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Asian Philosophy

Edited by JeeLoo Liu (California State University, Fullerton)
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  1. added 2016-12-04
    Margot Wilson, A Study of Ignorance: Suffering and Freedom in Early Buddhist Teachings and Parallels in Modern Neuroscience.
    What might early Buddhist teachings offer neuroscience and how might neuroscience inform contemporary Buddhism? Both early Buddhist teachings and cognitive neuroscience suggest that the conditioning of our cognitive apparatus and brain plays a role in agency that may be either efficacious or non-efficacious. Both consider internal time to play a central role in the efficacy of agency. Buddhism offers an approach that promises to increase the efficacy of agency. This approach is found in five early Buddhist teachings that are re-interpreted (...)
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  2. added 2016-12-03
    Justin Tiwald (2016). Xunzi Among the Chinese Neo-Confucians. In Eric Hutton (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Xunzi. Springer 435-473.
    This chapter explains how Xunzi's text and views helped shape the thought of the Neo-Confucian philosophers, noting and explicating some areas of influence long overlooked in modern scholarship. It begins with a general overview of Xunzi’s changing position in the tradition (“Xunzi’s Status in Neo-Confucian Thought”), in which I discuss Xunzi’s status in three general periods of Neo-Confucian era: the early period, in which Neo-Confucian views of Xunzi were varied and somewhat ambiguous, the “mature” period, in which a broad consensus (...)
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  3. added 2016-11-28
    Ramanathan Gandhibabu (ed.) (2015). Saiva Siddhantham - a Hermeneutic and Psycho Analytic Interpretation. Manibarathi.
    The SAIVA SIDDHANTHA sastra texts are not studied in debth and the interpretation varies from author to author on many issues. Besides the contemporary trends like hermeneutical and psycho-analytical interpretation are not done yet in the sastra texts. -/- A scientific study of the philosophy of the saiva doctrines especially the core philosophy is my aim. Traditional way to describe them would be to take up the three core issues of the saivite ontology that are the pathi, pasu and pasam. (...)
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  4. added 2016-11-22
    Chien-Hsing Ho (forthcoming). Paradoxical Language in Chan Buddhism. Springer.
    Chinese Chan or Zen Buddhism is renowned for its improvisational, atypical, and perplexing use of words. In particular, the tradition’s encounter dialogues, which took place between Chan masters and their interlocutors, abound in puzzling, astonishing, and paradoxical ways of speaking. In this chapter, we are concerned with Chan’s use of paradoxical language. In philosophical parlance, a linguistic paradox comprises the confluence of opposite or incongruent concepts in a way that runs counter to our common sense and ordinary rational thinking. One (...)
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  5. added 2016-11-22
    Yasutaka Muroya (forthcoming). The Nyāyamukha and Udghaṭitajña. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-31.
    The Nyāyamukha by Dignāga, considered the founder of the Buddhist epistemological school, is known to have been studied intensively by East Asian Buddhists and scholars through Xuanzang’s Chinese translation. However, Jinendrabuddhi’s commentary on Dignāga’s Pramāṇasamuccaya offers a clue that helps to better understand the religio-philosophical and historical position of the Nyāyamukha in South and East Asia. The eighth-century commentator describes the Nyāyamukha as a work for highly intelligent persons and contrasts it to Dignāga’s Pramāṇasamuccaya. He also preserves fragments of the (...)
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  6. added 2016-11-21
    Sai Hang Kwok (2016). Zhuangzi’s Philosophy of Thing. Asian Philosophy 26 (4):294-310.
    ABSTRACTIt is usually believed that the concept of ‘qiwu 齊物’ in the Zhuangzi means ‘equalizing things’. This reading of the Zhuangzi, however, presupposes that things are originally separated and exist independently. The equality of things is just a mental construct in a specific state of mind. In this paper, we will argue that this reading does not stand; what Zhuangzi does in the ‘Qiwulun 齊物論’is to examine how myriad things are created from the original oneness. According to Zhuangzi’s philosophy of (...)
