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  1. G. A. (1976). Art and Inquiry. Review of Metaphysics 29 (4):741-741.
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  2. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (ed.) (1976). Culture and Art: An Anthology. Humanities Press.
    Danto, A. The artworld.--Dickie, G. What is art?--Margolis, J. Works of art are physically embodied and culturally emergent entities.--Kjørup, S. Art broadly and wholly conceived.--Meyer, L. B. Forgery and the anthropology of art.--Brunius, T. Theory and ideologies in aesthetics.--Tilghman, B. R. Artistic puzzlement.--Binkley, T. Deciding about art.--Alexander, H. G. On defining in aesthetics.--Iseminger, G. Appreciation, the artworld, and the aesthetic.--Glickman, J. Creativity in the arts.--Sclafani, R. The theory of art.--Lyas, C. Danto and Dickie on art.--Beardsley, M. C. Is art essentially (...)
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  3. F. Antal (1952). The Moral Purpose of Hogarth's Art. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 15 (3/4):169-197.
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  4. Rudolf Arnheim (1999). Art as Such. British Journal of Aesthetics 39 (3):252-254.
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  5. A. B. (1963). Zen in Japanese Art-A Way of Spiritual Experience. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):801-801.
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  6. James Baird (1957). Creating Art. Review of Metaphysics 11 (1):108 - 121.
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  7. Cyril Barrett (1982). The Morality of Artistic Production. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 41 (2):137-144.
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  8. Christopher Bartel (2005). Art and Value. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (1):94-96.
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  9. K. Bortsova (2012). Note on the Cover Artist. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (4):441-441.
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  10. Peggy Zeglin Brand (2006). Feminist Art Epistemologies: Understanding Feminist Art. Hypatia 21 (3):166-189.
    : Feminist art epistemologies (FAEs) greatly aid the understanding of feminist art, particularly when they serve to illuminate the hidden meanings of an artist's intent. The success of parodic imagery produced by feminist artists (feminist visual parodies, FVPs) necessarily depends upon a viewer's recognition of the original work of art created by a male artist and the realization of the parodist's intent to ridicule and satirize. As Brand shows in this essay, such recognition and realization constitute the knowledge of a (...)
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  11. V. C. C. (1957). On Painting. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):534-534.
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  12. V. C. C. (1957). On Painting. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):534-534.
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  13. Laurie Calhoun (1994). Institutions and Deviance: Art and Psychiatry. Critical Review 8 (3):393-409.
    Deviance is esteemed in the art world, and all great artists have broken with the traditions that preceded them and rebelled against their contemporaries. Yet in society deviance is more often than not condemned. Our apparently contradictory attitudes toward artistic and social deviance are explicable in light of the conservative nature of institutions and the nature of comprehensibility and psychiatry.
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  14. Jean-Pierre Cometti (2011). La fabrique de l'art. Aisthesis. Pratiche, Linguaggi E Saperi Dell’Estetico 4 (2).
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  15. Preston K. Covey, Art or Forgery? The Strange Case of Han Van Meegeren.
    The appreciation or historical study of visual art depends crucially on assumptions or claims that given art works can be attributed to given artists in given periods; both the appreciation and history of art presuppose a methodology of attribution and a theory of evidence; and these are open to philosophic question and analysis. Apparently straighforward, deceptively prosaic empirical questions of attribution (By whom was a given work created and when? ) are themselves often influenced by judgments of aesthetic value (as (...)
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  16. John Dilworth (2003). Pictorial Orientation Matters. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (1):39-56.
    important, though previously neglected, role in an adequate understanding of the nature and identity of visual artworks and other pictures. Using a previous contrast (‘Artworks versus Designs’, British Journal of Aesthetics, vol. 41, no. 4 [October 2001]), I show that differing orientations of a design naturally give rise to distinct pictures, which may be appropriated as distinct artworks by a discerning artist—which also shows that such artworks cannot be types, since they share a common token. The investigation also raises some (...)
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  17. Denis Dutton, Han Van Meegeren.
