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  1. Keith Acheson (2000). Disciplined Stories in the Governance of the New Institutional Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 7 (3):341-371.
    The New Institutional Economics (NIE) occupies an important space in the rapidly expanding theory of organization. Traditional testing techniques have only been applied to less complex parts of the NIE. A rich body of evidence generated by the experiences of firms and other organizations lies fallow. The limited domain of traditional testing will persist because of the nature of the central concepts of the NIE, the difficulty posed for integrating transaction cost into an optimizing framework by self-reference, and the particularly (...)
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  2. John Aldrich (2006). When Are Inferences Too Fragile to Be Believed? Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):161-177.
    The use of sensitivity analysis is routine in some fields of empirical econometrics, although econometric theorists have generally taken a critical attitude towards it. This paper presents a framework in which arguments for and against such analysis can be evaluated. It appears that sensitivity is not necessarily a bad, nor sturdiness necessarily a good.
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  3. Siobhan Austen & Therese Jefferson (2006). Comparing Responses to Critical Realism. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (2):257-282.
    This article is a study of the response of two heterodox schools of economic thought to ?new? philosophical ideas. Specifically, it considers the response within Post Keynesian and feminist economics to Tony Lawson's recent call for economists to pay greater attention to ontology and for economists to adopt research methods consistent with critical realism. Lawson's arguments were formally introduced to these schools over the space of a few years and continue to generate considerable discussion within their ranks. The focus of (...)
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  4. Roger E. Backhouse (2011). New Directions in Economics and the Philosophy of Economics? The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 18 (3):305-311.
  5. Andy Bahn & John Gowdy (2003). Economics Weak and Strong: Ecological Economics and Human Survival. World Futures 59 (3 & 4):253 – 262.
    Mounting evidence suggests that the human impact on the planet is reaching the point where the Earth's ecosystems will not be able to support the level of human occupation. The global economy also seems to be generating income disparities that threaten the social stability of even the most developed economies. Although both these trends are rooted in the operation of the global market economy, standard economics has surprisingly little to offer in the way of policies that might allow us to (...)
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  6. Matthieu Ballandonne (2012). New Economics of Science, Economics of Scientific Knowledge and Sociology of Science: The Case of Paul David. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (4):391-406.
    For a little more than twenty years, the terminology used in the economics of science has changed significantly with the development of expressions such as ?new economics of science? (NES) and ?economics of scientific knowledge? (ESK). This article seeks to shed light on the use of these different terminologies by studying the work of the economist of science Paul David. We aim to use his work as a case study in order to argue for a difference between NES and ESK (...)
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  7. Thomas Basbøll (2006). Reflexivity in Perspective: A Note on Davis and Klaes' Reading ofLas Meninas. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):113-119.
  8. Lawrence A. Berger (1989). Economics and Hermeneutics. Economics and Philosophy 5 (02):209-.
  9. Ana Maria Bianchi & Cleofas Salviano (1999). Raúl Prebisch and the Beginnings of the Latin American School of Economics: A Rhetorical Perspective. Journal of Economic Methodology 6 (3):423-438.
    Fifty years ago, the Argentinean economist Raúl Prebisch published a paper called Estúdio Económico de América Latina. The Estúdio was one of the first texts that set up what was later termed the ?Prebisch-Singer thesis? or, more widely, the Latin American School of Economics. According to this document, Latin American countries should undergo an industrialization program under the direct supervision of the national state. The rationale for this thesis was the deterioration of the terms of trade for countries exporting primary (...)
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  10. Peter J. Boettke (2004). Obituary. Don Lavoie (1950–2001). Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):377-379.
  11. Peter J. Boettke (1990). Individuals and Institutions. Critical Review 4 (1-2):10-26.
    ECONOMICS AND INSTITUTIONS: A MANIFESTO FOR MODERN INSTITUTIONAL ECONOMICS by Geoffrey Hodgson Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1988. 365pp., $39.95 Traditional institutional economics argued that the methodological individualism of both classical and neoclassical economics was grounded in a false conception of human nature and a pre?scientific understanding of economic life. Geoffrey Hodgson has provided a restatement of this position and extended the institutionalist critique to modern developments within economics at both a positive and normative level. In the course of doing (...)
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  12. Bryan L. Boulier & Robert S. Goldfarb (1998). On the Use and Nonuse of Surveys in Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 5 (1):1-21.