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  7. added 2016-11-15
    Sumi Lee (2016). From Criticism to Approval: A Reconsideration of Ji’s Yogācāra Position on Madhyamaka. Asian Philosophy 26 (4):329-353.
    ABSTRACTMadhyamaka and Yogācāra are two Mahāyāna schools which have distinct systems. In the seventh century East Asia, the doctrinal distinction between the two schools was received as doctrinal contrast in the polemic circumstance of Emptiness-Existence controversy. In this context, Ji 基, the putative founder of East Asian Yogācāra school, has been normally considered by scholars to have advocated ‘Existence’ in opposition to ‘Emptiness’. It is problematic, however, to brand Ji’s Yogācāra position simply as anti-Madhyamaka. Although Ji evidently expresses evident criticism (...)
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  8. added 2016-11-02
    Swami Narasimhananda (2016). Phalaharini Kali Hindu Vishva Malayalam September-October 2016. Hindu Vishva 32 (5/6):5-11; 22-28.
    This article discusses the implications of the symbology of Kali from a different and fresh perspective and positions the worship of Kali in the bigger picture of the divinisation of everything in Sanatana Dharma. It also discusses the needless marginalisation of so-called 'ugly' and 'terrible' and how these prejudices have to be overcome to realise the Divinity innate in all.
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  9. added 2016-11-02
    Li Cunshan (2016). Book of Lord Shang and Elevation of Confucianism in the Han—Including the Discussion of the Conflict Between Shang Yang, His School, and the Confucians. Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):112-124.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article presents a counterintuitive view that the rise of Confucianism in the Han dynasty is indebted to the Book of Lord Shang. It analyzes chapter 7, “Opening the blocked,” and shows that the chapter can be read as promoting a combination of force and morality. The sophisticated historical view of this chapter solves apparent contradictions between societies based on family ties, meritocracy, and monarchic power by showing how new levels of social development inevitably open up when old paths (...)
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  10. added 2016-11-02
    Zhang Linxiang (2016). Progress or Change? Rethinking the Historical Outlook of the Book of Lord Shang. Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):90-111.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article is a reflection on the nature of “changing with the times” that is put forward in the Book of Lord Shang. The author challenges the modern, predominantly Marxist, portrayal of Shang Yang as the exceptional Warring States master promoting a progressive view of history. The Book of Lord Shang does not prioritize future over the present or present over the past, nor does it envision a large-scale rational understanding of the historical trends, nor the possibility to improve (...)
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  11. added 2016-11-02
    Tong Weimin (2016). On the Composition of the “Attracting the People” Chapter of the Book of Lord Shang. Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):138-151.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article argues on the basis of internal and external evidence that chapter 15 “Attracting the people” was written by a follower of Shang Yang in the later years of King Zhao of Qin. While the idea of attracting immigrants can be traced back to Shang Yang himself, the article dates the chapter seventy-eight years after his death.
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  12. added 2016-11-02
    Yuri Pines & Carine Defoort (2016). Chinese Academic Views on Shang Yang Since the Open-Up-and-Reform Era. Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):59-68.
    ABSTRACTThe Book of Lord Shang attributed to Shang Yang is one of the most controversial products of ideological debates in pre-imperial China. Forty years ago, Li Yu-ning summarized previous rounds of debates that peaked with the Shang Yang fervor of the early 1970s. The present article takes over where she ended, further exploring trends in studies of the Book of Lord Shang since the Open-up-and-Reform Era. The paper shows that despite a clear tendency of depoliticization of these studies, scholars are (...)
