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  1. Lars Aagaard-Mogensen (ed.) (1976). Culture and Art: An Anthology. Humanities Press.
    Danto, A. The artworld.--Dickie, G. What is art?--Margolis, J. Works of art are physically embodied and culturally emergent entities.--Kjørup, S. Art broadly and wholly conceived.--Meyer, L. B. Forgery and the anthropology of art.--Brunius, T. Theory and ideologies in aesthetics.--Tilghman, B. R. Artistic puzzlement.--Binkley, T. Deciding about art.--Alexander, H. G. On defining in aesthetics.--Iseminger, G. Appreciation, the artworld, and the aesthetic.--Glickman, J. Creativity in the arts.--Sclafani, R. The theory of art.--Lyas, C. Danto and Dickie on art.--Beardsley, M. C. Is art essentially (...)
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  2. Catharine Abell (2015). II—Genre, Interpretation and Evaluation. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 115 (1pt1):25-40.
    The genre to which an artwork belongs affects how it is to be interpreted and evaluated. An account of genre and of the criteria for genre membership should explain these interpretative and evaluative effects. Contrary to conceptions of genres as categories distinguished by the features of the works that belong to them, I argue that these effects are to be explained by conceiving of genres as categories distinguished by certain of the purposes that the works belonging to them are intended (...)
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  3. T. Adajian (2008). Subjects and Objects: Art, Essentialism, and Abstraction. British Journal of Aesthetics 48 (3):356-357.
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  4. Emmanuel Alloa (2013). Kunst. Werkästhetik als Ereignisästhetik. In Dieter Thomä (ed.), Heidegger-Handbuch: Leben - Werk – Wirkung. Metzler 315-319.
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  5. Emmanuel Alloa (2011). Restitutionen. Wiedergaben des 'Ursprungs des Kunstwerks' in der französischen Philosophie. In David Espinet & Tobias Keiling (eds.), eideggers 'Ursprung des Kunstwerks'. Klostermann 261-276.
  6. F. Antal (1952). The Moral Purpose of Hogarth's Art. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 15 (3/4):169-197.
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  7. Daniel Arenas (2001). Schaeffer, Jean-Marie. Art of the Modern Age: Philosophy of Art From Kant to Heidegger. Review of Metaphysics 54 (4):942-943.
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  8. A. B. (1963). Zen in Japanese Art-A Way of Spiritual Experience. Review of Metaphysics 16 (4):801-801.
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  9. Sondra Bacharach & Deborah Tollefsen (2015). Co‐Authorship, Multiple Authorship, and Posthumous Authorship: A Reply to Hick. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):331-334.
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  10. Jay E. Bachrach (1973). Richard Wollheim and the Work of Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 32 (1):108-111.
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  11. George Bailey (1989). Amateurs Imitate, Professionals Steal. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (3):221-227.
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  12. James Baird (1957). Creating Art. Review of Metaphysics 11 (1):108 - 121.
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  13. Gary Banham (2002). Mapplethorpe, Duchamp and the Ends of Photography. Angelaki 7 (1):119-128.
    This paper presents an argument for seeing Marcel Duchamp and Robert Mapplethorpe as opposite ends of a tradition of negotiation of art with its conditions of production. The piece takes seriously Kant's suggestions concerning the fine arts and contests views of art that see the Kantian tradition as formally fixed.
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  14. Andrew Benjamin (2015). Art's Philosophical Work. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    World-leading philosopher Andrew Benjamin presents a radically new materialist philosophy of art and a rethinking of the history of art in that context.
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  15. Jane Bennett (2015). Encounters with an Art-Thing. Evental Aesthetics 3 (3):91-110.
    What kind of things are damaged art-objects? Are they junk, trash, mere stuff? Or do they remain art by virtue of their distinguished provenance or still discernible design? What kind of powers do such things have as material bodies and forces? Instead of attempting to locate proper concepts for salvaged art-things, this essay, from a perspective centered on the power of bodies-in-encounter – where “power” in Spinoza’s sense is the capacity to affect and be affected – attempts to home in (...)
