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  1. Greg Bamford, Representational and Realised Design: Problems for Analogies Between Organisms and Artifacts. Copenhagen Working Papers on Design 2010 // No. 2.
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  2. Greg Bamford (2003). Research, Knowledge and Design. In Clare Newton, Sandra Kaj-O'Grady & Simon Wollan (eds.), Design + Research: Project Based Research in Architecture. Second International Conference of the Association of Australasian Schools of Architecture, Melbourne 28 – 30 September, 2003. Association of Architecture Schools of Australasia.
    The discussion about relations between research and design has a number of strands, and presumably motivations. Putting aside the question whether or not design or “creative endeavour” should be counted as research, for reasons to do with institutional recognition or reward, the question remains how, if at all, is design research? This question is unlikely to have attracted much interest but for matters external to Architecture within the modern university. But Architecture as a discipline now needs to understand research much (...)
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  3. Greg Bamford (2002). From Analysis/Synthesis to Conjecture/Analysis: A Review of Karl Popper’s Influence on Design Methodology in Architecture. [REVIEW] Design Studies 23 (3):245 - 61.
    The two principal models of design in methodological circles in architecture—analysis/synthesis and conjecture/analysis—have their roots in philosophy of science, in different conceptions of scientific method. This paper explores the philosophical origins of these models and the reasons for rejecting analysis/synthesis in favour of conjecture/analysis, the latter being derived from Karl Popper’s view of scientific method. I discuss a fundamental problem with Popper’s view, however, and indicate a framework for conjecture/analysis to avoid this problem.
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  4. Greg Bamford (1991). Design, Science and Conceptual Analysis. In Jim Plume (ed.), Architectural Science and Design in Harmony: Proceedings of the joint ANZAScA / ADTRA conference, Sydney, 10-12 July, 1990. School of Architecture, University of NSW.
    Philosophers expend considerable effort on the analysis of concepts, but the value of such work is not widely appreciated. This paper principally analyses some arguments, beliefs, and presuppositions about the nature of design and the relations between design and science common in the literature to illustrate this point, and to contribute to the foundations of design theory.
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  5. J. C. Berendzen (2008). Institutional Design and Public Space: Hegel, Architecture, and Democracy. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):291-307.
  6. Arnold Berleant (ed.) (2002). The Environment and the Arts. Ashgate Press.
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  7. Jurgen Bey, Joost Grootens, Erik Rietveld, Ronald Rietveld, Saskia Van Stein & Barbara Visser (eds.) (2010). Vacant NL, Where Architecture Meets Ideas. NAI.
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  8. Thorsten Botz-Bornstein (2010). Is Critical Regionalist Philosophy Possible? Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):11-25.
    In architecture, the concept of Critical Regionalism gained popularity as a synthesis of universal, “modern” elements and individualistic elements derived from local cultures. Critical Regionalist alternatives are more than a postmodern mix of ethno styles but integrate conceptual qualities like local light, perspective, and tectonic quality into a modern architectural framework. In order to “critically” root architectural works in their corresponding traditions, Critical Regionalists base their conceptual stances on those philosophers that have produced a critical consciousness in European culture like (...)
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  9. Rory J. Conces (2011). Using Public Evocative Objects to Support a Multiethnic Democractic Society in Kosovo (II) Fields of Existence Vs. Fields of Battle. Bosnia Daily:9-10.
  10. Rory J. Conces (2011). Using Public Evocative Objects to Support a Multiethnic Democratic Society in Kosovo (I) Friendly and Enemy Images. Bosnia Daily.
  11. C. E. Emmer (2001). The Senses of the Sublime: Possibilities for a Non-Ocular Sublime in Kant's Critique of Judgment. In Volker Gerhardt, Rolf Horstmann & Ralph Schumacher (eds.), Kant und die Berliner Aufklärung: Akten des IX. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses, Vol. 3. Walter de Gruyter.
    It might at first seem that the senses (the five traditionally recognized conduits of outer sense) would have very little to contribute to an investigation of Kant's aesthetics. Is not Kant's aesthetic theory based on a relation of the higher cognitive faculties? Much however can be revealed by asking to what degree sight is essential to aesthetic judgment (of beauty and the sublime) as Kant describes it in the 'Critique of Judgment.' Here the sublime receives particular attention.