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  13. added 2016-11-02
    Zeng Zhenyu (2016). Shang Yang as a Historical Personality and as a Symbol. Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):69-89.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article gives an overview of Shang Yang portrayals in four stages: from Han Fei’s sympathetic yet balanced assessment, passing over a variety of conflicting Han views, skipping through “the two millennia of vilification” to Zhang Taiyan’s rediscovery of Shang Yang, and ending up at the Shang Yang fervor of the 1970s. Zeng shows how the figure of Shang Yang keeps popping up with a certain regularity, inciting conflicts about his legacy. He also argues that at each flare of (...)
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  14. added 2016-11-02
    Wu Baoping & Lin Cunguang (2016). Reflections on the Concept of “Law” of Shang Yang From the Perspective of Political Philosophy: Function, Value, and Spirit of the “Rule of Law”. Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):125-137.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article argues that Shang Yang’s philosophy of law was not only a means to enrich the state and strengthen its army, but also envisioned the orderly rule of all All-under-Heaven. Through a fair, universal, and reliable use of rewards, punishments, and also teaching, this vision of laws could ultimately lead to the promotion of moral values, popular consensus, and people’s self-governance. While the authors admit that in Shang Yang’s own historical context, law was no more than a tool (...)
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  15. added 2016-10-31
    Xingming Hu (forthcoming). A Critical Survey of Some Recent Philosophical Research in China. Philosophia:1-28.
    In this paper, I survey some recent literature produced by the established Chinese philosophers who regularly publish in Chinese philosophy journals and work in Mainland China. Specifically, I review the recent research of these philosophers in two areas: Chinese Philosophy and epistemology. In each area, I focus on two topics that have caught the attention of a lot of Chinese philosophers. I argue that the Chinese philosophers’ research on these topics has two prevalent problems: (i) a lot of arguments they (...)
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  16. added 2016-10-31
    Margot Wilson (2016). A Study of Ignorance: Suffering and Freedom in Early Buddhist Teachings and Parallels in Modern Neuroscience. Dissertation, University of Glasgow
    What might early Buddhist teachings offer neuroscience and how might neuroscience inform contemporary Buddhism? Both early Buddhist teachings and cognitive neuroscience suggest that the conditioning of our cognitive apparatus and brain plays a role in agency that may be either efficacious or non-efficacious. Both consider internal time to play a central role in the efficacy of agency. Buddhism offers an approach that promises to increase the efficacy of agency. This approach is found in five early Buddhist teachings that are re-interpreted (...)
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  17. added 2016-10-20
    Jinhua Jia (2016). Gender and Early Chinese Cosmology Revisited. Asian Philosophy 26 (4):281-293.
    ABSTRACTThis article proposes to challenge the generally accepted argument that early Chinese cosmology transcended questions of gender by presenting a new analysis of the Xian 咸 and other relevant hexagrams in the Classic of Changes, as well as their classical commentaries. This new study shows that, the concept of the resonant gendered relation of husband and wife played a significant role in constructing social relations and cosmological modes implied in this significant classic. The harmonious husband–wife relation was placed at the (...)
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  18. added 2016-10-15
    Stephan Atzert (2016). Schopenhauer's Encounter with Indian Thought: Representation and Will and Their Indian Parallels by Stephen Cross. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1353-1357.
    From the first part of the title, Schopenhauer’s Encounter with Indian Thought, the reader could expect a study of the influence that Indian philosophy had on Schopenhauer. And even though this expectation will be met, Stephen Cross primarily presents a well-documented analysis of parallels between Schopenhauer’s philosophy and that of the Buddhist schools of Madhyamaka and Yogācāra, of the early Advaita Vedānta, and those of other configurations of religious and philosophical ideas prevalent in India. Cross employs their philosophical deliberations to (...)
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  19. added 2016-10-15
    Paul J. D'Ambrosio, I. I. I. Robert A. Carleo & Andrew Lambert (2016). On Li Zehou's Philosophy: An Introduction by Three Translators. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1057-1067.
