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  1. Liliana Acero (2009). Response: The Commodification of Women's Bodies in Trafficking for Prostitution and Egg Donation. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 2 (1):25 - 32.
  2. Judith Andre (2005). Disgust, Dignity, and a Public Intellectual. [REVIEW] Criminal Justice Ethics 24 (1):52-57.
    Martha Nussbaum’s Hiding from Humanity is eloquent and thought-provoking. I criticize some of her central arguments, particularly her construal of disgust and her exposition of shame. But I applaud the book as a whole. It is possible that richness and engagement are more important in the work of public intellectuals than is technical precision. If so, Nussbaum has fulfilled her role. It is more likely that both qualities are important, but difficult to combine. In that case, we can still thank (...)
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  3. Jonny Anomaly (forthcoming). Trust, Trade, and Moral Progress. Social Philosophy and Policy.
  4. Jonny Anomaly (2016). Review of Brennan and Jaworski, Markets Without Limits. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews:00.
  5. I. I. I. Argen (2005). A Philosopher's Fieldwork. In Elizabeth D. Boepple (ed.), Sui Generis: Essays Presented to Richard Thompson Hull on the Occasion of His Sixty-Fifth Birthday. Authorhouse
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  6. Alison Bailey (2001). Taking Responsibility for Community Violence. In Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.), FEMINISTS DOING ETHICS.
    This article examines the responses of two communities to hate crimes in their cities. In particular it explores how community understandings of responsibility shape collective responses to hate crimes. I use the case of Bridesberg, Pennsylvania to explore how anti-racist work is restricted by backward-looking conceptions of moral responsibility (e.g. being responsible). Using recent writings in feminist ethics.(1) I argue for a forward-looking notion that advocates an active view: taking responsibility for attitudes and behaviors that foster climates in which hate (...)
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  7. Christian Barry & Sanjay Reddy (2008). International Trade and Labor Standards:A Proposal for Linkage. Columbia University Press.
    In this book, Christian Barry and Sanjay G. Reddy propose ways in which the international trading system can support poor countries in promoting the well-being of their peoples.
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  8. Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland (2014). The Implications of Failing to Assist. Social Theory and Practice 40 (4):570-590.
    In this essay we argue that an agent’s failure to assist someone in need at one time can change the cost she can be morally required to take on to assist that same person at a later time. In particular, we show that the cost the agent can subsequently be required to take on to help the person in need can increase quite significantly, and can be enforced through the proportionate use of force. We explore the implications of this argument (...)
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  9. Robert Bass (2006). Undermining Indirect Duty Theories. Between the Species (6):1.
    There is a class of views about our moral relations with non-human animals that share the idea that animals do not matter directly for ethical purposes: whatever duties or obligations we have with respect to animals are indirect, connected somehow to other duties or obligations – to other human beings, for example – in which the well-being or interests of animals do not figure. Criticisms of indirect duty theories have often focused either upon denying the link that is supposed to (...)
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  10. David E. Beard (2009). “A Broader Understanding of the Ethics of Listening: Philosophy, Cultural Studies, Media Studies and the Ethical Listening Subject.”. International Journal of Listening 23 (1):7-20.
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  11. Monroe C. Beardsley (1980). Motives and Intentions. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 2:71-79.
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  12. Katja Becker, Eva-Maria Engelen & Milos Vec (eds.) (2003). Ethisierung - Ethikferne: Wie Viel Ethik Braucht Die Wissenschaft? De Gruyter.
    Wieviel Ethik braucht der Mensch, wieviel Ethik braucht die Wissenschaft? Vor dem aktuellen Hintergrund einer gewandelten Wissenschaftsgesellschaft von hoher Entwicklungsdynamik geht es darum, Anleitung zu ethischer Selbst- und Situationsreflexion zu geben. Denn die spektakulären Errungenschaften nicht nur im Bereich der Biomedizin haben jedenfalls vorübergehend Zonen von moralischer und ethischer Ratlosigkeit geschaffen. Sie eröffnen Spielräume, von denen nicht sicher ist, ob sie genutzt werden dürfen und sollten. Die Empfindlichkeit gegenüber den Nachteilen und Risiken der technisch-wissenschaftlichen Zivilisation ist jedenfalls dort, wo die (...)
