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Art and Artworks

Edited by Nicholas Riggle (New York University)
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  1. F. E. B. (1959). Pagan Mysteries in the Renaissance. Review of Metaphysics 12 (3):496-496.
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  2. Colin Chamberlain (2007). Arts and Minds. Review of Metaphysics 60 (4):860-861.
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  3. Francis J. Coleman (1964). Liking and Approving of a Work of Art. Review of Metaphysics 17 (4):568 - 576.
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  4. G. D. D. (1964). The Heaven of Invention. Review of Metaphysics 17 (3):474-474.
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  5. G. D. D. (1963). Art and Existentialism. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):800-800.
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  6. Daniel Dahlstrom (1987). Panofsky and the Foundations of Art History. Review of Metaphysics 40 (3):579-580.
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  7. Louis Dupré (1975). The Enigma of Religious Art. Review of Metaphysics 29 (1):27 - 44.
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  8. Jonathan Goldberg (1976). Quattrocento Dematerialization: Some Paradoxes in a Conceptual Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 35 (2):153-168.
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  9. Sherri Irvin (2003). Work and Object: The Artist's Sanction in Contemporary Art. Dissertation, Princeton University
    Is an artwork simply identical to some physical object? While clearly not viable for art forms like literature and music, the view that artworks are physical objects is appealing for the singular visual arts , since it accords with our intuitions about the nature of visual artworks. A traditional challenge to the view holds that physical objects cannot possess representational properties, and thus visual artworks, most of which do have such properties, cannot be identical to physical objects. In chapter 1 (...)
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  10. R. L. J. (1961). O Nekotorykh Osobennostjakh Khudozhestvennogo Otrazhenija Dejstvitel' Nosti (On Certain Special Aspects of the Reflection of Reality in Art.). Review of Metaphysics 14 (4):723-723.
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  11. Peter Martin Jaworski (2013). In Defense of Fakes and Artistic Treason: Why Visually-Indistinguishable Duplicates of Paintings Are Just as Good as the Originals. [REVIEW] Journal of Value Inquiry 47 (4):391-405.
    I argue that all that is relevant to appreciating art as art is the "abstract entity that is the work of art." The object of aesthetic contemplation, the bearer of aesthetic value, just is this abstract entity picked out by the sortal concept 'work of art,' which requires some vehicle but does not require the particular vehicle that is the original painting. Since this is so, the work of art is present in a visually-indistinguishable duplicate to the same extent and (...)
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  12. Tobias Keiling (2011). Kunst, Werk, Wahrheit. Heideggers Wahrheitstheorie in Der Ursprung des Kunstwerkes. In David Espinet & Tobias Keiling (eds.), Heideggers Ursprung des Kunstwerkes. Ein kooperativer Kommentar. Klostermann. 66-95.
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  13. Wang Keping (2008). The Theory of Art as Sedimentation. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 36:159-182.
    For so long a time it has been getting increasingly formidable, if not possible, to define art in general ever since the advent of the so-called “found art” or “ready-mades” of Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol, among other avant-garde or pop artists. But this does not have too much constraint over some philosophers who have made persistent attempts in this regard. What have turned out to be considerably influential are the “artworld” framed by Arthur C. Danto and the “institutional theory” (...)
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  14. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). How to Frame Serial Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (3):261-265.
    Most artworks—or at least most among those standardly subject to philosophical scrutiny—appear to be singular, stand-alone works. However, some artworks (indeed, perhaps a good many) are by contrast best viewed in terms of some larger grouping or ordering of artworks. i.e., as a series. The operative art-theoretic notion of series in which I am interested here is that of an individual and distinct artwork that is itself non-trivially composed of a non-trivial sequence of artworks (e.g., Walter de Maria’s Statement Series, (...)
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  15. Carl Matheson & Ben Caplan (2009). Modality, Individuation, and the Ontology of Art. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 38 (4):491-517.
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  16. Annelies Monseré (2012). Non-Western Art and the Concept of Art: Can Cluster Theories of Art Account for the Universality of Art? Estetika 49 (2):148-165.
    This essay seeks to demonstrate that there are no compelling reasons to exclude non-Western artefacts from the domain of art. Any theory of art must therefore account for the universality of the concept of art. It cannot simply start from ‘our’ art traditions and extend these conceptions to other cultures, since this would imply cultural appropriation, nor can it resolve the matter simply by formulating separate criteria for non-Western art, since this would imply that there is no unity in the (...)