    Li Zehou is perhaps best known among Western audiences for his work on aesthetics. This is mainly due to the fact that translations of his writings available in English are mostly limited to his aesthetics.1 The content of A Response to Michael Sandel and Other Matters differs greatly from these previous translations. Published in Chinese in 2014, it is one of Li’s most recent books, and in it he discusses several main points of the systematic philosophical outlook he has developed (...)
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  20. added 2016-10-15
    Bongrae Seok (2016). Heaven and Earth Are Not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy by Franklin Perkins. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1377-1380.
    Why do bad things happen to good people? Why isn’t good moral intention always rewarded? Franklin Perkins discusses these challenging questions about good and evil in his recent book Heaven and Earth Are not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy. As the title suggests, Perkins focuses on the unique Chinese notion of heaven and its related philosophical issues of undeserved misfortune and limited moral efficacy. The subtitle of the book is equally intriguing. Perkins discusses these philosophical issues (...)
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  21. added 2016-10-15
    Li Zehou, Paul J. D'Ambrosio & I. I. I. Robert A. Carleo (2016). A Response to Michael Sandel and Other Matters. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1068-1147.
    Are you familiar with Michael Sandel’s work?Yes I am. In the nineties I read several books on communitarianism, including Michael Sandel’s Democracy’s Discontent: America in Search of a Public Philosophy.What do you think of communitarianism?I discussed communitarianism in my books Five Essays from 1999 and, especially, Historical Ontology more than ten years ago. My thoughts have not changed since then. Simply put, I think communitarianism is the product of developed countries with long traditions of liberalism. It has referential value, but (...)
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  22. added 2016-10-15
    Sin Yee Chan (2016). Evaluative Desire in the Mencius. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1168-1195.
    The concept of yu 欲 is an under-explored concept in the scholarship on early Confucianism. Perhaps due to the focus on the term “the yu of eyes and ears,” a common term in early Chinese philosophy denoting desires for sensual gratification, or on the Daoist stance on desires, many scholars tend to emphasize the negative and the hedonistic connotations of the term. For example, Chad Hansen notes that the early Confucians do not “make desires central in their account of human (...)
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  23. added 2016-10-15
    Itsuki Hayashi (2016). Persons as Weakly Emergent: An Alternative Reading of Vasubandhu's Ontology of Persons. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1218-1230.
    According to the Buddhist doctrine of Two Truths, there are no persons in our final ontology, but there are persons in our conventional ontology. What does it mean to say that persons exist conventionally? The Ābhidharmikas say that ultimately there are psychophysical tropes, called dharmas, certain collections or combinations of which are conventionally taken to be persons. We would then ask: what kind of reality is conventional reality, and what is the metaphysical relation between conventional reality and ultimate reality as (...)
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  24. added 2016-10-15
    Matti Nojonen (2016). Mestari Kongin Keskustelut: Kungfutselaisuuden Ydinolemus by Jyrki Kallio. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1368-1373.
    The Discourses of Master Kong: The Essence of Confucianism, written in Finnish by Jyrki Kallio, is a laudable work on Confucianism not only for students of Chinese philosophy but for a broader audience as well. The book is the first comprehensive work on Confucianism in the Finnish language: it comprises an annotated and critical complete translation of the Analects as well as longer selected and annotated translations from the Guodian corpus and central early Confucian classics such as the Mengzi and (...)
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  25. added 2016-10-15
    Kirill O. Thompson (2016). Philosophical Reflections on the "Fish Happiness" Anecdote. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1307-1318.
    The “Fish Happiness” anecdote in the Zhuangzi is a literary gem, a well-wrought urn, which simultaneously reflects and informs the “Autumn Floods” chapter,1 as well as the text as a whole.2 Despite its polish and surface clarity, the anecdote has afforded a variety of readings. Its points and assumptions tend to be muted or understated in pun, so the reader is pressed to bring his or her own intellectual wits to bear. Indeed, one wonders if the fish happiness anecdote wasn’t (...)
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  26. added 2016-10-15
    Thora Ilin Bayer (2016). Kritik der Symbolischen Formen I: Symbolische Form Und Funktion by Raji C. Steineck. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1357-1359.