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  13. Adam S. Belcher (2012). Nietzsche and Morality. Dissertation, Goldsmiths
    This dissertation seeks to investigate what Nietzsche sees a being the origin of morality. The various systems of morality and ethics that make up specific religious practises and different ideologies are all derived from a similar system of cruelty and seemingly arbitrary ritualizations of behaviours.
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  14. Eran Belo & Tomislava Savcheva (2011). Value of Human Life: Different Cultures, Different Values? Journal of Multidisciplinary Research 3 (3):143-146.
    Influenced by the story of Gilad Shalit and September 11th victims, this article discusses the everlasting argument of the value of human life in different cultures and from different perspectives. Upon examinations of basic legislations through eye-opening cases of cultural relativism, we raise questions and suggest our own opinion on the unbearable manner in which human life is perceived in the 21st Century.
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  15. Donato Bergandi (2013). Epilogue: The Epistemic and Practical Circle in an Evolutionary, Ecologically Sustainable Society. In The Structural Links between Ecology, Evolution and Ethics The Virtuous Epistemic Circle. Springer 151-158.
    Abstract In a context of human demographic, technological and economic pressure on natural systems, we face some demanding challenges. We must decide 1) whether to “preserve” nature for its own sake or to “conserve” nature because nature is essentially a reservoir of goods that are functional to humanity’s wellbeing; 2) to choose ways of life that respect the biodiversity and evolutionary potential of the planet; and, to allow all this to come to fruition, 3) to clearly define the role of (...)
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  16. Luca Bertolino (ed.) (2016). Etiche applicate / Applied Ethics. Edizioni ETS.
    Monographic issue of "Teoria" (Vol. 36, No. 2) devoted to the so-called "applied ethics". It offers an introduction to the main studies, while providing precise theoretical proposals about them, thanks to the contributions of valid specialists.
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  17. Luca Bertolino (2016). Premessa / Premise. Teoria 36 (2):5-9.
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  18. Luca Bertolino (2016). Questioni di etica applicata per le pratiche filosofiche. Teoria 36 (2):89-104.
    The essay investigates the philosophical practice, firstly focusing on its method and relationship with applied ethics. Afterwards, it explores some applied ethics issues regarding philosophical practice like the therapeutic issue, the risk of philosophical illnesses, the interaction between intellect and will as well as the healthy human understanding. In this way, it aims to outline some paths that can be fruitfully explored by philosophical practitioners and academic researcher together.
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  19. Sarah Bigi (2012). Evaluating Argumentative Moves in Medical Consultations. Journal of Argumentation in Context 1 (1):51-65.
    The relevance of context has been acknowledged also recently as a fundamental element for the correct evaluation of argumentative moves within institutional fields of interaction. Indeed, not considering the larger culture-specific and social features of the context within which the interactions take place poses problems of interpretation of the data and comparability of results. Starting from these considerations, the paper aims at discussing a model for the description of the social context of interaction that may allow for a better interpretation (...)
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  20. Mavis Biss (2014). Empathy and Interrogation. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (2):277-288.
    Against the background of not-so-distant debate regarding “enhanced” interrogation techniques used by the United States during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, which many understand to be torture, this essay explores the moral complexities of “ordinary” interrogation practices, those that are clearly not forms of torture. Based on analysis of the written reflections of two United States interrogators on the work they did during the Iraq war, I categorize the roles played by multiple modes of empathy within interrogation and argue (...)
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  21. Lisa Bortolotti (2011). Précis of Delusions and Other Irrational Beliefs. Neuroethics 5 (1):1-4.
    Here I summarise the main arguments in Delusions and Other Irrational Beliefs [1]. The book addresses the question whether there is a rationality constraint on belief ascription and defends a doxastic account of clinical delusions.
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  22. Lisa Bortolotti (2006). Moral Rights and Human Culture. Ethical Perspectives 13 (4):603-620.
