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Art and Artworks

Edited by Nicholas Riggle (University of San Diego)
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  1. Stephanie Adair (forthcoming). The Modality of Artistic Objects. Axiomathes:1-13.
    Nicolai Hartmann describes how artistic objects arise through the interplay between a material foreground and immaterial background. In this paper, I show how the layered structure also prevents the modal imbalance inherent in artistic objects from violating the intermodal laws of the real. The real law of intermodal implication specifies that real possibility cannot extend beyond real necessity. I begin by explicating the real intermodal laws and describing how they give the real sphere its characteristic narrowness and determinateness. Hartmann describes (...)
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  2. Thomas Adajian (2016). WOLTERSTORFF, NICHOLAS. Art Rethought: The Social Practices of Art. Oxford University Press, 2015, Xvi + 332 Pp., $50.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (4):415-418.
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  3. Sondra Bacharach (2015). Mag Uidhir, Christy. Art and Art‐Attempts. Oxford University Press, 2013, 232 Pp., 14 B&W Illus., $75.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):467-469.
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  4. Katerina Bantinaki (2016). Commissioning the Work: From Singular Authorship to Collective Creatorship. Journal of Aesthetic Education 50 (1):16-33.
    A specific type of collaboration has become prevalent in contemporary art: in this type of collaboration—henceforth, commissioning—an artist assigns the production of the work of art to skilled craftsmen or unskilled workers, directing their labor through instructions or blueprints. Commissioning has been accepted by the art world as a legitimate mode of artistic production—legitimate in the sense that it does not undermine the authenticity of the work as a creation of the artist, even if she has not laid a hand (...)
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  5. Jane Bennett (2015). Encounters with an Art-Thing. Evental Aesthetics 4 (1):71-87.
    FEATURED IN EVENTAL AESTHETICS RETROSPECTIVE 1. LOOKING BACK AT 10 ISSUES OF EVENTAL AESTHETICS. What kind of things are damaged art-objects? Are they junk, trash, mere stuff? Or do they remain art by virtue of their distinguished provenance or still discernible design? What kind of powers do such things have as material bodies and forces? Instead of attempting to locate proper concepts for salvaged art-things, this essay, from a perspective centered on the power of bodies-in-encounter – where “power” in Spinoza’s (...)
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  6. Mark Cheetham (1987). Umberto Eco, Art and Beauty in the Middle Ages. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 7:229-230.
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  7. Mark Coeckelbergh (2016). Can Machines Create Art? Philosophy and Technology:1-19.
    As machines take over more tasks previously done by humans, artistic creation is also considered as a candidate to be automated. But, can machines create art? This paper offers a conceptual framework for a philosophical discussion of this question regarding the status of machine art and machine creativity. It breaks the main question down in three sub-questions, and then analyses each question in order to arrive at more precise problems with regard to machine art and machine creativity: What is art (...)
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  8. Gianluca Consoli (2016). In Search of the Ontological Common Core of Artworks: Radical Embodiment and Non-Universalization. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (1):14-41.
    I propose that artworks represent a specific and homogeneous ontological kind, grounded in a common ontological core. I call this common core ‘non-universalizable embodied meaning’, and I argue that this common core explains how artworks unfold their ontological identity at the physical, intentional, and social levels on the basis of an original and irreducible mode of material embodiment and cultural emergence; this common core functions as the constitutive rule of art and institutes an axiological normativity, that is, normativity based on (...)
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  9. Regis A. Duffy (1998). Seeable Signs: The Iconography of the Seven Sacraments 1350-1544 by Ann Eljenholm Nichols. Franciscan Studies 55 (1):362-366.
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  10. K. E. Gover (2015). Ambivalent Agency: A Response to Trogdon and Livingston on Artwork Completion. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):457-460.
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  11. Harry B. Gutman (1944). Nicholas of Lyra and Michelangelo’s Ancestors of Christ. Franciscan Studies 4 (3):223-228.
  12. Garry L. Hagberg (2016). Word and Object: Museums and the Matter of Meaning. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:261-293.
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  13. Victoria S. Harrison, Anna Bergqvist & Gary Kemp (2016). Introduction. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:1-12.
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  14. Sarah Hegenbart (2016). The Participatory Art Museum: Approached From a Philosophical Perspective. Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 79:319-339.
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  15. Peter Lamarque (2016). Reflections on the Ethics and Aesthetics of Restoration and Conservation. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (3):281-299.
    This paper looks at some of the principles behind restoration and conservation applied to ancient artefacts and architecture. A number of case studies are discussed, from medieval stained glass to buildings that have been damaged by fire. The paper ends with some remarks about the conservation of ruins. Underlying the discussion are questions about the kinds of obligations—both ethical and aesthetic—that might constrain the practices of restoration: what ought and ought not to be done in particular cases and how such (...)