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  16. Alessandro Bertinetto (2006). Arte como desrealización. Daimon: Revista de Filosofia 39:175-185.
    The paper recognizes the failure of contemporary non-aesthetic theories of art and aims at recovering the phenomenological notion of derealization – which re-emerges in A. Dantoʼs idea of the ʻbracketting effectʼ of art –, in order to explain art and art-experience. The main point is that art makes us free from the ʻreal worldʼ through an act of derealization that leads to the establishment of possible or fictional worlds different from the one we live in. Artworks are primarly imaginary, unreal (...)
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  17. Ronald Bogue (2003). Deleuze on Music, Painting, and the Arts. Routledge.
    Bogue provides a systematic overview and introduction to Deleuze's writings on music and painting, and an assessment of their position within his aesthetics as a whole. Deleuze on Music, Painting and the Arts breaks new ground in the scholarship on Deleuze's aesthetics, while providing a clear and accessible guide to his often overlooked writings in the fields of music and painting.
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  18. Antoon Braeckman (2004). From the Work of Art to Absolute Reason. Review of Metaphysics 57 (3):551 - 569.
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  19. John B. Brough (2006). The Paradoxes of Art. Review of Metaphysics 59 (4):895-897.
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  20. Mabs Buck (2002). A Theory of Art. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (2).
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  21. V. C. C. (1957). The Mirror of Art. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):535-535.
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  22. V. C. C. (1957). On Painting. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):534-534.
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  23. V. C. C. (1957). On Painting. Review of Metaphysics 10 (3):534-534.
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  24. V. C. C. (1956). The Dehumanization of Art and Other Writings on Art and Culture. Review of Metaphysics 10 (1):182-182.
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  25. Tomás N. Castro (2015). Uma topografia poética e estética em António Dacosta. Revista de História da Arte 12:266-277.
    This work departs from Beardsley’s critique to the intentional fallacy, in order to introduce the concept of artist’s concerns, extrinsic to works but manifest in them. Then, we will describe António Dacosta’s (1914-1990) unique career, considering topography the main poetical and aesthetic value for some works of the period 1984-1990. And, although they seem to depict islands, we will argue that Dacosta depicted insularity in an unparalleled way. -/- Este trabalho parte da crítica de Beardsley à falácia intencional para propor (...)
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  26. Tomás N. Castro (2013). Um Corpo em Presença. Uma Aproximação a Marina Abramović. Philosophica 42:189-198.
    Describing some of Marina Abramović’s performances, this essay aims to provide one possible philosophical framework in what concerns this form of art. The scope of presence in Abramović is enlighten by employing some vocabulary from a certain body poetics into the embodiment reflection, and ontological issues in performance come out when thinking about re-performance possibilities.
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  27. Francis J. Coleman (1964). Liking and Approving of a Work of Art. Review of Metaphysics 17 (4):568 - 576.
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  28. B. Cooke (2011). Work and Object: Explorations in the Metaphysics of Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (4):443-446.
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  29. Wesley D. Cray (2015). Yellowism and Ontology: A Skeptical Analysis. Contemporary Aesthetics 13.
    When Vladimir Umanets entered the Tate Modern on October 7, 2012 and defaced Rothko's Black on Maroon, he was operating, not as an artist or a vandal, but as a Yellowist. Yellowism is neither art nor anti-art but is instead a supposedly new cultural element that exists for its own sake and is about nothing but the color yellow. It might be tempting to write Yellowism and the Rothko defacement off as a mere prank or as pseudo-intellectual fraud, but I (...)
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  30. Rafael De Clercq (2013). The Metaphysics of Art Restoration. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (3):261-275.
    Art restorations often give rise to controversy, and the reason does not always seem to be a lack of skill or dedication on the side of the restorer. Rather, in some of the most famous cases, the reason seems to be a lack of agreement on basic principles. In particular, there seems to be a lack of agreement on how the following two questions are to be answered. First, what is art restoration supposed to achieve, in other words, what is (...)
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  31. John Dilworth (2008). The Abstractness of Artworks and Its Implications for Aesthetics. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):341-353.
