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  1. S. N. Abbas (2013). Poetry of Islamic Revolution as a cradle of the International Islamic resistance Poetry. SOCRATES 1 (1):93-99.
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  2. Aw Ata (1988). Sexual Inequality Amongst Muslim Arabs. Journal of Dharma 13 (1):15-30.
  3. Raja Bahlul (2012). Modernity and Islamic Religious Consciousness. In Shahram Akbarzadeh (ed.), A Handbook of Political Islam. 35-50.
    A discussion of the intellectual impact which Modernity has had on Islamic religious consciousness.
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  4. Marina Paola Banchetti-Robino (2006). The Microcosm/Macrocosm Analogy in Ibn Sina and Husserl. In Anna-Teresa Tymieniecka (ed.), Islamic Philosophy and Occidental Phenomenology on the Perennial Issue of Microcosm and Macrocosm. Springer
  5. Elisa Coda (2014). Reconstructing the Text of Themistius’ Paraphrase of the De Caelo. Studia Graeco-Arabica 4:1-15.
    Themistius’ paraphrase of Aristotle’s On the Heavens, which is extant only in the Hebrew and Latin translations, announces at its beginning that the term “Heaven” has three meanings. The same tripartition features at the beginning of Simplicius’ commentary: both Themistius and Simplicius depend upon Alexander’s lost commentary. However, in the Hebrew version of Themistius’ paraphrase only two meanings are given. The Latin version seems prima facie to be sound, because there are three meanings listed; however, the second meaning of the (...)
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  6. Cristina D'Ancona (2011). Platonic and Neoplatonic Terminology for Being in Arabic Translation. Studia Graeco-Arabica 1:23-46.
    The Arabic version of the Enneads is the earliest datable text in which appears the term "anniyya", that features in Avicenna’s metaphysics and lies in the background of the Latin definition of the Causa prima as esse tantum, typical of the Liber de Causis. This paper examines some examples of the use of "to be" in the Arabic translation of the Enneads. It also discusses the description of the First Cause as ‘pure Being’ or ‘first Being’ in the Arabic Plotinus, (...)
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  7. Antonio de Diego González (2012). Una Lectura de la Sûrâ Al-Fâtiha En Swahili. Africaneando. Revista de Actualidad y Experiencias' (10):53-64.
    En 1994 el shayj Ali Muhsin Al Barwani concluyó en el exilio su traducción del Corán al swahili. La principal característica es que huía del swahili estándar formulado por los británicos, para usar el swahili clásico que se enseñaba en las madâris (escuelas coránicas) de Kenya, Tanzania y Zanzíbar. Además, esta traducción introducía elementos (léxico, símbolos, construcciones sociales) del pensamiento tradicional islámico swahili. Nuestro trabajo es un análisis hermenéutico simbólico de la primera sûrâ del Corán, al Fâtiha, para determinar los (...)
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  8. Antonio de Diego González (2012). La Shayja Nana Asma'u y Los Orígenes Del Femenismo Islamo-Africano. WebIslam.
    Este trabajo es una introducción a la vida y a la obra de una de las intelectuales musulmanas más importantes del siglo XIX, Nana Asma'u bint Fôdio. En él se analiza de forma post-colonial el contexto, la biografía y la obra de esta pensadora, y las implicaciones que tuvo para el feminismo islámico.
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  9. Daniel D. De Haan (2014). A Mereological Construal of the Primary Notions Being and Thing in Avicenna and Aquinas. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 88 (2):335-360.
    This study has two goals: first, to show that Avicenna’s account of being and thing significantly influenced Aquinas’s doctrine of the primary notions; second, to establish the value of adopting a mereological construal of these primary notions in the metaphysics of Avicenna and Aquinas. I begin with an explication of the mereological construal of the primary notions that casts these notions in terms of wholes and parts. Being and thing refer to the same entitative whole and have the same extension, (...)
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  10. Saba Fatima (2011). Who Counts as a Muslim? Identity, Multiplicity and Politics. Journal of Muslim Minority Affairs 31 (3):339-353.