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  17. José Ortega Y. Gasset (2009). Over kunstkritiek. Nexus 52:123-128.
    In een tafelrede, uitgesproken in 1925, wijst de Spaanse filosoof José Ortega y Gasset zijn vriend, kunstcriticus Juan de la Encina, op de problemen waar een criticus voor komt te staan in de moderne tijd. De criticus heeft niet langer de beschikking over een vaste code aan de hand waarvan hij de kwaliteit van een kunstwerk kan bepalen. In plaats daarvan ziet hij zich geconfronteerd met een verandering die zich in de opvattingen van de mensen heeft voorgedaan. In de huidige (...)
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  18. José Ortega Y. Gasset (2007). La Deshumanización Del Arte. Espasa.
    Ligado directamente a la dinámica de los movimientos renovadores del arte que surgieron en la España de los años veinte, el texto de Ortega y Gasset ofrece unas perspectivas más amplias y entronca con la renovación de la estética y la historia del arte que había iniciado la tradición teórica e historiográfica alemana a finales del siglo XIX. Ofrecemos, además otros escritos que, como «¿Una exposición Zuloaga?», «La Gioconda», «Diálogo sobre el arte nuevo», «Ensayo de estética a manera de prólogo» (...)
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  19. Peter Schwenger (2006). The Tears of Things: Melancholy and Physical Objects. Univ of Minnesota Press.
    Concerned in part with the act of collecting, The Tears of Things is itself a collection of exemplary art objects—literary and cultural attempts to control and possess things—including paintings by Georgia O’Keeffe and René Magritte; ...
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  20. R. Stecker (forthcoming). Beyond Art. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayu041.
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  21. Robert Stecker (forthcoming). Beyond Art. British Journal of Aesthetics:ayu041.
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  22. Robert Stecker (2001). Artworks. Mind 110 (438):565-569.
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  23. Kelly Trogdon & Paisley Livingston (forthcoming). Artwork Completion: A Response to Gover. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
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  24. Nicholas Wolterstorff (1985). Art In Realist Perspective. Idealistic Studies 15 (2):87-99.
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Artworks
  1. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (ed.) (1976). Culture and Art: An Anthology. Humanities Press.
    Danto, A. The artworld.--Dickie, G. What is art?--Margolis, J. Works of art are physically embodied and culturally emergent entities.--Kjørup, S. Art broadly and wholly conceived.--Meyer, L. B. Forgery and the anthropology of art.--Brunius, T. Theory and ideologies in aesthetics.--Tilghman, B. R. Artistic puzzlement.--Binkley, T. Deciding about art.--Alexander, H. G. On defining in aesthetics.--Iseminger, G. Appreciation, the artworld, and the aesthetic.--Glickman, J. Creativity in the arts.--Sclafani, R. The theory of art.--Lyas, C. Danto and Dickie on art.--Beardsley, M. C. Is art essentially (...)
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  2. T. Adajian (2008). Subjects and Objects: Art, Essentialism, and Abstraction. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):356-357.
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  3. F. Antal (1952). The Moral Purpose of Hogarth's Art. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 15 (3/4):169-197.
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  4. Daniel Arenas (2001). Schaeffer, Jean-Marie. Art of the Modern Age: Philosophy of Art From Kant to Heidegger. Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):942-943.
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  5. A. B. (1963). Zen in Japanese Art-A Way of Spiritual Experience. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):801-801.
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  6. Jay E. Bachrach (1973). Richard Wollheim and the Work of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (1):108-111.
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  7. George Bailey (1989). Amateurs Imitate, Professionals Steal. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (3):221-227.
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  8. Gary Banham (2002). Mapplethorpe, Duchamp and the Ends of Photography. Angelaki 7 (1):119-128.
    This paper presents an argument for seeing Marcel Duchamp and Robert Mapplethorpe as opposite ends of a tradition of negotiation of art with its conditions of production. The piece takes seriously Kant's suggestions concerning the fine arts and contests views of art that see the Kantian tradition as formally fixed.
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  9. Andrew Benjamin (2015). Art's Philosophical Work. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    World-leading philosopher Andrew Benjamin presents a radically new materialist philosophy of art and a rethinking of the history of art in that context.
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  10. Jane Bennett (2015). Encounters with an Art-Thing. Evental Aesthetics 3 (3):91-110.
