Bookmark and Share

Applied Ethics

Edited by Ezio Di Nucci (University of Copenhagen)
Most recently added entries found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 663
  1. added 2016-05-27
    Henrike Luhmann & Ludwig Theuvsen (forthcoming). Corporate Social Responsibility in Agribusiness: Literature Review and Future Research Directions. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-24.
    Changes in social framework conditions, accelerated by globalization or political inventions, have created new societal demands and requirements on companies. The concept of corporate social responsibility is often considered a potential tool for meeting societal demands and criticism as a company voluntarily takes responsibility for society. The spotlight of public attention has only recently come to focus on agribusiness-related aspects of CSR. It is therefore the objective of this paper to provide an overview and a critical examination of the current (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. added 2016-05-27
    Shahzad Uddin, Javed Siddiqui & Muhammad Azizul Islam (forthcoming). Corporate Social Responsibility Disclosures, Traditionalism and Politics: A Story From a Traditional Setting. Journal of Business Ethics.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. added 2016-05-27
    Dicky Sofjan (ed.) (2016). Religion, Public Policy and Social Transformation in Southeast Asia: Managing Religious Diversity Vol. 1. Globethics.Net.
    This book series deals with religion and its interface with the state and society in Southeast Asia. It examines the multidimensional facets of politics, public policies and social change in relation to contemporary forms of religions, religious communities, thinking, praxis and ethos. All articles in this Book Series were a direct result of a policy-relevant research collaboration conducted by investigators from the participating countries from 2013–2016. The issues under examination in this Series include: state management of diversity, multicultural policies, religious (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. added 2016-05-26
    Badru Ronald Olufemi (2016). Transnational Justice and the Global Taxation Policy Proposal: An Institutionalist Address of the Feasibility Question. Dialogue and Universalism (Issue No: 1):155-172.
    This work attempts to address some basic feasibility concerns in the global taxation policy proposal. In recent years, moral-political philosophizing has extensively advan-ced the idea of transnational justice through volumes of scholarly literature. In moving the discussions beyond an ideational level and projecting it onto a practical realm, mo-ral-political thinkers have proposed a global taxation policy, the proceeds of the imple-mentation of which are meant to cater for the global poor. This proposal is morally laudable, given that it would substantially (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. added 2016-05-26
    Kathy Behrendt (2016). Learning to Be Dead: The Narrative Problem of Mortality. In Michael Cholbi (ed.), Immortality and the Philosophy of Death. 157-172.
    The problem of mortality treats death as posing a paradox for the narrative view of the self. This view, on some interpretations, needs death in order to complete a life in a manner analogous to the ending of a story. But death is inaccessible to the subject herself, and so the analogy fails. Our inability to grasp the event of our own death is thought to undermine the possibility of achieving a meaningful, coherent, or complete life on narrativist terms. Narrativist (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. added 2016-05-25
    Ethan L. Hutt (forthcoming). Surveying the Nation: Longitudinal Surveys and the Construction of National Solutions to Educational Inequity. Ethics and Education:1-19.
    This paper examines the origins and influences of the introduction of longitudinal student data-sets as a way of gaining insight into the operation of American schools and as a tool for policy-makers. The paper argues that the creation of this new form of data in the 1960s and 1970s represented a relatively new way of thinking about American schools that allowed policy-makers to view the American education system as relatively uniform and the goal of policy to optimize its function. The (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. added 2016-05-25
    Shannon Lydia Spruit, Ibo Poel & Neelke Doorn (forthcoming). Informed Consent in Asymmetrical Relationships: An Investigation Into Relational Factors That Influence Room for Reflection. NanoEthics:1-16.
    In recent years, informed consent has been suggested as a way to deal with risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. We argue that while we can learn from experiences with informed consent in treatment and research contexts, we should be aware that informed consent traditionally pertains to certain features of the relationships between doctors and patients and researchers and research participants, rather than those between producers and consumers and employers and employees, which are more prominent in the case of engineered nanomaterials. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. added 2016-05-25
    Carlos H. Barrios (2016). The Good Example: Potential of Clinical Research to Expand Quality Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):22-23.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. added 2016-05-25
    Keisha Shantel Ray (2016). Not Just “Study Drugs” for the Rich: Stimulants as Moral Tools for Creating Opportunities for Socially Disadvantaged Students. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):29-38.