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  16. P. Leon (1924). Æsthetic Knowledge. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 25:199 - 208.
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  17. Richard A. Leson (2012). The Devout Belief of the Imagination. The Paris Meditationes Vitae Christi and Female Franciscan Spirituality in Trecento Italy. Disciplina Monastica 6 (Review). Franciscan Studies 69 (1):509-511.
    In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content:Holly Flora’s published dissertation is a critical contribution to scholarship of the origins of the Meditationes Vitae Christi, a text strongly associated with the preaching and prayer habits of the early Franciscan order and perhaps the most representative example of the late-Medieval devotional and pictorial phenomenon often summarized as the “Vita Christi tradition.” For almost a century, art historians have invoked the MVC to explain iconographic innovations in late-Medieval (...)
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  18. Oliver Mathieu (2015). Beyond Mere Conjectures: Young’s Method of Original Composition. British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (4):465-479.
    Frequently quoted in the context of contemporary philosophical reflections on ‘artistic creativity’, Edward Young’s Conjectures on Original Composition are generally read as articulating an anti‐traditionalist account of genius. Against this reading, I argue that Young does not reject the value of traditional models and conventions, but rather means to insist on the artist’s capacity to determine such values through her natural capacity for autonomous critical thinking. I support this claim by showing how he draws from Neo‐Platonism and the experimental philosophy (...)
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  19. Annelies Monseré (2016). Why We Need a Theory of Art. Estetika: The Central European Journal of Aesthetics 53 (2):165-183.
    In this article, I argue against Dominic McIver Lopes’s claim that nobody needs a theory of art. On the one hand, I will demonstrate that Lopes’s alternative to theories of art – namely, the buck-passing theory of art – is neither more viable nor more fruitful: it is likewise incapable of resolving disagreement over the status of certain artefacts and of being fruitful for the broader field of the arts. On the other hand, I will defend the view that we (...)
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  20. Michael Morris (1988). Umberto Eco: "Art and Beauty in the Middle Ages". [REVIEW] The Thomist 52 (1):181.
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  21. Linda Neagley (1990). Religious Art in France: The Late Middle Ages. A Study of Medieval Iconography and Its Sources. [REVIEW] Speculum 65 (1):192-194.
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  22. Alex Neill & Aaron Ridley (2016). Still an Error: Relational Theories of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (2):187-189.
    Aaron Meskin and Simon Fokt have recently taken issue with our 2012 paper, ‘Relational Theories of Art: the History of an Error’. Here we respond to their objections.
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  23. Sandra Saenz-Lopez Perez (2013). Coloring the Middle Ages: Textual and Graphical Sources That Reveal the Importance of Color in Medieval Sculpture. In Andreas Speer (ed.), Zwischen Kunsthandwerk Und Kunst: Die ,Schedula Diversarum Artium'. De Gruyter 274-287.
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  24. Sue Spaid (2016). Revisiting Ventzislavov's Thesis: “Curating Should Be Understood as a Fine Art”. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):87-91.
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  25. Richard Stopford (2016). Preserving the Restoration of the Pietà. British Journal of Aesthetics 56 (3):301-315.
    In this paper, I consider Mark Sagoff’s well-known discussion of the restoration of Michelangelo’s Pietà. Provocatively, he argues that the Pietà should not have been restored to its undamaged state after it was attacked. I argue that Sagoff is mistaken in this. His analysis of restoration is a result of his working view of the Pietà’s identity. Using a modal analysis of counterfactual damage to the Pietà, I argue that the notion of identity at work in his view is deeply (...)
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  26. Rossen Ventzislavov (2016). The Curator as Artist: Reply to Sue Spaid. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):91-95.
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  27. Michel‐Antoine Xhignesse (2016). Andina, Tiziana. The Philosophy of Art: The Question of Definition—From Hegel to Post‐Dantian Theories, Trans. Natalia Iacobelli, New York: Bloomsbury, 2013, 190 Pp., 5 B&W Illus., $37.95 Paperback, $120.00 Cloth. [REVIEW] Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):106-108.
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Artworks
  1. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (ed.) (1976). Culture and Art: An Anthology. Humanities Press.
    Danto, A. The artworld.--Dickie, G. What is art?--Margolis, J. Works of art are physically embodied and culturally emergent entities.--Kjørup, S. Art broadly and wholly conceived.--Meyer, L. B. Forgery and the anthropology of art.--Brunius, T. Theory and ideologies in aesthetics.--Tilghman, B. R. Artistic puzzlement.--Binkley, T. Deciding about art.--Alexander, H. G. On defining in aesthetics.--Iseminger, G. Appreciation, the artworld, and the aesthetic.--Glickman, J. Creativity in the arts.--Sclafani, R. The theory of art.--Lyas, C. Danto and Dickie on art.--Beardsley, M. C. Is art essentially (...)