    Artworks have at least some necessary content properties, as do abstract entities such as propositions. But no concrete item, whether an object, event, process etc., could have any necessary content property. So no artwork could be identical with a concrete item. Hence artworks must be abstract. I also argue that artworks are only contingently connected with concrete items, just as propositions are only contingently linked to their linguistic tokens.
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  32. John Dilworth (2007). In Support of Content Theories of Art. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 85 (1):19 – 39.
    A content theory of art would identify an artwork with the meaningful or representational content of some concrete artistic vehicle, such as the intentional, expressive, stylistic, and subject matter-related content embodied in, or resulting from, acts of intentional artistic expression by artists. Perhaps surprisingly, the resultant view that an artwork is nothing but content seems to have been without theoretical defenders until very recently, leaving a significant theoretical gap in the literature. I present some basic arguments in defence of such (...)
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  33. John Dilworth (2005). The Double Content of Art. Prometheus Books.
    The Double Content view is the first comprehensive theory of art that is able to satisfactorily explain the nature of all kinds of artworks in a unified way — whether paintings, novels, or musical and theatrical performances. The basic thesis is that all such representational artworks involve two levels or kinds of representation: a first stage in which a concrete artifact represents an artwork, and a second stage in which that artwork in turn represents its subject matter. "Dilworth applies his (...)
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  34. John Dilworth (2003). Ariadne at the Movies. Contemporary Aesthetics 1 (1).
    ABSTRACT -/- Films are usually assumed to be types, with their templates or performances being tokens of those types. However, I give a counter-example in which two different films are simultaneously made by different directors, with the outcome of this process being a single template length of film which, I claim, embodies both of those films. But no two types could thus have a token in common, and hence type views of films must be incorrect. I further explain and defend (...)
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  35. J. Dodd (2012). Defending the Discovery Model in the Ontology of Art: A Reply to Amie Thomasson on the Qua Problem. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (1):75-95.
    According to the discovery model in the ontology of art, the facts concerning the ontological status of artworks are mind-independent and, hence, are facts about which the folk may be substantially ignorant or in error. In recent work Amie Thomasson has claimed that the most promising solution to the ‘ qua problem’—a problem concerning how the reference of a referring-expression is fixed—requires us to give up the discovery model. I argue that this claim is false. Thomasson's solution to the qua (...)
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  36. J. Dodd (2012). Work and Object: Explorations in the Metaphysics of Art, by Peter Lamarque. Mind 121 (484):1088-1095.
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  37. Julian Dodd (2013). Adventures in the Metaontology of Art: Local Descriptivism, Artefacts and Dreamcatchers. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 165 (3):1047-1068.
    Descriptivism in the ontology of art is the thesis that the correct ontological proposal for a kind of artwork cannot show the nascent ontological conception of such things embedded in our critical and appreciative practices to be substantially mistaken. Descriptivists believe that the kinds of revisionary art ontological proposals propounded by Nelson Goodman, Gregory Currie, Mark Sagoff, and me are methodologically misconceived. In this paper I examine the case that has been made for a local form of descriptivism in the (...)
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  38. Andreas Dorschel (2005). Über das Verstehen und Interpretieren von Kunstwerken. In Wolf-Jürgen Cramm, Wulf Kellerwessel, David Krause & Hans-Christoph Kupfer (eds.), Diskurs und Reflexion. Wolfgang Kuhlmann zum 65. Geburtstag. Königshausen & Neumann 375-387.
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  39. Denis Dutton, Han Van Meegeren.
    The most notorious and celebrated forger of the twentieth century, Han van Meegeren (1889-1947), was born in the Dutch town of Deventer. He was fascinated by drawing as a child, and pursued it despite his father’s disapproval, sometimes spending all his pocket money on art supplies. In high school he was able finally to receive professional instruction, and went on to study architecture, according to his father’s wishes. In 1911 he married Anna de Voogt. His artistic talents were recognized when (...)