    An argument in the cognitive enhancement literature is that using stimulants in populations of healthy but socially disadvantaged individuals mistakenly attributes pathology to nonpathological individuals who experience social inequalities. As the argument goes, using stimulants as cognitive-enhancing drugs to solve the social problem of poorly educated students in inadequate schools misattributes the problem as an individual medical problem, when it is really a collective sociopolitical problem. I challenge this argument on the grounds that not all types of enhancement have to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. added 2016-05-25
    Andrea Lavazza (2016). A Rawlsian Version of the Opportunity Maintenance Thesis. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):50-52.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. added 2016-05-25
    Bridget Pratt, Joseph Ali & Adnan A. Hyder (2016). If Research Is a Pillar of Health System Development, Why Only Focus on Clinical Trials? American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):14-17.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. added 2016-05-25
    Sebastian Sattler & Ilina Singh (2016). Cognitive Enhancement in Healthy Children Will Not Close the Achievement Gap in Education. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):39-41.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. added 2016-05-25
    Silvia Camporesi (2016). Review of Catherine Mills, Futures of Reproduction: Bioethics and Biopolitics1. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):1-3.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. added 2016-05-25
    Kwaku Poku Asante, Caroline Jones, Sodiomon Bienvenu Sirima & Sassy Molyneux (2016). Clinical Trials Cannot Substitute for Health System Strengthening Initiatives or Specifically Designed Health Policy and Systems Research. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):24-26.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. added 2016-05-25
    Denise M. Dudzinski (2016). Review of C. Bruce, M. Majumder, T. Bibler, L. McCullough, J. Blumenthal-Barby, N. Allen, A. Peña, and A. McGuire, Developing and Sustaining a Clinical Ethics Consultation Service: A Practical Guide1. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):4-5.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. added 2016-05-25
    Thomas Finegan (2016). Intermediate Moral Respect and Proportionality Reasoning. Bioethics 30 (5):n/a-n/a.
    In a recent article in this journal Jonathan Pugh critiques the idea of intermediate ‘moral respect’ which some say is owed to embryos. This concept is inherent within the ‘principle of proportionality’, the principle that destructive research on embryos is permissable only if the research serves an important purpose. Pugh poses two specific questions to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect. This article argues that while the questions posed by Pugh are certainly pertinent to the debate, the hypothetical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. added 2016-05-25
    Ranita Ray & Georgiann Davis (2016). Pharmacists Can't Administer Opportunity: The Role of Neuroenhancers in Educational Inequalities. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):41-43.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. added 2016-05-25
    Aidan Kestigian & Alex John London (2016). Adversaries at the Bedside: Advance Care Plans and Future Welfare. Bioethics 30 (5):n/a-n/a.
    Advance care planning refers to the process of determining how one wants to be cared for in the event that one is no longer competent to make one's own medical decisions. Some have argued that advance care plans often fail to be normatively binding on caretakers because those plans do not reflect the interests of patients once they enter an incompetent state. In this article, we argue that when the core medical ethical principles of respect for patient autonomy, honest and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. added 2016-05-25
    Avram Denburg, Carlos Rodriguez-Galindo & Steven Joffe (2016). Clinical Trials Infrastructure as a Quality Improvement Intervention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):3-11.