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  12. J. F. Humphrey (2012). “Review Essay of George Hinge and Jens A. Krasilnikoff, (Eds.), Alexandria: A Cultural and Religious Melting Pot (Aarhus, Denmark: Aarhus University Press, 1990),”. [REVIEW] Nordicum-Mediterraneum 7 (1).
  13. Gerald Keaney (2012). Free Play and the Foreclosure of New Babylon. Environment and Planning D 30:418-433.
    Automation may be able to completely eliminate the need for labour. But how should we use the freed-up time? In his proposal for a future urbanism, New Babylon, Constant Nieuwenhuys thought people would engage in nonstop free play, remaking surroundings. I argue that at the core of New Babylon is an intuition about a satisfying life, that of Homo ludens. This intuition had a broad appeal in the 1960s. New Babylon is an intuition pump, not a utopia, and Constant wants (...)
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  14. Gavin Keeney (2011). &Quot;else-Where&Quot;: Essays in Art, Architecture, and Cultural Production 2002-2011. Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    “Else-where” is a synoptic survey of the representational values given to art, architecture, and cultural production from 2002 through 2011. Written primarily as a critique of what is suppressed in architecture and what is disclosed in art, the essays are informed by the passage out of post-structuralism and its disciplinary analogues toward the real Real (denoted over the course of the studies as the “Real-Irreal” or “Else-where”). While architecture nominally addresses an environmental ethos, it also famously negotiates its own representational (...)
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  15. Donald Kuspit (ed.) (1998). Art Criticism.
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  16. Daniel Libeskind (1992). Between the Lines: The Jewish Museum, Berlin. Research in Phenomenology 22 (1):82-87.
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  17. Kevin Melchionne (2002). Front Yards. In Arnold Berleant (ed.), The Environment and the Arts. Ashgate Press.
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  18. Kevin Melchionne (1998). Re-Thinking Site-Specificity in Public Art: Some Critical and Philosophical Problems. In Donald Kuspit (ed.), Art Criticism. 36-49.
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  19. Erik Rietveld (2008). Situated Normativity: The Normative Aspect of Embodied Cognition in Unreflective Action. Mind 117 (468):973-1001.
    In everyday life we often act adequately, yet without deliberation. For instance, we immediately obtain and maintain an appropriate distance from others in an elevator. The notion of normativity implied here is a very basic one, namely distinguishing adequate from inadequate, correct from incorrect, or better from worse in the context of a particular situation. In the first part of this paper I investigate such ‘situated normativity’ by focusing on unreflective expert action. More particularly, I use Wittgenstein’s examples of craftsmen (...)
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  20. Erik Rietveld & Ronald Rietveld (2011). The Paradox of Spontaneity and Design: Designing Spontaneous Interactions. Oase 2011 (85):33-41.
    This paper illustrates how affordance-based design can contribute to solutions for the grand challenges that society faces. The design methodology of ‘strategic interventions’ is explained.
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  21. Ronald Rietveld & Erik Rietveld (2010). Vacant NL, Where Architecture Meets Ideas: Curatorial Statement 12th Venice Architecture Biennale. In Jurgen Bey, Joost Grootens, Erik Rietveld, Ronald Rietveld, Saskia Van Stein & Barbara Visser (eds.), Vacant NL, Where Architecture Meets Ideas. NAI.
    For the Venice Architecture Biennale 2010, curator Rietveld Landscape has been invited by the Netherlands Architecture Institute (NAI) to make a statement about the potential of landscape architecture to contribute to resolving the complex challenges that our society faces today. These challenges call for innovation; for a culture centred on design skills and cooperation between scientists and creative pioneers. The installation ‘Vacant NL, where architecture meets ideas’ calls upon the Dutch government to make use of the enormous potential of inspiring, (...)
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  22. Ronald Rietveld & Erik Rietveld (2009). A Call for Strategic Interventions. In Ole Bouman, Anneke Abhelakh, Mieke Dings & Martine Zoeteman (eds.), Architecture of Consequence: Dutch Designs on the Future. NAI Publishers.
    Given the contemporary complexity of cities, landscape and society, urgent social tasks call for an integral, multidisciplinary approach. Rietveld Landscape’s strategic interventions focus and use the forces of existing developments and processes. This design method creates new opportunities for landscape, architecture, the public domain, ecology, recreation and economic activity.
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