    The most notorious and celebrated forger of the twentieth century, Han van Meegeren (1889-1947), was born in the Dutch town of Deventer. He was fascinated by drawing as a child, and pursued it despite his father’s disapproval, sometimes spending all his pocket money on art supplies. In high school he was able finally to receive professional instruction, and went on to study architecture, according to his father’s wishes. In 1911 he married Anna de Voogt. His artistic talents were recognized when (...)
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  18. Paulo Alexandre E. Castro (ed.) (2014). Mark Rothko and Romy Castro. ThePhilosophersBookCompany & Createspace.
    This book is about what Mark Rothko and Romy Castro think about painting. The bottom line placed here is: what is matter for a painter? What they want to communicate with their art? And how they do it? This book seeks to uncover some of the secrets that are in minds painters. In the backgrond, waht unites, apparently, two such different artists is the way they establish intimacy with matter, even that a concept of matter or intimacy may assume and (...)
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  19. C. E. Emmer (2013). 9/11 as Schmaltz-Attractor: A Coda on the Significance of Kitsch. In Monica Kjellman-Chapin (ed.), Kitsch: History, Theory, Practice. Cambridge Scholars Publishing. 184-224.
    "The concluding chapter, penned by C. E. Emmer, both revisits and greatly expands upon disputations within the contested territory of kitsch as term and tool in cultural turf-war arsenals. Focusing on debates surrounding two visual responses to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Dennis Madalone's 2003 music video for the patriotic anthem 'America We Stand As One' and Jenny Ryan's 'plushie' sculpture, 'Soft 9/11,' Emmer utilizes these debates to reveal the coexisting and competing attitudes towards ostensibly kitschy objects and (...)
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  20. C. E. Emmer (2008). Crowther and the Kantian Sublime in Art. In Valerio Rohden, Ricardo R. Terra & Guido A. de Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants: Akten des X. Internationalen Kant-Kongresses [Right and Peace in Kant's Philosophy: Proceedings of the 10th International Kant Congress] 5 vols. Walter de Gruyter.
    Paul Crowther, in his book, The Kantian Sublime (1989), works to reconstruct Kant's aesthetics in order to make its continued relevance to contemporary aesthetic concerns more visible. The present article remains within the area of Crowther's "cognitive" sublime, to show that there is much space for expanding upon Kantian varieties of the sublime, particularly in art.
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  21. Sidney Walter Finkelstein (1954). Realism in Art. New York, International Publishers.
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  22. Simon Fokt (2013). A Proposal for a Dualistic Ontology of Art. Sztuka I Filozofia 42:29-47.
    While pluralism in ontology of art improves on various monistic views, through its eclectic approach it lost a lot of their simplicity, parsimony, unity and intuitiveness. The dualistic theory presented in this paper offers an alternative – it shares the advantages of the monistic views while retaining the wide scope of pluralism, and thus should be preferred for methodological reasons. On this view all artworks are at the same time abstract universals which are called recipes, and particular physical objects – (...)
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  23. Steve Garlick (2002). The Beauty of Friendship: Foucault, Masculinity and the Work of Art. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (5):558-577.
    The importance of friendship in the later work of Michel Foucault is increasingly being recognized, but the relationship between friendship and Foucault's concept of 'life as a work of art' is not well understood. Friendship, traditionally associated with 'masculine' virtue, can be seen to undergo significant change in connection with the emergence of modern sexuality. I suggest that Foucault's work alerts us to the fact that friendship is a key site for challenging the stability of the modern gender regime and (...)
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  24. John Gibson (2010). Interpretation, Sincerity and "Theory". Contemporary Aesthetics 8.
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  25. D. W. Gotshalk (1941). A Relational Theory of Fine Art. Journal of Philosophy 38 (13):350-359.
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  26. K. E. Gover (2012). Christoph Büchel V. Mass MoCA: A Tilted Arc for the Twenty-First Century. Journal of Aesthetic Education 46 (1):46-58.
    The 1990 Visual Artists Rights Act (VARA) is a provision of U.S. copyright law that seeks to protect the noneconomic rights of artists, called "moral rights." These rights are due to the "presumed intimate bond between artists and their works."1 In the United States it protects rights of artistic attribution and integrity: the artwork cannot be claimed as the work of another, and it cannot be distorted. In some cases VARA protects artworks from destruction. But what is the nature of (...)