    My aim in this paper is to carve out a political understanding of the Muslim identity. The Muslim identity is shaped within a religious mold. Inseparable from this religious understanding is a political one that is valuable in its own right in order to secure any sustainable possibility of participating politically as Muslims within a democratic liberal democracy, such as the United States. Here I explore not the historical or theological formation of the Muslim identity, rather a metaphysical understanding of (...)
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  11. Pirooz Fatoorchi (2014). Tusi's Three Philosophical Questions ( Appendix: Arabic Text). International Journal of Shi'i Studies 9 (2):13-14.
  12. Pirooz Fatoorchi (2008). Avicenna on the Human Self‐Consciousness. In Mehmet Mazak & Nevzat Ozkaya (eds.), International Ibn Sina Symposium Papers (vol.2). FSF Printing House
    In recent years, philosophers have shown a rapidly increasing interest in the problem of consciousness and it is arguably the central issue in current interdisciplinary discussions about the mind. Any convincing theory of consciousness has to account for the perplexing aspects of human self-consciousness. This paper deals with Ibn Sina’s view on the human self-consciousness with special reference to his well-known “Flying Man” thought experiment. In a brief comparative discussion, we will consider some of the parallels between Ibn Sina’s account (...)
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  13. Sayyed Hakkak (unknown). Secondary Types of Acquired Knowledge in Mulla Sadra's View. Kheradnameh Sadra Quarterly 36.
    Knowledge means the presence of the known before the knower, and it is either presential or acquired. Presential knowledge means the presence of the known's existence before the knower, such as man's knowledge of himself.Acquired knowledge means the presence of the known form before the knower, such as man's knowledge of external objects. Here, what is directly present before the knower is a concept of the known, and what is known by essence is that very concept, and the external object (...)
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  14. Ali Hasan (2013). Al-Ghazali and Ibn Rush (Averroes) on Creation and the Divine Attributes. In Jeanine Diller & Asa Kasher (eds.), Models of God and Alternative Ultimate Realities. Springer 141-156.
    Al-Ghazali (1058-1111) was concerned that early Islamic philosophers were leaning too heavily and uncritically on Aristotelian and Neoplatonic ideas in developing their models of God and His relation to the world. He argued that their views were not only irreligious, but philosophically problematic, and he defended an alternative view aimed at staying closer to the Qur’an and the beliefs of the ordinary Muslim. Ibn Rushd (1126-1198) responded to al-Ghazali’s critique and developed a sophisticated Aristotelian view. The present chapter explores their (...)
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  15. Mehmet Karabela (2014). Ibn Al-Rawandi. In Ibrahim Kalin (ed.), The Oxford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, Science, and Technology in Islam. Oxford University Press
  16. Mehmet Karabela (2013). The Dialectical Discourse in Classical Ottoman Literature: The Beloved Between Lover and Rival in the Game of Love. Journal of Turkish Literature 10 (1):7-19.
  17. Mehmet Karabela (2013). Between Jadal and Burhān: Reading Post-Classical Islamic Intellectual History Through Ibn Ṭufeyl’s Novel Ḥayy B. Yaḳẓān. JOURNAL OF THE FACULTY OF DIVINITY OF ANKARA UNIVERSITY 54 (2):77-93.
    This article opens a new discussion in the field of post-classical Islamic intellectual history by showing how literature and intellectual history are two inseparable and interdependent fields through an analysis of Ibn Ṭufayl’s novel, Ḥayy b. Yaqẓān. To this end, the article first examines the tension between the two concepts of jadal and burhān, which have affected much of the currents in classical Islamic intellectual history, and does so by assessing the three main figures in Ibn Ṭufayl’s novel: Ḥayy, Absāl (...)
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  18. Muhammad Ali Khalidi (2003). Al-Fārābi on the Democratic City. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 11 (3):379 – 394.
    This essay will explore some of al-Farabı’s paradoxical remarks on the nature and status of the democratic city (al-madınah al-jama`ıyyah). In describing this type of non-virtuous city, Farabı departs significantly from Plato, according the democratic city a superior standing and casting it in a more positive light. Even though at one point Farabı follows Plato in considering the timocratic city to be the best of the imperfect cities, at another point he implies that the democratic city occupies this position. Since (...)