    Mounting evidence suggests that participation in clinical trials confers neither advantage nor disadvantage on those enrolled. Narrow focus on the question of a “trial effect,” however, distracts from a broader mechanism by which patients may benefit from ongoing clinical research. We hypothesize that the existence of clinical trials infrastructure—the organizational culture, systems, and expertise that develop as a product of sustained participation in cooperative clinical trials research—may function as a quality improvement lever, improving the quality of care and outcomes of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. added 2016-05-25
    David Wendler (2016). The Potential for Infrastructure Benefits and the Responsiveness Requirement. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):1-2.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. added 2016-05-25
    Wim Pinxten, Raffaella Ravinetto & Anne Buvé (2016). Never Look a Gift Horse in the Mouth? Four Reasons Not to Blur the Line Between Research and Care in Low- and Middle-Income Countries. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):17-19.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. added 2016-05-25
    Stuart Rennie (2016). The Infrastructure Effect: Scientific Conjecture or Wishful Thinking? American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):12-13.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. added 2016-05-25
    Jody L. Graham (2016). Hindering Abilities or Maintaining Opportunities? Using Medical Resources for Social Deficits. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):44-45.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. added 2016-05-25
    Bridget Gabrielle Haire (2016). “Reasonable Availability” Criterion Remains Salient. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):19-21.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. added 2016-05-25
    Vilius Dranseika, Eugenijus Gefenas & Marcin Waligora (2016). Broadening the “Infrastructure Effect”: Lessons From the Early Development of Research Ethics in Eastern Europe. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):26-28.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. added 2016-05-25
    Alexandre Erler (2016). Using Stimulants to Tackle Social Disadvantages: Interesting in Theory, Problematic in Practice. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):48-50.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. added 2016-05-25
    Christine Stevenson (2016). Self-Pathologizing and the Perception of Necessity: Two Major Risks of Providing Stimulants to Educationally Underprivileged Students. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):54-56.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. added 2016-05-25
    Keisha Shantel Ray (2016). Response to Open Peer Commentaries on “Not Just ‘Study Drugs’ for The Rich: Stimulants as Moral Tools for Creating Opportunities for Socially Disadvantaged Students”. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):8-10.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. added 2016-05-25
    Fred B. Ketchum & Dimitris Repantis (2016). Securing Opportunities for the Disadvantaged, or Medicalization Through the Back Door? American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):46-48.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. added 2016-05-25
    Walter Glannon (2016). Review of Joseph J. Fins, Rights Come to Mind: Brain Injury, Ethics, and the Struggle for Consciousness. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):6-7.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. added 2016-05-25
    Kacey Brooke Warren (2016). Promoting Stimulants to Increase Educational Equality: Some Concerns. American Journal of Bioethics 16 (6):52-54.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. added 2016-05-24
    Anthony Skelton (forthcoming). Introduction to the Symposium on Peter Singer, The Most Good You Can Do. Journal of Global Ethics 12 (2).
    This is the introduction to the Journal of Global Ethics symposium on Peter Singer's The Most Good You Can Do: How Effective Altruism is Changing Ideas About Living Ethically. It summarizes the main features of effective altruism in the context of Singer's work on the moral demands of global poverty and some recent criticisms of effective altruism. The symposium contains contributions by Anthony Skelton, Violetta Igneski, Tracy Isaacs and Peter Singer.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. added 2016-05-24
    Thomas Finegan (2016). Intermediate Moral Respect and Proportionality Reasoning. Bioethics 30 (5):n/a-n/a.
    In a recent article in this journal Jonathan Pugh critiques the idea of intermediate ‘moral respect’ which some say is owed to embryos. This concept is inherent within the ‘principle of proportionality’, the principle that destructive research on embryos is permissable only if the research serves an important purpose. Pugh poses two specific questions to proponents of the idea of intermediate moral respect. This article argues that while the questions posed by Pugh are certainly pertinent to the debate, the hypothetical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. added 2016-05-24
    Aidan Kestigian & Alex John London (2016). Adversaries at the Bedside: Advance Care Plans and Future Welfare. Bioethics 30 (5).
    Advance care planning refers to the process of determining how one wants to be cared for in the event that one is no longer competent to make one's own medical decisions. Some have argued that advance care plans often fail to be normatively binding on caretakers because those plans do not reflect the interests of patients once they enter an incompetent state. In this article, we argue that when the core medical ethical principles of respect for patient autonomy, honest and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. added 2016-05-24
    Jesse Tomalty (2016). Remedial Responsibility for Severe Poverty: Justice or Humanity? Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2).
    Remedial responsibility is the prospective responsibility to assist those in great need. With tens of millions of people worldwide suffering from severe poverty, questions about the attribution of remedial responsibility and the nature of the relevant duties of assistance are among the most pressing of our time. This article concerns the question of whether remedial responsibility for severe poverty is a matter of justice or of humanity. I discuss three kinds of situation in which an agent owes remedial responsibility to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. added 2016-05-24
    Douglas Sipp (2016). Cell Churches and Stem Cell Marketing in South Korea and the United States. Developing World Bioethics 16 (1):n/a-n/a.
