):1316.
    The sense of embodiment is vital for self recognition. An examination of anosognosia for hemiplegia—the inability to recognise that one is paralysed down one side of one’s body—suggests the existence of ‘online’ and ‘offline’ representations of the body. Online representations of the body are representations of the body as it is currently, are newly constructed moment by moment and are directly “plugged into” current perception of the body. In contrast, offline representations of the body are representations of what the body (...)
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  4. Linda Clare (2002). Developing Awareness About Awareness in Early-Stage Dementia: The Role of Psychosocial Factors. Dementia 1 (3):295-312.
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  5. D. Ashley Cohen, Differences in Awareness of Neuropsychological Deficits Among Three Patient Populations.
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  6. Martin Davies, Anne Aimola Davies & Max Coltheart (2005). Anosognosia and the Two-Factor Theory of Delusions. Mind and Language 20 (2):241-57.
    Anosognosia is literally ‘unawareness of or failure to acknowledge one’s hemi- plegia or other disability’ (OED). Etymology would suggest the meaning ‘lack of knowledge of disease’ so that anosognosia would include any denial of impairment, such as denial of blindness (Anton’s syndrome). But Babinski, who introduced the term in 1914, applied it only to patients with hemiplegia who fail to acknowledge their paralysis. Most commonly, this is failure to acknowledge paralysis of the left side of the body following damage to (...)
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  7. Diane Dirette (2002). The Development of Awareness and the Use of Compensatory Strategies for Cognitive Deficits. Brain Injury 16 (10):861-871.
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  8. J. M. Fleming & T. Ownsworth (2006). A Review of Awareness Interventions in Brain Injury Rehabilitation. [REVIEW] Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):474-500.
  9. David Galin (1992). Theoretical Reflections on Awareness, Monitoring, and Self in Relation on Anosognosia. Consciousness and Cognition 1 (2):152-62.
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  10. Shelley Marie Gremley, Self-Awareness and Memory Deficits in Sub-Acute Traumatic Brain Injury.
  11. Peter W. Halligan (2006). Awareness and Knowing: Implications for Rehabilitation. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):456-473.
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  12. Tessa Hart, John Whyte, Junghoon Kim & Monica Vaccaro (2005). Executive Function and Self-Awareness of "Real-World" Behavior and Attention Deficits Following Traumatic Brain Injury. Journal of Head Trauma Rehabilitation. Special Issue 20 (4):333-347.
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  13. K. M. Hellman (1991). Anosognosia: Possible Neuropsychological Mechanisms. In G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues. Oxford University Press. 53--62.
  14. Bradley J. Hufford (2000). Self-Awareness of Neuropsychological Deficits in Children and Adolescents with Epilepsy. Dissertation, Purdue University
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  15. M. Jehkonen, J. Ahonen, P. Dastidar & J. Vilkki (2000). Unawareness of Deficits After Right Hemisphere Stroke: Double-Dissociations of Anosognosias. Acta Neurologica Scandinavica 102:378-384.
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  16. Paul M. Jenkinson, Nicola M. J. Edelstyn, Justine L. Drakeford & Simon J. Ellis (2009). Reality Monitoring in Anosognosia for Hemiplegia. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):458-470.
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  17. Hans-Otto Karnath, Bernhard Baier & Thomas Nägele (2005). Awareness of the Functioning of One's Own Limbs Mediated by the Insular Cortex? Journal of Neuroscience 25 (31):7134-7138.
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  18. John F. Kihlstrom & Betsy A. Tobias (1991). Anosognosia, Consciousness, and the Self. In G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues. Oxford University Press. 198--222.
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  19. Timothy Lane & Caleb Liang (2008). Higher-Order Thought and the Problem of Radical Confabulation. Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):69-98.
    Currently, one of the most influential theories of consciousness is Rosenthal’s version of higher-order-thought (HOT). We argue that the HOT theory allows for two distinct interpretations: a one-componentand a two-component view. We further argue that the two-component view is more consistent with his effort to promote HOT as an explanatory theory suitable for application to the empirical sciences.Unfortunately, the two-component view seems incapable of handling a group of counterexamples that we refer to as cases of radical confabulation. We begin by (...)
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  20. Elizabeth Leritz, Chris Loftis, Greg Crucian, William J. Friedman & Dawn Bowers (2004). Self-Awareness of Deficits in Parkinson Disease. Clinical Neuropsychologist 18 (3):352-361.
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  21. Ivana S. Marková & German E. Berrios (2006). Approaches to the Assessment of Awareness: Conceptual Issues. Neuropsychological Rehabilitation 16 (4):439-455.
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  22. Rebecca Martin-Scull & Robert Nilsen (2002). Evaluating Awareness: A Rating Scale and its Uses. International Journal of Cognitive Technology 7 (1):31-37.
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  23. S. M. McGlynn & Daniel L. Schacter (1989). Unawareness of Deficits in Neuropsychological Syndromes. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 11:143-205.
  24. John McGrath & Rebecca Allman (2000). Awareness and Unawareness of Thought Disorder. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 34 (1):35-42.
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  25. Daniel C. Mograbi, Richard G. Brown & Robin G. Morris (2009). Anosognosia in Alzheimer's Disease – The Petrified Self. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (4):989-1003.
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  26. Drakon Nikolinakos (2004). Anosognosia and the Unity of Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 119 (3):315-342.
    There are researchers in cognitive science who use clinical and experimental evidence to draw some rather skeptical conclusions about a central feature of our conscious experience, its unity. They maintain that the examination of clinical phenomena reveals that human consciousness has a much more fragmentary character than the one we normally attribute to it. In the article, these claims are questioned by examining some of the clinical studies on the deficit of anosognosia. I try to show that these studies support (...)
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  27. Constance Perry (2009). Anosognosia, Interests and Equal Moral Consideration. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (5):25-27.
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  28. George P. Prigatano & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.) (1991). Awareness of Deficits After Brain Injury. Oxford University Press.
    This volume provides, for the first time, multidisciplinary perspectives on the problem of awareness of deficits following brain injury.
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  29. G. P. Prigatono & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.) (1991). Awareness of Deficit After Brain Injury: Clinical and Theoretical Issues. Oxford University Press.
  30. Vilayanur S. Ramachandran (1995). Anosognosia in Parietal Lobe Syndrome. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):22-51.
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  31. K. P. Rankin, E. Baldwin, C. Pace-Savitsky, J. H. Kramer & B. L. Miller (2005). Self Awareness and Personality Change in Dementia. Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 76 (5):632-639.
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  32. Daniel L. Schacter (1990). Toward a Cognitive Neuropsychology of Awareness: Implicit Knowledge and Anosognosia. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology 12:155-78.
  33. A. Seiffer, Linda Clare & Rudolf Harvey (2005). The Role of Personality and Coping Style in Relation to Awareness of Current Functioning in Early-Stage Dementia. Aging and Mental Health 9 (6):535-541.
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  34. Oliver H. Turnbull, Karen Jones & Judith Reed-Screen (2002). Implicit Awareness of Deficit in Anosognosia? An Emotion-Based Account of Denial of Deficit. Comment. Neuro-Psychoanalysis 4 (1):69-86.
  35. Annalena Venneri & Michael F. Shanks (2004). Belief and Awareness: Reflections on a Case of Persistent Anosognosia. Neuropsychologia 42 (2):230-238.
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