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  1. Marilyn McCord Adams (2012). Evil as Nothing. Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):131-145.
    Anselm inherited a Platonizing approach to philosophy from Augustine and Boethius. But he characteristically reworked what he found in their texts by questioning and disputing it into something more rigorous. In this paper, I compare and contrast Anselm’s treatment of the trope ‘evil is nothing, not a being’ withBoethius’s use of it in The Consolation of Philosophy. In the first section, I expose a fallacious argument form common to them both: paradigm Fness is identical with paradigm Gness; X participates in (...)
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  2. Claude Albert (2007). Mental Language and Tradition Encounters in Medieval Philosophy : Anselm, Albert and Ockham. In John Marenbon (ed.), The Many Roots of Medieval Logic: The Aristotelian and the Non-Aristotelian Traditions: Special Offprint of Vivarium 45, 2-3 (2007). Brill.
  3. G. E. M. Anscombe (1993). Russelm or Anselm? Philosophical Quarterly 44 (173):500-504.
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  4. Anselm, Anselm on the Existence of God (Proslogion and Anselm's Reply to Gaunilo).
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  5. Anselm, Complete Philosophical and Theological Treatises of Anselm of Canterbury.
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  6. Anselm, Proslogium; Monologium; Gaunilon's on Behalf of the Fool.
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  7. Anselm (1998/2008). The Major Works. Oxford University Press.
    Although utterly convinced of the truth of Christianity, Anselm of Canterbury struggled to make sense of his religion. He considered the doctrines of faith an invitation to question, to think, and to learn; and he devoted his life to confronting and understanding the most elusive aspects of Christianity. His writings on matters such as free will, the nature of truth, and the existence of God make Anselm one of the greatest theologians and philosphers in history, and this translation provides readers (...)
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  8. Anselm (1979). St. Anselm's Proslogion with a Reply on Behalf of the Fool. University of Notre Dame Press.
  9. Anselm (1977). St. Anselm's Treatise on Free Will: The Booke of Seynt Anselme Which Treatith of Free Wylle Translated in to Englysche: A Facsimile of the Complete Text of a Recently Discovered 15th C. Manuscript. Toucan Press.
  10. Anselm (1965). St. Anselm's Proslogion. Oxford, Clarendon Press.
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  11. Anselm (1965/1967). Truth, Freedom, and Evil. New York, Harper & Row.
    Editors' foreword.--Editors' introduction.--Bibliography (p. 79-85).--Preface, by Anselm.--Concerning truth (De veritate)--On freedom of choice (De libertate arbitrii)--The fall of Satan (De casu Diaboli).
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  12. Anselm (1964). The De Grammatico of St. Anselm: The Theory of Paronymy. University of Notre Dame Press.
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  13. Anselm (1900). Anselm of Canterbury. Edwin Mellen Press.
    v. 1. Monologion. Proslogion. Debate with Gaunilo. Meditation on human redemption.
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  14. By Anselm W. Müller (2006). The Sort of Creature You Are. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 56 (224):442–446.
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  15. Saint Anselm (2009). Proslogion. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  16. Anselm & Gaunilo (2009). The Ontological Argument. In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy of Religion: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  17. Leslie Armour (1986). Newman, Anselm and Proof of the Existence of God. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 19 (1/2):87 - 93.
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  18. E. J. Ashworth (1978). The Tradition of Medieval Logic and Speculative Grammar From Anselm to the End of the Seventeenth Century: A Bibliography From 1836 Onwards. Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
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  19. Allan Bäck (1983). Anselm on Perfect Islands. Franciscan Studies 43 (1):188-204.
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  20. Allan Bäck (1981). Existential Import in Anselm's Ontological Argument. Franciscan Studies 41 (1):97-109.
  21. Forrest E. Baird (1995). A Simple Version of Anselm's Argument. Teaching Philosophy 18 (3):245-249.
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  22. Lynne Rudder Baker & Gareth Matthews (2010). Anselm's Argument Reconsidered. Review of Metaphysics 64 (1):31-54.