    For any reader with knowledge of the works of Ernst Cassirer, the question that will come to mind on approaching Raji C. Steineck’s Kritik der symbolischen Formen I: Symbolische Form und Funktion is: Why Japan? Cassirer’s great range of writings on the history of thought, culture, and symbol involves no sustained attention to Japanese culture. Cassirer also never addresses problems of East-West philosophy, nor did he, unlike some other German thinkers in the twentieth century, engage in correspondence with Japanese thinkers. (...)
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  27. added 2016-10-15
    Joel Feldman (2016). Paving the Great Way: Vasubandhu's Unifying Buddhist Philosophy by Jonathan C. Gold. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1359-1366.
    Vasubandhu is perhaps the most influential figure in the history of Buddhist philosophy, yet the very breadth of his contribution across many schools and traditions has led to a fragmentation of his works, as interpreters have tended to read them through the lens of narrow scholastic perspectives, finding little continuity or coherence. Some modern scholars, doubtful that anyone could have held such varied views, have gone so far as to divide Vasubandhu himself into two distinct philosophers, with two different and (...)
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  28. added 2016-10-15
    Charles B. Jones (2016). Creation and Causality in Chinese-Jesuit Polemical Literature. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1251-1272.
    In Giulio Aleni’s The True Source of the Myriad Things chapter 4 contains the following question and answer:One might say that it is like seeds: from only one seed the subsequent branches, trunk, and blossoms are produced in a truly spontaneous manner. There need not be an external creator. All things have their own inherent natures, and they come forth on the basis of their inherent natures spontaneously; why must they have some external maker?1I [i.e., Aleni] say: The sprouting of (...)
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  29. added 2016-10-15
    Ethan Mills (2016). The Philosophy of Lokāyata: A Review and Reconsideration by Bijayananda Kar. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1366-1368.
    The paucity of classical sources concerning the Cārvāka/Lokāyata school is mirrored by a scarcity of contemporary scholarship. On that note, this book is a welcome contribution. The subtitle of this book promises “a review and reconstruction.” There is some review of classical and contemporary sources ; however, the bulk of the book is Kar’s reconstruction of what he thinks the Cārvākas might have or should have said. I will follow Kar in using “Cārvāka” and “Lokāyata” interchangeably to refer to the (...)
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  30. added 2016-10-15
    Ian M. Sullivan (2016). Moral Relativism and Chinese Philosophy: David Wong and His Critics Ed. By Yang Xiao and Yong Huang. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1381-1385.
    David B. Wong’s 2006 monograph, Natural Moralities: A Defense of Pluralistic Relativism,1 presents and defends a sophisticated and nuanced form of moral relativism that has been in development since his 1984 work, Moral Relativity. The present volume, Moral Relativism and Chinese Philosophy, is a collection of six critical essays focused on Natural Moralities, which are followed by Wong’s responses to each of his critics. I see the greater contribution of this volume, when we consider the title’s conjuncts, to be the (...)
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  31. added 2016-10-15
    Shuhong Zheng (2016). Intellect and Will in Zhu Xi and Meister Eckhart. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1319-1339.
    Such is the significance of the question concerning intellect and will that it has been discussed in both the Confucian and the Christian traditions and has even triggered two different schools of thought within each tradition. In Confucianism, it speaks of the fundamental divergence between lixue 理學 and xinxue 心學 in the Neo-Confucian movement. In the Christian tradition, it speaks of the difference between the Franciscans and the Dominicans. A comparative study of Zhu Xi, the leading master of lixue in (...)
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  32. added 2016-10-15
    Tzu-li Chang (2016). Re-Exploring Wang Yangming's Theory of Liangzhi : Translation, Transliteration, and Interpretation. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1196-1217.