    In this paper I argue that there is no moral justification for the conviction that rights should be reserved to humans. In particular, I reject James Griffin’s view on the moral relevance of the cultural dimension of humanity. Drawing from the original notion of individual right introduced in the Middle Ages and the development of this notion in the eighteenth century, I emphasise that the practice of according rights is justified by the interest in safeguarding the powers of reason and (...)
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  23. Daniele Botti (2013). Binding Market and Mission: Pharmaceuticals for the World's Poor. Solutions 4 (1).
    The Health Impact Fund (HIF) is a project aimed at expanding access to life-saving drugs worldwide and incentivizing pharmaceutical companies to invest in research and development for neglected diseases. The HIF would invert the existing patent framework by rewarding ideas through their diffusion rather than protecting against this diffusion, by encouraging a collective rather than privatized wealth scheme. The basic idea behind the HIF is the creation of a new competitive market that centers on individuals who, under normal circumstances, exert (...)
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  24. Matthew Braddock (2013). Defusing the Demandingness Objection: Unreliable Intuitions. Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):169-191.
    Dogged resistance to demanding moral views frequently takes the form of The Demandingness Objection. Premise (1): Moral view V demands too much of us. Premise (2): If a moral view demands too much of us, then it is mistaken. Conclusion: Therefore, moral view V is mistaken. Objections of this form harass major theories in normative ethics as well as prominent moral views in applied ethics and political philosophy. The present paper does the following: (i) it clarifies and distinguishes between various (...)
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  25. Matthew Braddock (2009). Evolutionary Psychology's Moral Implications. Biology and Philosophy 24 (4):531-540.
    In this paper, I critically summarize John Cartwrtight’s Evolution and Human Behavior and evaluate what he says about certain moral implications of Darwinian views of human behavior. He takes a Darwinism-doesn’t-rock-the-boat approach and argues that Darwinism, even if it is allied with evolutionary psychology, does not give us reason to be worried about the alterability of our behavior, nor does it give us reason to think that we may have to change our ordinary practices and views concerning free-will and moral (...)
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  26. Eric Brandstedt (2014). An Interview with Professor Simon Caney. de Ethica 1 (1):71-84.
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  27. D. Bromwich (2015). Understanding, Interests and Informed Consent: A Reply to Sreenivasan. Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (4):327-331.
    It is widely agreed that the view of informed consent found in the regulations and guidelines struggles to keep pace with the ever-advancing enterprise of human subjects research. Over the last 10 years, there have been serious attempts to rethink informed consent so that it conforms to our considered judgments about cases where we are confident valid consent has been given. These arguments are influenced by an argument from Gopal Sreenivasan, which apparently shows that a potential participant's consent to research (...)
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  28. Matthew J. Brown (2007). Picky Eating is a Moral Failing. In Dave Monroe & Fritz Allhoff (eds.), Food & Philosophy: Eat, Think, and Be Merry. Blackwell
    Common wisdom includes expressions such as “there is no accounting for taste'’ that express a widely-accepted subjectivism about taste. We commonly say things like “I can’t stand anything with onions in it'’ or “Oh, I’d never eat sushi,'’ and we accept such from our friends and associates. It is the position of this essay that much of this language is actually quite unacceptable. Without appealing to complete objectivism about taste, I will argue that there are good reasons to think that (...)
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  29. Godehard Brüntrup (1992). Ist der messtheoretische Ansatz hinreichend bestimmt? Ethik Und Sozialwissenschaften 3 (4):447-450.
    A critique of a reductionist theory of intentionality by Ansgar Beckermann.
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  30. William Bülow (2014). The Harms Beyond Imprisonment: Do We Have Special Moral Obligations Towards the Families and Children of Prisoners? Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (4):775-789.
    This paper discusses whether the collateral harm of imprisonment to the close family members and children of prison inmates may give rise to special moral obligations towards them. Several collateral harms, including decreased psychological wellbeing, financial costs, loss of economic opportunities, and intrusion and control over their private lives, are identified. Two competing perspectives in moral philosophy are then applied in order to assess whether the harms are permissible. The first is consequentialist and the second is deontological. It is argued (...)