    Anselm’s argument for the existence of God in Proslogion 2 has a little-noticed feature: It can be properly formulated only by beings who have the ability to think of things and refer to things independently of whether or not they exist in reality. The authors explore this cognitive ability and try to make clear the role it plays in the ontological argument. Then, we offer a new version of the ontological argument, which, we argue, is sound: it is valid, has (...)
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  23. R. L. Barnette (1975). Anselm and the Fool. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 6 (4):201 - 218.
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  24. Clint I. Barrett (2011). A Careful Reading of St. Anselm's Ontological Argument. Philosophy and Theology 23 (2):217-230.
    Although philosophers have long agreed that Anselm’s PROSLOGION contains what is often called the ontological argument (but not by Anselm himself), they do not agree about just what that argument is. In this paper, I do two things: (1) I set out a careful, precise statement of the argument in the PROSLOGION, taking due account of the historical, personal, philosophical, and theological contexts of Anselm’s thought. (2) Having disembarrassed the argument of some common misunderstandings and placed it in its proper (...)
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  25. Karl Barth (1960/1985). Anselm, Fides Quaerens Intellectum: Anselm's Proof of the Existence of God in the Context of His Theological Scheme. Pickwick Press.
  26. Karl Barth (1960). Anselm: Fides Quaerens Intellectum. Richmond, Va.,John Knox Press.
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  27. William H. Baumer (1962). Anselm, Truth, and Necessary Being. Philosophy 37 (141):257 - 258.
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  28. Paschal Baumstein (2007). Anselm of Canterbury and the Beauty of Theology. By David S. Hogg and Anselm of Canterbury and His Theological Inheritance. By Giles E. M. Gasper. [REVIEW] Heythrop Journal 48 (1):122–124.
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  29. Arnold J. Benedetto (1966). "The Ontological Argument, From St, Anselm to Contemporary Philosophers," Ed. Alvin Plantinga, with an Introduction by Richard Taylor. Modern Schoolman 43 (2):189-190.
  30. Dagmar Borchers (2002). Anselm Müller, Was Taugt Die Tugend? Elemente Einer Ethik Des Guten Lebens. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (1):133-135.
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  31. Sarah Borden (2007). Brian Davies and Brian Leftow: The Cambridge Companion to Anselm. Faith and Philosophy 24 (4):479-481.
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  32. Peter Boschung (2006). From a Topical Point of View: Dialectic in Anselm of Canterbury's De Grammatico. Brill.
  33. Bob Brecher (1974). Aquinas on Anselm. Philosophical Studies 23:63-66.
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  34. Jeffrey E. Brower (2004). Anselm on Ethics. In Brian Davies & Brian Leftow (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Anselm. Cambridge University Press. 222--56.
    There is a real question about whether Anselm developed anything like a systematic ethical theory.1 Indeed, scholars have sometimes suggested that his treatment of ethical matters consists in little more than recapitulation of ethical principles implicit in Scripture or transmitted to him by Christian thinkers such as Augustine and Boethius.2 The truth of the matter, however, is quite the opposite. Although it is easy to overlook the systematic nature of Anselm’s ethical theorizing, as well as its genuine originality, his contribution (...)
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  35. Montague Brown (2010). Anselm on Freedom. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 84 (4):829-832.
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  36. Norman Brown (1967). Anselm's Discovery. By Charles Hartshorne. La Salle, Open Court Publishing Company. 1966. Pp. Xvi, 333. $6.00, Paperback $2.45. [REVIEW] Dialogue 6 (02):248-252.
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  37. Georg Brun (2014). Reconstructing Arguments: Formalization and Reflective Equilibrium. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 17:94-129.
    Traditional logical reconstruction of arguments aims at assessing the validity of ordinary language arguments. It involves several tasks: extracting argumentations from texts, breaking up complex argumentations into individual arguments, framing arguments in standard form, as well as formalizing arguments and showing their validity with the help of a logical formalism. These tasks are guided by a multitude of partly antagonistic goals, they interact in various feedback loops, and they are intertwined with the development of theories of valid inference and adequate (...)
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  38. Keith Burgess-Jackson (1994). Anselm, Gaunilo, and Lost Island. Philosophy and Theology 8 (3):243-249.