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  27. J. R. Hamilton (2013). Living in an Artworld. British Journal of Aesthetics (1):ays065.
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  28. Robert Hopkins (2006). Painting, History, and Experience. Philosophical Studies 127 (1):19 - 35.
    Two themes run through Wollheim’s work: the importance of history to the practice and appreciation of the arts, and the centrality of experience in appreciation. Prima facie, these are in tension. Reconciling them requires two steps. First, adopt a notion of experience on which features can be experienced even if we must have experience-independent access to the fact that the work exhibits them. Second, state what makes a particular experience appropriate to the work. What does so? Although Wollheim toyed with (...)
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  29. Robert Hopkins (2004). Painting, Sculpture, Sight, and Touch. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (2):149-166.
    I raise two questions that bear on the aesthetics of painting and sculpture. First, painting involves perspective, in the sense that everything represented in a painting is represented from a point, or points, within represented space; is sculpture also perspectival? Second, painting is specially linked to vision; is sculpture linked in this way either to vision or to touch? To clarify the link between painting and vision, I describe the perspectival structure of vision. Since this is the same structure we (...)
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  30. Gizela Horvath (2014). Extended Aesthetic Experience. Pragmatism Today 5 (2):67-72.
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  31. Gizela Horváth (2014). Extended Aesthetic Experience in Contemporary Art. Pragmatism Today 5 (2):67-72.
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  32. Gizela Horvath (2013). WHY THE BRILLO BOX? THE RECOVERY OF THE AESTHETIC. In Applied Social Sciences: Philosophy and Theology.
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  33. Gizela Horvath (2012). Tükröm, tükröm... Az önarckép lehetőségei a kortárs képzőművészetben. Korunk (9):19-28.
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  34. Gaetano Iaia (2011). Rappresentazione dell’inimmaginabile: l’immagine sacra, silenzioso “segno messianico”. Capys 2 (2):255-267.
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  35. Sherri Irvin (2005). Appropriation and Authorship in Contemporary Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (2):123-137.
    Appropriation art has often been thought to support the view that authorship in art is an outmoded or misguided notion. Through a thought experiment comparing appropriation art to a unique case of artistic forgery, I examine and reject a number of candidates for the distinction that makes artists the authors of their work while forgers are not. The crucial difference is seen to lie in the fact that artists bear ultimate responsibility for whatever objectives they choose to pursue through their (...)
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  36. Dale Jacquette (2006). Intention, Meaning, and Substance in the Phenomenology of Abstract Painting. British Journal of Aesthetics 46 (1):38-58.
    Trying to make sense of abstract painting has resulted in interesting but often inexact and inadequately motivated efforts to characterize what is distinctive about modern art. The present account begins with Gertrude Stein's description of the fascination she experiences in viewing painted surfaces and proceeds through a number of efforts to justify or severely criticize abstract painting in relation to more traditional representational works. The basis for a phenomenology of abstract painting is suggested by James Elkins's first-person analysis of the (...)
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  37. Eileen John (2014). Meals, Art, and Artistic Value. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 51 (2):254-268.
    The notion of a meal is explored in relation to questions of art status and artistic value. Meals are argued not to be works of art, but to have the capacity for artistic value. These claims are used to respond to Dominic Lopes’s arguments in Beyond Art that demote artistic value in favour of the values that emerge from specific kinds of art. A conception of artistic value that involves ‘taking reflective charge’ of the possibilities for goodness available in an (...)
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  38. Michael Kelly (1998). Essentialism and Historicism in Danto's Philosophy of Art. History and Theory 37 (4):30–43.
    Arthur C. Danto has long defended essentialism in the philosophy of art, yet he has been interpreted by many as a historicist. This essentialism/historicism conflict in the interpretation of his work reflects the same conflict both within his thought and, more importantly, within modern art itself. Danto's strategy for resolving this conflict involves, among other things, a Bildungsroman of modern art failing to discover its essence, an essentialist definition of art provided by philosophy which is indemnified against history, and a (...)
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  39. Lucian Krukowski (1990). Artist-Work-Audience: Musings on Barthes and Tolstoy. British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (2):143-148.