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  31. Sarah Byers (2012). "The Psychology of Compassion: A Reading of City of God 9.5". In James Wetzel (ed.), Augustine's City of God (Cambridge Critical Guides). Cambridge University Press 130-148.
    Writing to the young emperor Nero, Seneca elaborates a sophisticated distinction between compassion and mercy for use in forensic contexts, agreeing with earlier Stoics that compassion is a vice, but adding that there is a virtue called mercy or 'clemency.' This Stoic repudiation of compassion has won the attention of Nussbaum, who argues that it was motivated by a respect for persons as dignified agents, and was of a piece with the Stoics' cosmopolitanism. This chapter engages Nussbaum's presentation of the (...)
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  32. Leonardo Caffo (ed.) (2011). Azioni & Natura Umana, Un Breve Viaggio Tra Complessità E Filosofia Della Vita. Fara Editore.
    Di cosa siamo veramente responsabili? Qual è il margine di libertà delle nostre azioni, anche di quelle che crediamo dipendano esclusivamente dalla nostra volontà? Fino a che punto la società capitalistica globalizzata “svia” i caratteri fondamentali della nostra natura umana? Quanto c’è di innato e di culturale in questa “natura”? La violenza e la guerra sono naturali?
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  33. Lisa Cassidy (2005). 'Starving Children in Africa': Who Cares? Journal of International Women's Studies 7 (1):84-96.
    The current state of global poverty presents citizens in the Global North with a moral crisis: Do we care? In this essay, I examine two competing moral accounts of why those in the North should or should not give care (in the form of charity) to impoverished peoples in the Global South. Nineteen years ago feminist philosopher Nel Noddings wrote in Caring that “we are not obliged to care for starving children in Africa” (1986, p. 86). Noddings’s work belongs to (...)
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  34. Ruth Chang (2002). The Possibility of Parity. Ethics 112 (4):659-688.
    This paper argues for the existence of a fourth positive generic value relation that can hold between two items beyond ‘better than’, ‘worse than’, and ‘equally good’: namely ‘on a par’.
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  35. Andreas Christiansen (2016). Synthetic Biology and the Moral Significance of Artificial Life: A Reply to Douglas, Powell and Savulescu. Bioethics 30 (5):372-379.
    I discuss the moral significance of artificial life within synthetic biology via a discussion of Douglas, Powell and Savulescu's paper 'Is the creation of artificial life morally significant’. I argue that the definitions of 'artificial life’ and of 'moral significance’ are too narrow. Douglas, Powell and Savulescu's definition of artificial life does not capture all core projects of synthetic biology or the ethical concerns that have been voiced, and their definition of moral significance fails to take into account the possibility (...)
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  36. David Coady & Richard Corry (2013). The Climate Change Debate: An Epistemic and Ethical Enquiry. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Two kinds of philosophical questions are raised by the current public debate about climate change; epistemic questions (Whom should I believe? Is climate science a genuine science?), and ethical questions (Who should bear the burden? Must I sacrifice if others do not?). Although the former have been central to this debate, professional philosophers have dealt almost exclusively with the latter. This book is the first to address both the epistemic and ethical questions raised by the climate change debate and examine (...)
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  37. Mark Coeckelbergh (2016). Responsibility and the Moral Phenomenology of Using Self-Driving Cars. Applied Artificial Intelligence 30 (8):748-757.
    This paper explores how the phenomenology of using self-driving cars influences conditions for exercising and ascribing responsibility. First, a working account of responsibility is presented, which identifies two classic Aristotelian conditions for responsibility and adds a relational one, and which makes a distinction between responsibility for (what one does) and responsibility to (others). Then, this account is applied to a phenomenological analysis of what happens when we use a self-driving car and participate in traffic. It is argued that self-driving cars (...)
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  38. Mark Coeckelbergh & Jessica Mesman (2007). With Hope and Imagination: Imaginative Moral Decision-Making in Neonatal Intensive Care Units. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):3-21.