    While it is widely alleged that economists do not like or use questionnaire surveys, the facts are considerably more complicated. Economists make extensive use of survey information on such things as prices and employment, and the use of ?contingent valuation? surveys has exploded recently. The paper reviews the historical debate that led to economists? seeming distrust of surveys. It then investigates why there is extensive use of surveys in the face of methodological strictures against survey use. To do this, the (...)
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  13. Vivienne Brown (1997). 'Mere Inventions of the Imagination': A Survey of Recent Literature on Adam Smith. Economics and Philosophy 13 (2):281-312.
  14. Graham A. Brownlow (2010). Structure and Change: Douglass North's Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (3):301-316.
    Douglass North is a pivotal figure in the development of the ?new? economic history as well as the ?new? institutional economics. However, the relationship between these two aspects of his thinking remains undeveloped in previous critical assessments of North's work. The relationship is clarified here. The evidence presented indicates that three distinct phases can be distinguished in his writings between the 1950s and the 2000s. The paper relates these changing views to the shifting mainstream within economics and the effects that (...)
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  15. Bryan Caplan (2005). Toward a New Consensus on the Economics of Socialism: Rejoinder to My Critics. Critical Review 17 (1-2):203-220.
    Abstract This has been an unusually productive exchange. My critics largely accept my main theoretical claims about economic calculation and socialism. They have also started to do what advocates of the Misesian view should have been doing for decades: offer empirical evidence that that the calculation problem is serious. While I continue to believe that incentive problems explain most of the failures of socialism, I am slightly less confident than I was before. Fortunately, there are many unexploited sources of information (...)
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  16. Bryan Caplan (2004). Is Socialism Really “Impossible”? Critical Review 16 (1):33-52.
    Abstract In the 1920s, Austrian?school economists began to argue that in a fully socialized economy, free of competitively generated prices, central planners would have no way to calculate which methods of production would be the most economical. They claimed that this ?economic calculation problem? showed that socialism is ?impossible.? Although many believe that the Austrian position was later vindicated by the collapse of the Soviet bloc, the Austrian school's own methodology disallows such a conclusion. And historical evidence suggests that poor (...)
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  17. François Claveau (2013). The Elgar Companion to Recent Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (1):81 - 86.
    (2013). The Elgar companion to recent economic methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 20, Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession, pp. 81-86. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2013.774853.
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  18. Tyler Cowen (2000). Risk and Business Cycles: Reply to Rosser. Critical Review 14 (1):89-94.
    Abstract Rosser's thoughtful and careful review of my book on business cycles reflects a different methodological stance than my own. I believe that economic theory and macroeconomics cannot escape using the concept of risk, even though, as Rosser points out, risk is not a simple unidimensional magnitude in many circumstances. I view the rational expectations assumption as a useful way of presenting a theory, rather than as a descriptive account of real?world expectations.
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  19. John B. Davis (2007). The Turn in Economics and the Turn in Economic Methodology. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (3):275-290.
  20. John B. Davis (2005). Introduction. Journal of Economic Methodology 12 (3):361-361.
  21. John B. Davis (2004). Introduction. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):273-273.
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  22. John Davis & Wade Hands (2013). Introduction: Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession. Journal of Economic Methodology 20 (1):1 - 5.
    (2013). Introduction: Methodology, systemic risk, and the economics profession. Journal of Economic Methodology: Vol. 20, Methodology, Systemic Risk, and the Economics Profession, pp. 1-5. doi: 10.1080/1350178X.2013.774842.
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  23. Sheila Dow (2007). Introduction: The Methodology of Development Economics. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (1):1-4.
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  24. Sheila C. Dow (2004). Reorienting Economics: Some Epistemological Issues. Journal of Economic Methodology 11 (3):307-312.
    Criticizes the book "Reorienting Economics," by Tony Lawson. Emphasis on the character of the middle ground between positivism and relativism; Conception of reality implicit in economic practice; Inconsistency between the methodology of orthodox economics.
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  25. Sheila C. Dow (2001). Methodology in a Pluralist Environment. Journal of Economic Methodology 8 (1):33-40.
  26. Sheila C. Dow & Dipak Ghosh (2009). Fuzzy Logic and Keynes's Speculative Demand for Money. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (1):57-69.
    The purpose of the paper is to explore the potential for using fuzzy logic to analyse economic decision?making under Keynesian uncertainty, and in particular in circumstances where variety of opinion is important. Fuzzy logic is shown to apply where expectations may differ because the nature of the subject matter impedes any ?crisp? way of describing the underlying variables. The particular case of the speculative demand for money is considered, since it explicitly reflects variety of opinion as to whether interest rates (...)
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  27. Paul Downward (ed.) (2003). Applied Economics and the Critical Realist Critique. Routledge.
