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  1. W. C. F. A. & Maxime Collignon (1887). Phidias. Journal of Hellenic Studies 8:533.
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  2. David G. Anderson (2005). Why California? The Relevance of California Archaeology and Ethnography to Eastern Woodlands Prehistory. In Michelle Hegmon, B. Sunday Eiselt & Richard I. Ford (eds.), Engaged Anthropology: Research Essays on North American Archaeology, Ethnobotany, and Museology. University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology
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  3. J. K. Anderson (1955). A Caeretan Hydria in Dunedin. Journal of Hellenic Studies 75:1.
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  4. J. R. Anderson (1883). Antefixes from Tarentum. Journal of Hellenic Studies 4:117.
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  5. M. Andronicos & P. M. Petsas (1966). Vergina, the Prehistoric Necropolis and the Hellenistic PalacePella. Journal of Hellenic Studies 86:313.
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  6. Erica Angliker (2015). Mavridis and Jensen Eds. Stable Places and Changing Perceptions: Cave Archaeology in Greece . Oxford: Archaeopress, 2013. Pp. Xxi + 333, Illus. £51. 9781407311791. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 135:279-280.
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  7. Kurt F. Anschuetz (2005). Landscapes as Memory : Archaeological History to Learn From and to Live By. In Michelle Hegmon, B. Sunday Eiselt & Richard I. Ford (eds.), Engaged Anthropology: Research Essays on North American Archaeology, Ethnobotany, and Museology. University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology
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  8. Carla Antonaccio (2010). Snodgrass Archaeology and the Emergence of Greece. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press, 2006. Pp. Ix + 485, Illus. $39.95. 9780801473548. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 130:241-243.
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  9. K. Arafat (1998). Personal Styles in Greek Sculpture. J J Pollitt, O Palagia (Edd.). The Classical Review 48 (2):426-428.
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  10. K. W. Arafat (2007). Art and Archaeology (J.) Neils Ed. The Parthenon. From Antiquity to the Present. Cambridge UP, 2005. Pp. Xvi + 430, Illus. £45. 9780521820936. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:223-.
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  11. K. W. Arafat (1998). Five Classical Sculptors. The Classical Review 48 (2):426-428.
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  12. K. W. Arafat, Corinth & E. G. Pemberton (1992). American School Excavations, Xviii, I. The Sanctuary of Demeter and Kore: The Greek Pottery. Journal of Hellenic Studies 112:216.
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  13. K. W. Arafat & B. A. Sparkes (1993). Greek Pottery, an Introduction. Journal of Hellenic Studies 113:228.
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  14. Zosia Archibald (2009). Art and Archaeology (D.) Kacharava, (M.) Faudot and (É.) Geny Eds Pont-Euxin Et Polis. Polis Hellenis Et Polis Barbaron. Actes du Xe Symposium de Vani, 23–26 Septembre 2002. Hommage À Otar Lordkipanidzé Et Pierre Lévêque. Besançon: Presses Universitaires Franc-Comtoises, 2005. Pp. 292, Illus. €40. 9782848671062. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:218-.
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  15. B. Ashmole (1969). A New Join in the Amazon Frieze of the Mausoleum. Journal of Hellenic Studies 89:22-23.
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  16. Bernard Ashmole (1967). A New Interpretation of the Portland Vase. Journal of Hellenic Studies 87:1.
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  17. Bernard Ashmole (1951). Demeter of Cnidus. Journal of Hellenic Studies 71:13.
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  18. Bernard Ashmole (1946). Kalligeneia and Hieros Arotos. Journal of Hellenic Studies 66:8.
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  19. Bernard Ashmole (1938). Manners and Methods in Archaeology. Journal of Hellenic Studies 58:240.
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  20. Bernard Ashmole (1930). Sardanapalus Again. Journal of Hellenic Studies 50:142.
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  21. Bernard Ashmole (1922). Locri Epizephyrii and the Ludovisi Throne. Journal of Hellenic Studies 42:248.
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  22. Bernard Ashmole (1922). Notes on the Sculptures of the Palazzo Dei Conservatori. Journal of Hellenic Studies 42:238.
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  23. N. G. Ashton, V. Milojcic & D. Theocharis (1979). Demetrias i. Journal of Hellenic Studies 99:205.