    What kind of things are damaged art-objects? Are they junk, trash, mere stuff? Or do they remain art by virtue of their distinguished provenance or still discernible design? What kind of powers do such things have as material bodies and forces? Instead of attempting to locate proper concepts for salvaged art-things, this essay, from a perspective centered on the power of bodies-in-encounter – where “power” in Spinoza’s sense is the capacity to affect and be affected – attempts to home in (...)
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  11. Alessandro Bertinetto (2006). Arte como desrealización. Daimon 39:175-185.
    The paper recognizes the failure of contemporary non-aesthetic theories of art and aims at recovering the phenomenological notion of derealization – which re-emerges in A. Dantoʼs idea of the ʻbracketting effectʼ of art –, in order to explain art and art-experience. The main point is that art makes us free from the ʻreal worldʼ through an act of derealization that leads to the establishment of possible or fictional worlds different from the one we live in. Artworks are primarly imaginary, unreal (...)
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  12. Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
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  13. Antoon Braeckman (2004). From the Work of Art to Absolute Reason. Review of Metaphysics 57 (3):551 - 569.
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  14. John B. Brough (2006). The Paradoxes of Art. Review of Metaphysics 59 (4):895-897.
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  15. Mabs Buck (2002). A Theory of Art. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2).
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  16. V. C. C. (1957). On Painting. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):534-534.
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  17. V. C. C. (1957). On Painting. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):534-534.
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  18. V. C. C. (1957). The Mirror of Art. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):535-535.
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  19. V. C. C. (1956). The Dehumanization of Art and Other Writings on Art and Culture. Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):182-182.
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  20. B. Cooke (2011). Work and Object: Explorations in the Metaphysics of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (4):443-446.
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  21. Rafael De Clercq (2013). The Metaphysics of Art Restoration. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):261-275.
    Art restorations often give rise to controversy, and the reason does not always seem to be a lack of skill or dedication on the side of the restorer. Rather, in some of the most famous cases, the reason seems to be a lack of agreement on basic principles. In particular, there seems to be a lack of agreement on how the following two questions are to be answered. First, what is art restoration supposed to achieve, in other words, what is (...)
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  22. John Dilworth (2008). The Abstractness of Artworks and Its Implications for Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):341-353.
    Artworks have at least some necessary content properties, as do abstract entities such as propositions. But no concrete item, whether an object, event, process etc., could have any necessary content property. So no artwork could be identical with a concrete item. Hence artworks must be abstract. I also argue that artworks are only contingently connected with concrete items, just as propositions are only contingently linked to their linguistic tokens.
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  23. John Dilworth (2007). In Support of Content Theories of Art. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):19 – 39.
    A content theory of art would identify an artwork with the meaningful or representational content of some concrete artistic vehicle, such as the intentional, expressive, stylistic, and subject matter-related content embodied in, or resulting from, acts of intentional artistic expression by artists. Perhaps surprisingly, the resultant view that an artwork is nothing but content seems to have been without theoretical defenders until very recently, leaving a significant theoretical gap in the literature. I present some basic arguments in defence of such (...)
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  24. John Dilworth (2005). The Double Content of Art. Prometheus Books.
    The Double Content view is the first comprehensive theory of art that is able to satisfactorily explain the nature of all kinds of artworks in a unified way — whether paintings, novels, or musical and theatrical performances. The basic thesis is that all such representational artworks involve two levels or kinds of representation: a first stage in which a concrete artifact represents an artwork, and a second stage in which that artwork in turn represents its subject matter. "Dilworth applies his (...)
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  25. John Dilworth (2003). Ariadne at the Movies. Contemporary Aesthetics 1 (1).
    ABSTRACT -/- Films are usually assumed to be types, with their templates or performances being tokens of those types. However, I give a counter-example in which two different films are simultaneously made by different directors, with the outcome of this process being a single template length of film which, I claim, embodies both of those films. But no two types could thus have a token in common, and hence type views of films must be incorrect. I further explain and defend (...)
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  26. J. Dodd (2012). Defending the Discovery Model in the Ontology of Art: A Reply to Amie Thomasson on the Qua Problem. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (1):75-95.
    According to the discovery model in the ontology of art, the facts concerning the ontological status of artworks are mind-independent and, hence, are facts about which the folk may be substantially ignorant or in error. In recent work Amie Thomasson has claimed that the most promising solution to the ‘ qua problem’—a problem concerning how the reference of a referring-expression is fixed—requires us to give up the discovery model. I argue that this claim is false. Thomasson's solution to the qua (...)
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