    The commercial provision of putative stem cell-based medical interventions in the absence of conclusive evidence of safety and efficacy has formed the basis of an unregulated industry for more than a decade. Many clinics offering such supposed stem cell treatments include statements about the ‘ethical’ nature of somatic stem cells, in specific contrast to human embryonic stem cells, which have been the subject of intensive political, legal, and religious controversy since their first derivation in 1998. Christian groups—both Roman Catholic and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. added 2016-05-24
    Chris Kaposy, Fern Brunger, Victor Maddalena & Richard Singleton (2016). The Use of Ethics Decision‐Making Frameworks by Canadian Ethics Consultants: A Qualitative Study. Bioethics 30 (5):n/a-n/a.
    In this study, Canadian healthcare ethics consultants describe their use of ethics decision-making frameworks. Our research finds that ethics consultants in Canada use multi-purpose ethics decision-making frameworks, as well as targeted frameworks that focus on reaching an ethical resolution to a particular healthcare issue, such as adverse event reporting, or difficult triage scenarios. Several interviewees mention the influence that the accreditation process in Canadian healthcare organizations has on the adoption and use of such frameworks. Some of the ethics consultants we (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. added 2016-05-23
    John Danaher (forthcoming). Should We Use Commitment Contracts to Regulate Student Use of Cognitive Enhancing Drugs? Bioethics.
    Are universities justified in trying to regulate student use of cognitive enhancing drugs? In this paper I argue that they can be, but that the most appropriate kind of regulatory intervention is likely to be voluntary in nature. To be precise, I argue that universities could justifiably adopt a commitment contract system of regulation wherein students are encouraged to voluntarily commit to not using cognitive enhancing drugs (or to using them in a specific way). If they are found to breach (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. added 2016-05-22
    Richard Davies (forthcoming). Youth Work and Ethics: Why the ‘Professional Turn’ Won’T Do. Ethics and Education:1-11.
    Youth work is deemed to require a distinctive commitment to ethical behaviour from the adults involved. This is expressed in the requirements for the initial education of workers, in the subject benchmarks and national expectations for youth workers. A significant influence in this debate is Howard Sercombe. Sercombe seeks a substantive framework for youth work ethics. The project offers clear potential benefits alongside equally great dangers. His platform is an integration of two foundations: a particular definition of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. added 2016-05-22
    T. Fischer, K. B. Brothers, P. Erdmann & M. Langanke (2016). Clinical Decision-Making and Secondary Findings in Systems Medicine. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-12.
    BackgroundSystems medicine is the name for an assemblage of scientific strategies and practices that include bioinformatics approaches to human biology ; “big data” statistical analysis; and medical informatics tools. Whereas personalized and precision medicine involve similar analytical methods applied to genomic and medical record data, systems medicine draws on these as well as other sources of data. Given this distinction, the clinical translation of systems medicine poses a number of important ethical and epistemological challenges for researchers working to generate systems (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. added 2016-05-22
    Wike Seekles, Guy Widdershoven, Paul Robben, Gonny van Dalfsen & Bert Molewijk (2016). Evaluation of Moral Case Deliberation at the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate: A Pilot Study. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1-11.
    BackgroundMoral case deliberation as a form of clinical ethics support is usually implemented in health care institutions and educational programs. While there is no previous research on the use of clinical ethics support on the level of health care regulation, employees of regulatory bodies are regularly confronted with moral challenges. This pilot study describes and evaluates the use of MCD at the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate.The objective of this pilot study is to investigate: 1) the current way of dealing with (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. added 2016-05-21
    Karim Bschir (forthcoming). Risk, Uncertainty and Precaution in Science: The Threshold of the Toxicological Concern Approach in Food Toxicology. Science and Engineering Ethics:1-20.