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  40. Keith Lehrer (2004). Representation in Painting and in Consciousness. Philosophical Studies 117 (1-2):1-14.
  41. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2005). Altering Artworks. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):53-61.
    The grounds for recognizing that artists possess a personal “moral right of integrity” that would entitle them to prevent others from modifying their works are weak. There is, however, an important (and legislation-worthy) public interest in protecting highly-valued entities, including at least some works of art, from permanently destructive transformations.
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  42. Lawrence Lengbeyer (2005). Altering Artworks: Creators' Moral Rights Vs. The Public Good. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 12 (2):53-61.
    The grounds for recognizing that artists possess a personal “moral right of integrity” that would entitle them to prevent others from modifying their works are weak. There is, however, an important (and legislation-worthy) public interest in protecting highly-valued entities, including at least some works of art, from permanently destructive transformations.
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  43. Paisley Livingston (1996). From Work to Work. Philosophy and Literature 20 (2):436-454.
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  44. Dominic Mciver Lopes (2008). Reference, Ontology, and Architecture: Response to Rafael de Clercq. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (2):194–196.
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  45. Dominic Mciver Lopes (2007). Shikinen Sengu and the Ontology of Architecture in Japan. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 65 (1):77–84.
    Japan's Ise Jingu shrine has been taken down and rebuilt every twenty years for more than a millenium - a practice called "shikinen sengu." A standard ontology of architecture, according to which buildings are material particulars, implies that Ise Jingu is no more than twenty years old. However, a correct ontology of architecture is implicit in practices of architecture appreciation. The Japanese appreciation of Ise Jingu and other buildings in its architectural tradition implies both that it is no more than (...)
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  46. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). How to Frame Serial Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):261-265.
    Most artworks—or at least most among those standardly subject to philosophical scrutiny—appear to be singular, stand-alone works. However, some artworks (indeed, perhaps a good many) are by contrast best viewed in terms of some larger grouping or ordering of artworks. i.e., as a series. The operative art-theoretic notion of series in which I am interested here is that of an individual and distinct artwork that is itself non-trivially composed of a non-trivial sequence of artworks (e.g., Walter de Maria’s Statement Series, (...)
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  47. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). How to Frame Serial Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):261-265.
    Most artworks—or at least most among those standardly subject to philosophical scrutiny—appear to be singular, stand-alone works. However, some artworks (indeed, perhaps a good many) are by contrast best viewed in terms of some larger grouping or ordering of artworks. i.e., as a series. The operative art-theoretic notion of series in which I am interested here is that of an individual and distinct artwork that is itself non-trivially composed of a non-trivial sequence of artworks (e.g., Walter de Maria’s Statement Series, (...)
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  48. Christy Mag Uidhir (2010). Failed-Art and Failed Art-Theory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 88 (3):381-400.
    An object being non-art appears only trivially informative. Some non-art objects, however, could be saliently 'almost' art, and therefore objects for which being non-art is non-trivially informative. I call these kinds of non-art objects 'failed-art' objects—non-art objects aetiologically similar to art-objects, diverging only in virtue of some relevant failure. I take failed-art to be the right sort of thing, to result from the right sort of action, and to have the right sort of history required to be art, but to (...)
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  49. Christy Mag Uidhir (2009). Why Pornography Can't Be Art. Philosophy and Literature 33 (1):pp. 193-203.
    Claims that pornography cannot be art typically depend on controversial claims about essential value differences (moral, aesthetic) between pornography and art. In this paper, I offer a value-neutral exclusionary claim, showing pornography to be descriptively at odds with art. I then show how my view is an improvement on similar claims made by Jerrold Levinson. Finally I draw parallels between art and pornography and art and advertising as well as show that my view is consistent with our typical usage of (...)
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  50. Christy Mag Uidhir (2009). Unlimited Additions to Limited Editions. Contemporary Aesthetics 7.
    In this paper I target the relationship between two prints that are roughly qualitatively identical and share a causal history. Is one an artwork if and only if the other is an artwork? To answer this, I propose two competing principles. The first claims that certain intentional relations must be shared by the prints (e.g., editioned prints vs. non-editioned prints). The second, which I endorse, appeals only to minimal print ontology, claiming that the two prints need only be what I (...)
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