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  19. John W. M. Krummel (forthcoming). Comparative Philosophy in Japan: Nakamura Hajime and Izutsu Toshihiko. In Bret W. Davis (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Japanese Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    This chapter discusses the comparative philosophies of two premier comparativists of postwar Japan, Nakamura Hajime and Izutsu Toshihiko. Both were known as accomplished scholars within their respective fields—Buddhist studies and Indology for Nakamura, and Islamic studies for Izutsu—when they initiated their comparative projects. Each had a distinct vision of what comparison entails and the sort of philosophy it would produce. Nakamura’s project was a world history of ideas that uncovers basic patterns in the unfolding of human thought. Izutsu aims to (...)
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  20. Maòhråus Sayyid Mursåi (1988). Al-Tarbiyah Wa-Al-Òtabåi°Ah Al-Insåanåiyah Fåi Al-Fikr Al-Islåamåi Wa-Ba°Òd Al-Falsafåat Al-Gharbåiyah. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  21. Dominique Raynaud (2013). Al-Samarqandi. Un Précurseur de l'Analyse des Controverses Scientifiques. Al-Mukhatabat. Epistemological Approaches to the History of Arabic Sciences 7:8-25.
    Despite the enthusiasm generated by social constructionism in the study of scientific debates, this contribution shows that – down to their praxeological dimension – the study of scientific controversies can benefit from sources ignored in today sociological literature. The contribution discloses these sources from the works of Shams al-Dīn al-Samarqandī (ca. 1250–ca. 1302), who is the first author to have offered etiquettes of investigation and debate (ādāb al-baḥth wa-al-munāẓara). Consequences are drawn towards constructivist epistemology.
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  22. Dominique Raynaud (2012). Abu Al-Wafa’ Latinus? A Study of Method. Historia Mathematica 39:34-83.
    This article studies the legacy in the West of Abū al-Wafā’s Book on those Geometric Constructions which are Necessary for Craftsmen. Although two-thirds of the geometric constructions in the text also appear in Renaissance works, a joint analysis of original solutions, diagram lettering and probability leads to a robust finding of independent discovery. The analysis shows that there is little chance that the similarities between the contents of Abū al-Wafā’s Book and the works of Tartaglia, Marolois and Schwenter owe anything (...)
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  23. Dominique Raynaud (2009). Why Did Geometrical Optics Not Lead to Perspective in Medieval Islam? In M. Cherkaoui & P. Hamilton (eds.), Raymond Boudon: A Life in Sociology. Bardwell Press 243-266.
    The idea that linear perspective arose only in the West due to the strength of an unusual process of rationalization is denied by the fact that IXth century Islamic scholars had yet a thorough knowledge of the optical and geometrical materials required in perspective. In addition, the process of rationalization was rarely so intense as in that time, because truth uniqueness and scientific communalism were core values of Medieval Islam. The puzzle is not a matter of less or more rationality, (...)
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  24. Ali Akbar Shah (2013). Nourooz celebration in India. SOCRATES 1 (1):80-92.
  25. M. M. Sharif (1963). Muslim Philosophy and Western Thought. Kant-Studien 54 (1-4):188-197.
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  26. Lucas Thorpe (2015). Sayyid Qutb and Aquinas: Liberalism, Natural Law and the Philosophy of Jihad. Heythrop Journal 56 (5).
  27. Richard Todd (2014). The Sufi Doctrine of Man: Ṣadr Al-Dīn Al-Qūnawī's Metaphysical Anthropology. Brill.
    In The Sufi Doctrine of Man , Richard Todd examines the life and thought of Ṣadr al-Dīn al-Qūnawī , Ibn 'Arabī's chief disciple and a key figure in the development of Sufi metaphysics.
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  28. सुहैल काकोरवी (2014). हज़रत शाह काज़िम कलन्दर. SOCRATES 1 (March 2014):262-269.
    Muslim Sufi ideology had been spread by the saints who came from various Islamic countries. The cultural and religious atmosphere of India was very favourable for Sufism which has a power to move the minds towards humanity and philanthropy. Quran teaches us that we must love God vehemently and the effect of which produces love for his creations. Sufis in their effort followed the commands of Almighty. They tried to come near all sorts of human beings and understood their agonies (...)
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