    This intriguing new book examines and analyses the role of critical realism in economics and specifically how this line of thought can be applied to the real world. With contributions from such varying commentators as Sheila Dow, Wendy Olsen and Fred Lee, this new book is unique in its approach and will be of great interest to both economic methodologists and those involved in applied economic studies.
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  28. Ross B. Emmett (2006). De Gustibusestdisputandum: Frank H. Knight's Reply to George Stigler and Gary Becker's 'De Gustibus Non Est Disputandum' with an Introductory Essay. Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (1):97-111.
  29. Stefano Fiori (2009). Hayek's Theory on Complexity and Knowledge: Dichotomies, Levels of Analysis, and Bounded Rationality. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (3):265-285.
    Hayek maintains that models of complexity must consider two closely interrelated factors: the large number of variables and the connections among them. These two conditions, which define complex phenomena, exhibit a different logical dimension. The former (the ?large number of variables?) describes complexity in quantitative (numerical) terms; the latter provides a view of complex phenomena in logical-relational terms, and it is evoked to explain the emergent properties of the whole. Despite the close relation between these concepts, the first notion essentially (...)
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  30. Steve Fleetwood (2012). 'From Political Economy to Economics' and Beyond. Historical Materialism 20 (3):61-80.
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  31. Björn Frank (2012). Economic Page Turners. Journal of Economic Methodology 19 (3):317-327.
    Economic page turners like Freakonomics are well written and there is much to be learned from them ? not only about economics, but also about writing techniques. Their authors know how to build up suspense, i.e., they make readers want to know what comes. An uncountable number of pages in books and magazines are filled with advice on writing reportages or suspense novels. While many of the tips are specific to the respective genres, some carry over to economic page turners (...)
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  32. Alan Freeman & Andrew Kliman (2008). Beyond Talking the Talk. In Edward Fullbrook (ed.), Pluralist Economics. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan.
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  33. Bruno S. Frey, Silke Humbert & Friedrich Schneider (2010). What is Economics? Attitudes and Views of German Economists. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (3):317-332.
    Which schools of thought are favored by German economists? What makes a good economist and which economists have been most influential? These questions were addressed in a survey, conducted in the summer of 2006 among the members of the ?Verein für Socialpolitik?. An econometric analysis is used to identify to what extent ideological preferences or personal factors determine the respondents' answers. Our results suggest that German economists favor neoclassical economic theory as a school of thought and appreciate the contributions of (...)
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  34. Edward Fullbrook (ed.) (2009). Ontology and Economics: Tony Lawson and His Critics. Routledge.
    This original book brings together some of the world's leading critics of economics orthodoxy to debate Lawson's contribution to the economics literature.
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  35. Edward Fullbrook (2008). Narrative Pluralism. In , Pluralist Economics. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan.
  36. Edward Fullbrook (ed.) (2008). Pluralist Economics. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan.
  37. Roberto Fumagalli (2010). The Disunity of Neuroeconomics: A Methodological Appraisal. Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):119-131.
    The recent advancements at the interface between economics and neuroscience have encouraged neuroeconomists to raise several criticisms concerning the economic theory of choice. At present, however, there is little agreement with regard to the theoretical presuppositions and the explanatory aims of neuroeconomics. In this paper, I assess the scope and the significance of neuroeconomists' divergences, casting doubt on their attempts to provide a unified theoretical framework for analysing human choice behaviour. Moreover, I highlight some respects in which methodologically informed considerations (...)
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  38. Regenia Gagnier (2009). Individualism, Civilization, and National Character in Market Democracies. In Jack Amariglio, Joseph W. Childers & Stephen Cullenberg (eds.), Sublime Economy: On the Intersection of Art and Economics. Routledge.
  39. Dipak Ghosh (2007). The Metamorphosis of Lewis's Dual Economy Model. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (1):5-25.
    This paper argues that Arthur Lewis originally presented the problem of economic development in terms of an open system, in the sense that it focused on a number of possible pitfalls and socio?economic constraints in the process of capital accumulation and industrialization in a labour?surplus economy. In the hands of the neoclassical economists, who were predominantly interested in achieving deterministic equilibrium results by introducing strict assumptions, the theoretical system later became closed ? something Lewis never intended. JEL Classifications: B41, O10, (...)