    Environmental risk assessment is often affected by severe uncertainty. The frequently invoked precautionary principle helps to guide risk assessment and decision-making in the face of scientific uncertainty. In many contexts, however, uncertainties play a role not only in the application of scientific models but also in their development. Building on recent literature in the philosophy of science, this paper argues that precaution should be exercised at the stage when tools for risk assessment are developed as well as when they are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. added 2016-05-21
    Tina Rulli (2016). What Is the Value of Three‐Parent IVF? Hastings Center Report 46 (3).
    In February 2016, the Institute of Medicine released a report, commissioned by the United States Food and Drug Administration, on the ethical and social-policy implications of so-called three-parent in vitro fertilization. The IOM endorses commencement of clinical trials on three-parent IVF, subject to some initial limitations. Also called mitochondrial replacement or transfer, three-parent IVF is an intervention comprising two distinct procedures in which the genetic materials of three people—the DNA of the father and mother and the mitochondrial DNA of an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. added 2016-05-21
    Spencer Phillips Hey & Jonathan Kimmelman (2016). Do We Know Whether Researchers and Reviewers Are Estimating Risk and Benefit Accurately? Bioethics 30 (5):n/a-n/a.
    Accurate estimation of risk and benefit is integral to good clinical research planning, ethical review, and study implementation. Some commentators have argued that various actors in clinical research systems are prone to biased or arbitrary risk/benefit estimation. In this commentary, we suggest the evidence supporting such claims is very limited. Most prior work has imputed risk/benefit beliefs based on past behavior or goals, rather than directly measuring them. We describe an approach – forecast analysis – that would enable direct and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. added 2016-05-21
    Niels Lynøe, Sara NattochDag, Magnus Lindskog & Niklas Juth (2016). Heed or disregard a cancer patient’s critical blogging? An experimental study of two different framing strategies. BMC Medical Ethics 17 (1):1.
    We have examined healthcare staff attitudes of toward a blogging cancer patient who publishes critical posts about her treatment and their possible effect on patient-staff relationships and treatment decisions. We used two versions of a questionnaire containing a vignette based on a modified real case involving a 39-year-old cancer patient who complained on her blog about how she was encountered and the treatment she received. Initially she was not offered a new, and expensive treatment, which might have influenced her perception (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. added 2016-05-21
    August R. Immel (2016). The Need for an Ethical Fitness Assessment in the US Armed Forces. Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):3-17.
    ABSTRACTWhile many attempts have been made to institutionalize ethical training in the United States Armed Forces, the intended aim of each undertaking – changing the overall perception, understanding, and appreciation of ethics – is not fully achieved. Additionally – and conspicuously absent from each of the ethical initiatives of the warfighting institution – no method to evaluate and assess the ethical behavior of its members exists in the Armed Forces. Because Service members do not have a standard from (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. added 2016-05-21
    Henrik Syse & Martin L. Cook (2016). Intentions and Mindsets. Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):1-2.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. added 2016-05-21
    Greg Janzen (2016). A Critique of the Right Intention Condition as an Element of Jus Ad Bellum. Journal of Military Ethics 15 (1):36-57.
    According to just war theory, a resort to war is justified only if it satisfies the right intention condition. This article offers a critical examination of this condition, defending the thesis that, despite its venerable history as part of the just war tradition, it ought to be jettisoned. When properly understood, it turns out to be an unnecessary element of jus ad bellum, adding nothing essential to our assessments of the justice of armed conflict.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. added 2016-05-21
    Luke William Hunt (2014). The Global Ethics of Helping and Harming. Human Rights Quarterly 36 (4).
    This article addresses two issues. First, it critiques a prominent position regarding how affluent states should balance their national interest on the one hand and their duty to aid developing states on the other. Second, it suggests that absent a principled way to balance national interest with international aid, a state’s more immediate concern is to comply with its negative duty to not harm other states. To support this position, the article constructs a conception of harm that may be applied (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. added 2016-05-20
    Roland Pierik (2016). Mandatory Vaccination: An Unqualified Defence. Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2).
    The 2015 Disneyland outbreak of measles in the US unequivocally brought to light what had been brewing below the surface for a while: a slow but steady decline in vaccination rates resulting in a rising number of outbreaks. This can be traced back to an increasing public questioning of vaccines by an emerging anti-vaccination movement. This article argues that, in the face of diminishing vaccination rates, childhood vaccinations should not be seen as part of the domain of parental choice (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 663