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  24. Carolyn C. Aslan (2013). C.B. Rose, G. Darbyshire The New Chronology of Iron Age Gordion. Pp. Xiv + 181, Figs, Ills, Maps. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, 2011. Cased, £45.50, US$69.95. ISBN: 978-1-934536-44-5. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):564-566.
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  25. Hasan Aslan (2006). Oryantalizm (Orientalism). Folklor / Edebiyat 46 (2):237-240.
    An interpretation of the photography showing that the American academician James Henry Breasted is copying the inscriptions in the temples of Egypt. Photography, taken by German photographer Koch, shows both Breasted’s and Koch’s humiliating point of view to the Old Near East. Amerikalı, Eski Yakın Doğu kültürleri akademisyenlerinden ünlü James Henry Breasted’ın 1906 yılında Mısırdaki tapınaklarda yazıtları kopyalarken çekilmiş bir fotoğrafı yorumlanmaktadır. Alman Koch’un tarafından çekilen fotoğraf hem Breasted’ın hem de Koch’un Yakın Doğuyu küçümseyici bakışını göstermektedir.
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  26. J. D. B., G. H. Chase & M. Z. Pease (1942). Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum: U. S. A. Fasc. 8, Fogg Museum and Gallatin Collections. Journal of Hellenic Studies 62:99.
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  27. J. D. B. & G. Leroux (1913). Vases Grecs Et Italo-Grecs du Musee Archeologique de Madrid. Journal of Hellenic Studies 33:142.
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  28. J. D. B. & Madeleine Massoul (1936). Corpus Vasorum Antiquorum: France 13 = Sevres, Fascicule Unique. Musee National de Sevres. Journal of Hellenic Studies 56:252.
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  29. R. D. B. & Aurel Stein (1938). Archaeological Researches in North-Western India and South-Eastern Iran. Journal of Hellenic Studies 58:102.
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  30. J. A. Baird (2014). S.H. Allen Classical Spies: American Archaeologists with the OSS in World War II Greece. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, . Pp. Xiii + 430, Illus. £24.50. 9780472117697. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 134:273-274.
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  31. John P. Barron & D. E. L. Haynes (1965). The Portland Vase. Journal of Hellenic Studies 85:246.
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  32. Vladimir Breskin (2010). Triad. Method for Studying the Core of the Semiotic Parity of Language and Art. Signs - International Journal of Semiotics 3 (2010):1-28.
    The purpose of this paper is to present and describe a new method for studying pre-speech language. The suggested approach allows correlate epistemology of linguistics to the ideological tradition of other scientific disciplines. Method is based on three linguistic categories – nouns, verbs, and interjections in their motor and expressive qualities – and their relation to the three basic forms of art – graphics (visual art), movement (dance), and sound (music). The study considers this correlation as caused by the nature (...)
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  33. Paul Cartledge (1988). Lakonian Art Maria Pipili: Laconian Iconography of the Sixth Century B.C. (Oxford University Committee for Archaeology, Monograph No. 12.) Pp. V+127; 96 B/W Illustrations, 23 Line Drawings. Oxford: O.U. Committee for Archaeology (Distributed by Oxbow Books), 1987. Paper, £22.00. Marlene Herfort-Koch: Archaische Bronzeplastik Lakoniens. (Münstersche Beiträge Zur Archäologie Boreas, 4.) Pp. 150; 22 Pages of B/W Plates, 6 Figs in Text. Münster: Archäologisches Seminar der Westfälischen Wilhelms-Universitat Munster, 1986. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (02):342-345.
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  34. Saliha Chattoo (2009). Representing a Past: A Historical Analysis of How Gender Biases Influence the Interpretation of Archaeological Remains. Constellations 1 (1).
    The cultural and temporal context that any archaeologist is a part of will necessarily bias the way in which he or she interprets material remains. While interpretation is a crucial part of the archaeological process, the preconceived notions an archaeologist may hold can colour their interpretation of the society in question. Through examples such as the excavations at Knossos in Crete, the effect such biases can have on archaeological interpretation and discourse is studied.
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  35. Greg Currie (forthcoming). Aesthetic Explanation and the Archaeology of Symbols. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayw059.