    Although the role of imagination in moral reasoning is often neglected, recent literature, mostly of pragmatist signature, points to imagination as one of its central elements. In this article we develop some of their arguments by looking at the moral role of imagination in practice, in particular the practice of neonatal intensive care. Drawing on empirical research, we analyze a decision-making process in various stages: delivery, staff meeting, and reflection afterwards. We show how imagination aids medical practitioners demarcating moral categories, (...)
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  39. Nicolas Cornell (2015). A Third Theory of Paternalism. Michigan Law Review 113:1295-1336.
  40. John Danaher (forthcoming). Robotic Rape and Robotic Child Sexual Abuse: Should They Be Criminalised? Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-25.
    Soon there will be sex robots. The creation of such devices raises a host of social, legal and ethical questions. In this article, I focus in on one of them. What if these sex robots are deliberately designed and used to replicate acts of rape and child sexual abuse? Should the creation and use of such robots be criminalised, even if no person is harmed by the acts performed? I offer an argument for thinking that they should be. The argument (...)
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  41. Giovanni De Grandis (2013). A Starting Point for a Practical and Methodological Discussion. [REVIEW] (Ibidem) le Letture di Planum. The Journal of Urbanism (1):34-47.
    The paper is a critical discussion of Susan Fainstein's "The Just City". The review points out some weaknesses of Fainstein's three-dimensional account of justice, because the dimension of equity dominates over those of democracy and diversity. Moreover, the reasons for focusing on the just city instead of the good city are questioned. The review discusses two further important issues emerging from Fainstein's book: 1) the ethos of planners and, more generally, the role of experts in policy making; 2) the use (...)
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  42. Geert Demuijnck (2009). Disability and Discrimination in Access to Employment: What the People Think About Positive Discrimination and Integration. In P. Alonso, D. Cantarero, J. Nunez & M. Saez (eds.), Ensayos sobre Economia, Discapacidad y Empleo. Essays on Economics, Disability and Employment. Delta Publicaciones Universitarias
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  43. Geert Demuijnck (2009). From an Implicit Christian Corporate Culture to a Structured Conception of Social Responsibility in a Retail Company. A Case-Study in Hermeneutic Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 84 (3):387-404.
    This article presents a qualitative research about the way in which business leaders of a retail company gradually clarify the ethical responsibilities of their company – in an ongoing discussion of particular cases. It is based on 12 years of experience as an external member of the ethics committee. The aim of the article is not so much as to evaluate the different single decisions that were made and implemented to make the company meet high ethical standards, but rather to (...)
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  44. Geert Demuijnck (2008). Is P2P Downloading of MP3 Files an Objectionable Form of Free-Riding? In A. Gosseries & A. Strowel (eds.), Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Basingstoke & N.Y.: Palgrave McMillan
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  45. Geert Demuijnck (2008). Citizenship and Democratic Values in a Globalized Economy. In Eoin Cassidy (ed.), Community, Constitution, Ethos. Democratic Values and Citizenship facing Globalisation. Otior Press
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  46. Geert Demuijnck & Dominique Greiner (2008). Ce Que les Valides Doivent aux Handicapés. la Revue Nouvelle:28-31.
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  47. Lara Denis (2000). Kant's Conception of Duties Regarding Animals: Reconstruction and Reconsideration. History of Philosophy Quarterly 17 (4):405-23.
    In Kant’s moral theory, we do not have duties to animals, though we have duties with regard to them. I reconstruct Kant’s arguments for several types of duties with regard to animals and show that Kant’s theory imposes far more robust requirements on our treatment of animals than one would expect. Kant’s duties regarding animals are perfect and imperfect; they are primarily but not exclusively duties to oneself; and they condemn not merely cruelty to animals for its own sake, but (...)
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  48. Peggy DesAutels & JoAnne Waugh (eds.) (2001). FEMINISTS DOING ETHICS. Rowman & Littlefield Pub Inc.
    As the initial book in the Feminist Constructions series, Feminists Doing Ethics broaches the ideas of critiquing social practice and developing an ethics of ...
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  49. Tyler Doggett (2013). Saving the Few. Noûs 47 (2):302-315.
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  50. Tyler Doggett (2011). Recent Work on the Ethics of Self-Defense. Philosophy Compass 6 (4):220-233.
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