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  2. Catharine Abell (2015). II—Genre, Interpretation and Evaluation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (1pt1):25-40.
    The genre to which an artwork belongs affects how it is to be interpreted and evaluated. An account of genre and of the criteria for genre membership should explain these interpretative and evaluative effects. Contrary to conceptions of genres as categories distinguished by the features of the works that belong to them, I argue that these effects are to be explained by conceiving of genres as categories distinguished by certain of the purposes that the works belonging to them are intended (...)
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  3. T. Adajian (2008). Subjects and Objects: Art, Essentialism, and Abstraction. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):356-357.
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  4. Emmanuel Alloa (2013). Kunst. Werkästhetik als Ereignisästhetik. In Dieter Thomä (ed.), Heidegger-Handbuch: Leben - Werk – Wirkung. Metzler 315-319.
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  5. Emmanuel Alloa (2011). Restitutionen. Wiedergaben des 'Ursprungs des Kunstwerks' in der französischen Philosophie. In David Espinet & Tobias Keiling (eds.), eideggers 'Ursprung des Kunstwerks'. Klostermann 261-276.
  6. F. Antal (1952). The Moral Purpose of Hogarth's Art. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 15 (3/4):169-197.
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  7. Daniel Arenas (2001). Schaeffer, Jean-Marie. Art of the Modern Age: Philosophy of Art From Kant to Heidegger. Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):942-943.
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  8. A. B. (1963). Zen in Japanese Art-A Way of Spiritual Experience. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):801-801.
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  9. Sondra Bacharach & Deborah Tollefsen (2015). Co‐Authorship, Multiple Authorship, and Posthumous Authorship: A Reply to Hick. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):331-334.
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  10. Jay E. Bachrach (1973). Richard Wollheim and the Work of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (1):108-111.
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  11. George Bailey (1989). Amateurs Imitate, Professionals Steal. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (3):221-227.
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  12. James Baird (1957). Creating Art. Review of Metaphysics 11 (1):108 - 121.
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  13. Gary Banham (2002). Mapplethorpe, Duchamp and the Ends of Photography. Angelaki 7 (1):119-128.
    This paper presents an argument for seeing Marcel Duchamp and Robert Mapplethorpe as opposite ends of a tradition of negotiation of art with its conditions of production. The piece takes seriously Kant's suggestions concerning the fine arts and contests views of art that see the Kantian tradition as formally fixed.
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  14. Andrew Benjamin (2015). Art's Philosophical Work. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    World-leading philosopher Andrew Benjamin presents a radically new materialist philosophy of art and a rethinking of the history of art in that context.
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  15. Jane Bennett (2015). Encounters with an Art-Thing. Evental Aesthetics 3 (3):91-110.
    What kind of things are damaged art-objects? Are they junk, trash, mere stuff? Or do they remain art by virtue of their distinguished provenance or still discernible design? What kind of powers do such things have as material bodies and forces? Instead of attempting to locate proper concepts for salvaged art-things, this essay, from a perspective centered on the power of bodies-in-encounter – where “power” in Spinoza’s sense is the capacity to affect and be affected – attempts to home in (...)
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  16. Alessandro Bertinetto (2006). Arte como desrealización. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 39:175-185.
    The paper recognizes the failure of contemporary non-aesthetic theories of art and aims at recovering the phenomenological notion of derealization – which re-emerges in A. Dantoʼs idea of the ʻbracketting effectʼ of art –, in order to explain art and art-experience. The main point is that art makes us free from the ʻreal worldʼ through an act of derealization that leads to the establishment of possible or fictional worlds different from the one we live in. Artworks are primarly imaginary, unreal (...)
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  17. Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
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  18. Antoon Braeckman (2004). From the Work of Art to Absolute Reason. Review of Metaphysics 57 (3):551 - 569.
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  19. John B. Brough (2006). The Paradoxes of Art. Review of Metaphysics 59 (4):895-897.
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  20. Mabs Buck (2002). A Theory of Art. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2).
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  21. V. C. C. (1957). The Mirror of Art. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):535-535.
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  22. V. C. C. (1956). The Dehumanization of Art and Other Writings on Art and Culture. Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):182-182.
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  23. Tomás N. Castro (2015). Uma topografia poética e estética em António Dacosta. Revista de História da Arte 12:266-277.
    This work departs from Beardsley’s critique to the intentional fallacy, in order to introduce the concept of artist’s concerns, extrinsic to works but manifest in them. Then, we will describe António Dacosta’s (1914-1990) unique career, considering topography the main poetical and aesthetic value for some works of the period 1984-1990. And, although they seem to depict islands, we will argue that Dacosta depicted insularity in an unparalleled way. -/- Este trabalho parte da crítica de Beardsley à falácia intencional para propor (...)
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1 — 50 / 534