    I argue that aesthetic ideas should play a significant role in archaeological explanation. I sketch an account of aesthetic interests which is appropriate to archaeological contexts. I illustrate the role of aesthetics through a discussion of the transition from signals to symbols. I argue that the opposition in archaeological debate between explanation and interpretation is one we should reject.
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  36. Gregory Currie (2016). Aesthetic Explanation and the Archaeology of Symbols. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (3):233-246.
    I argue that aesthetic ideas should play a significant role in archaeological explanation. I sketch an account of aesthetic interests which is appropriate to archaeological contexts. I illustrate the role of aesthetics through a discussion of the transition from signals to symbols. I argue that the opposition in archaeological debate between explanation and interpretation is one we should reject.
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  37. Lale Doğer & Eda Armağan (2016). Erste Ergebnisse der Archäologischen Untersuchungen des Byzantinischen Aigai. Byzantinische Zeitschrift 109 (1):9-32.
    In this paper, a pre-assessment of the Byzantine era of Aigai will be presented. Besides the western Anatolian cities of Pergamum, Ephesus and Smyrna, Aigai is the only city which achieved to cope with the rough terrain among the Aspordenon Mountains north of Smyrna. This city located 17 km east of the Yeni Şakran town in the province Izmir, also known as Köseler castle due to its location on Mount Gün near the Köseler village in the province of Manisa, and (...)
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  38. Gary Hatfield & Holly Pittman (eds.) (2013). The Evolution of Mind, Brain, and Culture. University of Pennsylvania Press.
    Descartes boldly claimed: "I think, therefore I am." But one might well ask: Why do we think? How? When and why did our human ancestors develop language and culture? In other words, what makes the human mind human? _Evolution of Mind, Brain, and Culture_ offers a comprehensive and scientific investigation of these perennial questions. Fourteen essays bring together the work of archaeologists, cultural and physical anthropologists, psychologists, philosophers, geneticists, a neuroscientist, and an environmental scientist to explore the evolution of the (...)
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  39. Owen Hulatt (2016). On a Naqadan Vessel—Our Aesthetic Response to and Restoration of Prehistoric Artefacts. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (3):265-279.
    Prehistoric artefacts are capable of great beauty, despite our usually being in ignorance of the kind of cultural and interpretive practices which occasioned them, and which would make clear to us what such artefacts meant. I argue that often our aesthetic response to these artefacts—where we have no firm knowledge of their cultural context—is bound up with their ability to present a kind of physiognomy of the historical relationship between such objects, the historical processes which produced them and went on (...)
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  40. H. Edwin Jackson (2005). "Darkening the Sun in Their Flight" : A Zooarchaeological Accounting of Passenger Pigeons in the Prehistoric Southeast. In Michelle Hegmon, B. Sunday Eiselt & Richard I. Ford (eds.), Engaged Anthropology: Research Essays on North American Archaeology, Ethnobotany, and Museology. University of Michigan, Museum of Anthropology
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  41. Marzenna Jakubczak (2011). Natura i Bogini. Ekofeministyczna rewizja mitów według Mariji Gimbutas. Kultura I Historia 20.
    In this paper I reflect on the mythocreative potential of Gimbutas’ narrative reconstruction of archaic culture and its impact on the contemporary critique of culture. First, I revise the notion of ‘nature’ in the context of two opposing conceptual paradigms of change-over-time, namely cyclic and linear. Then, I discuss symbolic connotation of ‘Nature – Culture’ interrelationship with special reference to the ‘idyllic vision of Goddess’ proposed by Marija Gimbutas (1921-1994), American archaeologist of Lithuanian origin, the author of the groundbreaking books (...)
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  42. S. L. Kuhn & M. C. Stiner (2007). Paleolithic Ornaments: Implications for Cognition, Demography and Identity. Diogenes 54 (2):40 - 48.
    Beads and other ‘body ornaments’ are very widespread components of the archaeological record of early modern humans (Homo sapiens). They appear first in the Middle Stone Age in Africa, and somewhat later in the Early Upper Paleolithic of Eurasia. The manufacture and use of ornaments is widely considered to be evidence for significant developments in human cognition. In our view, the appearance of these objects represents the interaction of evolved cognitive capacities with changing social and demographic conditions. Body ornamentation is (...)