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  40. J. Gil-Aluja, A. M. Gil-Lafuente & J. Gil-Lafuente (2010). Financial Fragility and Interacting Units: An Exercise / C. Chiarella, S. Giansante, S. Sordi, A. Vercelli ; Part III: Techniques and Tools: Using Homogeneous Groupings in Portfolio Management. [REVIEW] In Marisa Faggini, Concetto Paolo Vinci, Antonio Abatemarco, Rossella Aiello, F. T. Arecchi, Lucio Biggiero, Giovanna Bimonte, Sergio Bruno, Carl Chiarella, Maria Pia Di Gregorio, Giacomo Di Tollo, Simone Giansante, Jaime Gil Aluja, A. I͡U Khrennikov, Marianna Lyra, Riccardo Meucci, Guglielmo Monaco, Giancarlo Nota, Serena Sordi, Pietro Terna, Kumaraswamy Velupillai & Alessandro Vercelli (eds.), Decision Theory and Choices: A Complexity Approach. Springer Verlag Italia.
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  41. Robert S. Goldfarb (1995). The Economist-as-Audience Needs a Methodology of Plausible Inference. Journal of Economic Methodology 2 (2):201-222.
    Economists often try to make plausible inferences from a sizable empirical literature addressing a particular measurement, direction-of-effect, or testing issue. There are serious methodological problems associated with drawing such inferences. This article sets out some of these problems in order to make a case for their importance. After discussing these problems, the paper presents three case study examples of inference difficulties in specific literatures. It then proposes a new hypothesis about the time pattern of publication bias in empirical economics literatures. (...)
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  42. Robert S. Goldfarb & Jonathan Ratner (2009). Exploring Different Visions of the Model–Empirics Nexus: Solow Versus Lipsey. Journal of Economic Methodology 16 (2):159-174.
    Does empirical work in economics both provoke and test theoretical models, or does model development proceed according to a theory-oriented research program, with little interaction with empirics? Robert Solow and Richard Lipsey have articulated different visions of this relationship. This paper: (i) describes these competing Solow versus Lipsey views; (ii) presents examples illustrating each view; and (iii) draws inferences about factors promoting a close relation between empirics and modeling. Three examples are examined in detail: the ?nursing shortage? literature; Lind's analysis (...)
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  43. Jean-Joseph Goux (1990). Symbolic Economies: After Marx and Freud. Cornell University Press.
    Looking closely at the work of such major figures as Lacan, Derrida, and Nietzsche, Goux extends the implications of Marxism and Freudianism to an interdisciplinary semiotics of value and proposes a radical concept of exchange.
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  44. William B. Griffith (1987). Marshall, Orthodoxy and the Professionalisation of Economics, John Maloney, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1985, 278 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 3 (02):361-.
  45. Till Grüne-Yanoff (2006). Cognitive Economics. An Interdisciplinary Approach, Paul Bourgine and Jean-Pierre Nadal, Eds. Springer, 2004, XIV + 479 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 22 (3):448-455.
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  46. Francesco Guala & Tim Hodgson (2010). The Philosopher in the Scanner (Or: How Can Neuroscience Contribute to Social Philosophy?). Journal of Economic Methodology 17 (2):147-157.
    Analytical philosophy has been challenged by experimental approaches that make use of, among other things, cognitive science methods. In this paper we illustrate the benefits of merging philosophy with neuroscience, using an example of research in the foundations of social science. We argue that designing novel experiments to answer specific philosophical questions has several advantages compared to relying passively on neuroscientists' data. In this particular case, the data redirect attention towards topics ? such as inductive reasoning ? that are relatively (...)
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  47. Bruno Gullì (2005). Labor of Fire: The Ontology of Labor Between Economy and Culture. Temple University Press.
  48. Omar Hamuuda (1996). La science économique à la recherche de ses fondements: La tradition épistémologique ricardienne 1826–1891, Michel Zouboulakis. Presses Universitaires de France, 1993, 227 + viii pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 12 (02):234-.
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  49. Mohamed Aslam Haneef (2008). Islamic Economics : A Case Study. In Edward Fullbrook (ed.), Pluralist Economics. Distributed in the Usa Exclusively by Palgrave Macmillan.
  50. Neil Hart (1996). Equilibrium and Time: Marshall's Dilemma. Journal of Economic Methodology 3 (2):285-306.
    The neglect and misinterpretation of Marshall's treatment of time led many of his followers and critics to overlook the significance of the qualifications and criticisms of equilibrium analysis in his Principles. This misinterpretation arises from a failure to fully understand the purpose and method of Marshall's analysis. Marshall's methodological struggles in Principles did not arise from an attempt to preserve the concept of competitive equilibrium in a world where increasing returns are pervasive. Rather, they emanated from an attempt at providing (...)
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