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  40. Andreas Elpidorou (2010). Imagination in Non-Representational Painting. In Jonathan Webber (ed.), Reading Sartre: On Phenomenology and Existentialism. Routledge
  41. C. E. Emmer (2013). 9/11 as Schmaltz-Attractor: A Coda on the Significance of Kitsch. In Monica Kjellman-Chapin (ed.), Kitsch: History, Theory, Practice. Cambridge Scholars Publishing 184-224.
    "The concluding chapter, penned by C. E. Emmer, both revisits and greatly expands upon disputations within the contested territory of kitsch as term and tool in cultural turf-war arsenals. Focusing on debates surrounding two visual responses to the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001, Dennis Madalone's 2003 music video for the patriotic anthem 'America We Stand As One' and Jenny Ryan's 'plushie' sculpture, 'Soft 9/11,' Emmer utilizes these debates to reveal the coexisting and competing attitudes towards ostensibly kitschy objects and (...)
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  42. Simon J. Evnine (2013). Ready-Mades: Ontology and Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 53 (4):407-423.
    I explore the interrelations between the ontological and aesthetic issues raised by ready-mades such as Duchamp’s Fountain. I outline a hylomorphic metaphysics which has two central features. First, hylomorphically complex objects have matter to which they are not identical. Secondly, when such objects are artefacts (including artworks), it is essential to them that they are the products of creative work on their matter. Against this background, I suggest that ready-mades are of aesthetic interest because they pose a dilemma. Is there (...)
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  43. Simon Fokt (2013). A Proposal for a Dualistic Ontology of Art. Sztuka I Filozofia (42):29-47.
    While pluralism in ontology of art improves on various monistic views, through its eclectic approach it lost a lot of their simplicity, parsimony, unity and intuitiveness. The dualistic theory presented in this paper offers an alternative – it shares the advantages of the monistic views while retaining the wide scope of pluralism, and thus should be preferred for methodological reasons. On this view all artworks are at the same time abstract universals which are called recipes, and particular physical objects – (...)
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  44. Simon Fokt (2012). Pornographic Art - A Case From Definitions. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (3):287-300.
    On the whole, neither those who hold that pornography can never be art nor their opponents specify what they actually mean by ‘art’, even though it seems natural that their conclusions should vary depending on how the concept is understood. This paper offers a ‘definitional crossword’ and confronts some definitions of pornography with the currently most well-established definitions of art. My discussion shows that following any of the modern definitions entails that at least some pornography not only can be, but (...)
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  45. Dustin Garlitz (2014). Avant-Garde. In Sherwood Thompson (ed.), Encyclopedia of Diversity and Social Justice. Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
  46. Jeffrey Goodman (2013). A Problem for Fine Individuation and Artist Essentialism. Estetika 50 (2):139-148.
    Fine Individuation says it is impossible for distinct people who are not collaborating on a work of art to produce one and same artwork. This is an intra-world thesis, but is necessarily true, if true at all. Author Essentialism says it is impossible for someone else to produce one and the same work of art produced by some actual artist. This is an alleged necessary truth regarding cross-world relations. Both theses have been vigorously defended. I argue here that both are (...)
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  47. Oswald Hanfling (1995). Art, Artifact and Function. Philosophical Investigations 18 (1):31-48.
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  48. Darren Hudson Hick (2015). The Co‐Author Is Dead; Long Live the Co‐Author: A Reply to Killin, Bacharach, and Tollefsen. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):337-341.
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  49. Darren Hudson Hick (2014). Authorship, Co‐Authorship, and Multiple Authorship. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 72 (2):147-156.
    In this article, I use the example of the novel Micro, authored by Michael Crichton and Richard Preston, to tease out the relationships between an author and his work and with other authors of that work. The case presents a complication for a number of contemporary views on authorship and co-authorship, which suggest that Crichton is either not an author of the novel or an author but not a co-author—both, I suggest, are counterintuitive views. After working through the leading views (...)
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  50. Gizela Horvath (2013). WHY THE BRILLO BOX? THE RECOVERY OF THE AESTHETIC. In Applied Social Sciences: Philosophy and Theology.
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