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  43. Steven A. LeBlanc (2003). Constant Battles: The Myth of the Peaceful, Noble Savage. St. Martin's Press.
    With armed conflict in the Persian Gulf now upon us, Harvard archaeologist Steven LeBlanc takes a long-term view of the nature and roots of war, presenting a controversial thesis: The notion of the "noble savage" living in peace with one another and in harmony with nature is a fantasy. In Constant Battles: The Myth of the Peaceful, Noble Savage , LeBlanc contends that warfare and violent conflict have existed throughout human history, and that humans have never lived in ecological balance (...)
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  44. Hisashi Nakao, Kohei Tamura, Yui Arimatsu, Tomomi Nakagawa, Naoko Matsumoto & Takehiko Matsugi (2016). Violence in the Prehistoric Period of Japan: The Spatio-Temporal Pattern of Skeletal Evidence for Violence in the Jomon Period. Biology Letters 12:20160028.
    Whether man is predisposed to lethal violence, ranging from homicide to warfare, and how that may have impacted human evolution, are among the most controversial topics of debate on human evolution. Although recent studies on the evolution of warfare have been based on various archaeological and ethnographic data, they have reported mixed results: it is unclear whether or not warfare among prehistoric hunter–gatherers was common enough to be a component of human nature and a selective pressure for the evolution of (...)
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  45. David Ridgway (2007). Mastronuzzi (G.) Repertorio dei contesti cultuali indigeni in Italia meridionale. 1. Età arcaica. (Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche & Università degli Studi di Lecce: Beni Archeologici – Conoscenza e Tecnologie, Quaderno 4.) Pp. 227, b/w & colour figs, ills, maps. Bari: Edipuglia, 2005. Paper, €40. ISBN: 978-88-7228-320-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 57 (02):565-565.
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  46. Christina Riggs (2016). Beautiful Burials, Beautiful Skulls: The Aesthetics of the Egyptian Mummy. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (3):247-263.
    This article uses Egyptian burials of the Roman period as an entry point for considering aesthetics in relation to archaeology, ancient art, and human remains. Although some archaeologists and Egyptologists reject or ignore the concept of aesthetics, this article argues that it complements questions of ontology, materiality, and social practice that concern much contemporary archaeological thought. Moreover, engaging with aesthetics in the study of the ancient world requires archaeologists to reflect critically on the relationship between disciplinary histories and knowledge production, (...)
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  47. Ayman Waziry, Are There Any Astronomical Observatories Evidences in Ancient Egypt?
    Ancient Egyptians precisely direct their temples and tombs to specific astronomical points, as attested in the designs of the Old kingdom pyramids and related temples. Likewise, the same approach was used in many religious and funerary buildings across the sequential historical epochs of ancient Egypt. This research introduces what can be called "astronomical design improvements" conducted by ancient Egyptians to secure a precise orientation for a specific direction of religious and funerary monuments. Moreover, this precise orientation requires observatories used for (...)
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  48. Alison Wylie (2013). Interdisciplinary Practice. In William Rathie, Michael Shanks, Timothy Webmoor & Christopher Witmore (eds.), Archaeology in the Making: Conversations Through a Discipline. Routledge 93-121.
    In commenting on the state of affairs in contemporary archaeology, Wylie outlines an agenda for archaeology as an interdisciplinary science rooted in ethical practices of stewardship. In so doing she lays the foundations for an informed and philosophically relevant “meta-archaeology.”.
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  49. Alison Wylie (2009). What’s Feminist About Gender Archaeology? In Que(e)rying Archaeology: Proceedings of the 36th Annual Chacmool Conference. University of Calgary Archaeology Association 282-289.
    I explore the relevance of feminist standpoint theory for understanding the development of gender research in archaeology. This is an approach to thinking about questions about gender in archaeology that I find fruitfully articulated in Jane Kelley and Marsha Hanen's analysis of the 1989 Chacmool abstracts. As standpoint theory has been reformulated in recent years it offers a strategy for understanding critically and constructively-what is (and is not) feminist about gender archaeology, and it suggests some guidelines for realizing "strong objectivity." (...)
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  50. Alison Wylie (2000). Foreword. In Kurt E. Dongoske, Mark Aldenderfer & Karen Doehner (eds.), Working Together: Native Americans and Archaeologists. Society for American Archaeology
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