    The received view is that Gaunilo’s attempted refutation of Anselm’s ontological argument fails. But those who believe this do not agree as to why it fails. The aim of this essay is to show that whether the attempted refutation succeeds depends crucially on how one formulates the so-called greatmaking principle on which Anselm’s argument rests . This principle has largely been ignored by contemporary philosophers, who have chosen to focus on other aspects of the argument. I sketch two analyses of (...)
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  39. Richard Campbell (1980). On Preunderstanding St. Anselm. New Scholasticism 54 (2):189-193.
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  40. Richard James Campbell (1976). From Belief to Understanding: A Study of Anselm's Proslogion Argument on the Existence of God. Faculty of Arts, Australian National University.
  41. Phillip Cary (2007). Understanding the Medieval Meditative Ascent: Augustine, Anselm, Boethius & Dante, Robert McMahon. Augustinian Studies 38 (1):310-313.
  42. David Černý & Elisa Ferretti (2011). Gödelův důkaz Boží existence. Studia Neoaristotelica 8 (2):211-248.
    Dissertatio proposita circa “argumentum ontologicum” pro existentia Dei, quem K. Goedel construxit, versatur. In prima parte structuram logicam dicti argumenti exponimus, singulos gradus argumenti explicamus, “collapsumque modalitatum”, quo argumentum invalidari invenitur, examinamus. Sequenti parte recentiores quasdam confectiones argumenti pertractamus; et scil. praecipue formam eius, quae super conceptum mathematicum multitudinis seu “complexus elementorum terminatorum” fundatur, et formam “algebraicam”, quarum affinitates quasdam notabiles prae oculos ponimus. Ultima parte disceptationes, quae circa huiusce argumenti validitatem ac momentum respectu modernae theisticae philosophiae agebantur, describimus. Loco (...)
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  43. Timothy Chambers (2000). On Behalf of the Devil: A Parody of Anselm Revisited. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 100 (1):93–113.
    This paper treats a question which first arose in these Proceedings: Can Anselm's ontological argument be inverted so as to yield parallel proofs for the existence (or non-existence) of a least (or worst) conceivable being? Such 'devil parodies' strike some commentators as innocuous curiosities, or redundant challenges which are no more troubling than other parodies found in the literature (e.g., Gaunilo's Island). I take issue with both of these allegations; devil parodies, I argue, have the potential to pose substantive, and (...)
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  44. Patricia Crawford (1966). Existence, Predication, and Anselm. The Monist 50 (1):109-124.
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  45. Sylvia Fleming Crocker (1972). The Ontological Significance of Anselm's "Proslogion". Modern Schoolman 50 (1):33-56.
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  46. Andrew Cummings (2006). Hegel and Anselm on Divine Mystery. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 80 (4):521-541.
    This article explores the relationship between religious and philosophical thought, taking the kindred approaches of Anselm and Hegel as illustrations of one particular approach to the issue. It is argued that both thinkers employ a “logic of unity” which tends to subordinate the religious to the philosophical. The most important result of this approach, for the purposes of this paper, is the blurring of the distinction between the human and the divine. The logic of unity, whichultimately implies the “unity” of (...)
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  47. Brian Davies & Brian Leftow (eds.) (2004). The Cambridge Companion to Anselm. Cambridge University Press.
    Anselm of Canterbury (1033-1109), Benedictine monk and the second Norman archbishop of Canterbury, is regarded as one of the most important philosophers and theologians of the Middle Ages. The essays in this volume explore all of his major ideas both philosophical and theological, including his teachings on faith and reason, God's existence and nature, logic, freedom, truth, ethics, and key Christian doctrines. There is also discussion of his life, the sources of his thought, and his influence on other thinkers. New (...)
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  48. Stephen T. Davis (1984). Loptson on Anselm and Davis. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (3):245 - 249.
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  49. Stephen T. Davis (1982). Loptson on Anselm and Rowe. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (4):219 - 224.
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  50. Stephen T. Davis (1976). Anselm and Question-Begging: A Reply to William Rowe. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (4):448 - 457.
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