    Admittedly there exists a considerable amount of contemporary literature on liangzhi that, to a certain extent, provides us with fruitful and insightful perspectives into Wang Yangming’s doctrine. And the majority of this literature, as if by tacit agreement, focuses on the interconnection between liangzhi and knowledge, whether it be innate, original, perfect, or moral knowledge. While this academic endeavor is credited with pushing forward studies of Chinese thought, it is the task of philosophy always to engage in the examination of (...)
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  33. added 2016-10-15
    Nicholas Hudson (2016). Visions of Peace: Asia and the West Ed. By Takashi Shogimen and Vicki A. Spencer. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1386-1387.
    Peace, compared to war, receives scant attention. Comprised of nine essays drawn from a 2009 conference, the essays collected in Visions of Peace: Asia and the West, edited by Takashi Shogimen and Vicki A. Spencer, reach wide and far to push against that neglect. The essays focus on different conceptions of and plans for political peace. Even more impressively, they generally avoid well-trodden paths like Kant’s Toward Perpetual Peace and instead draw upon Asian traditions and more obscure Western traditions. The (...)
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  34. added 2016-10-15
    Ann A. Pang-White (2016). Metaphor and Metaphilosophy: Philosophy as Combat, Play, and Aesthetic Experience by Sarah A. Mattice. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1374-1376.
    What is philosophy? What is metaphor? Could thinking take place metaphorically? If one follows the mainstream Western definition of philosophy, the answer to the latter question would certainly be negative. Metaphors are perceived as primitive, pre-analytical, and imprecise—thus pre-philosophical! Drawing on multiple cross-cultural resources, Metaphor and Metaphilosophy: Philosophy as Combat, Play, and Aesthetic Experience by Sarah A. Mattice insightfully challenges this widespread assumption in the current...
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  35. added 2016-10-15
    Thomas D. Carroll (2016). Wittgenstein and the Analects on the Ethics of Clarification. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1148-1167.
    At first glance, it might seem an odd pairing: the Analects and Wittgenstein. Comparison between a classical Chinese philosophical text, whose primary topics were the cultivation of xiao and he, and the corpus of an early to mid-twentieth-century Austrian philosopher, whose primary topics had to do with logic, language, and the nature of philosophy, does not obviously recommend itself. Yet, I contend in this article that there is much to be gained from careful comparison between these two very different pictures (...)
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  36. added 2016-10-15
    Jeffrey Flynn (2016). From Practice to Theory: Sungmoon Kim on Confucian Democracy. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1340-1347.
    Sungmoon Kim’s Confucian Democracy in East Asia: Theory and Practice is a brilliant and engaging contribution to our understanding of democratic theory and practice.1 The title of my comment here emphasizes the innovative way in which Kim moves from practice to theory by relying on the vibrant Confucian civil society in South Korea as both the normative inspiration for and practical reflection of his model of Confucian democracy. In the first section below, I highlight three interrelated ways in which Kim’s (...)
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  37. added 2016-10-15
    Sungmoon Kim (2016). What Kind of Democracy Is a Confucian Democracy?: A Response to Jeffrey Flynn. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1347-1352.
    Jeff Flynn’s comments on my methodological pluralism as well as the way I do political theory, namely explanatory evaluation, capture remarkably well what I struggled with most in writing Confucian Democracy in East Asia: Theory and Practice. As Flynn rightly notes, my research questions were inspired by actual problems with which contemporary East Asians commonly struggle, and my goal was to derive philosophical inspirations from the actual social, cultural, and political realities of East Asia for normative political theory of Confucian (...)
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  38. added 2016-10-15
    Koji Tanaka (2016). On Nāgārjuna's Ontological and Semantic Paradox. Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1292-1306.
    In one of his key texts, the Mūlamadhyamakakārikā, Nāgārjuna famously sets out to refute the ontology of essence.1 He presents numerous arguments to show that things don’t exist essentially—that is, that things are empty of essence or inherent existence. The doctrine of emptiness has been variously understood by traditional and contemporary commentators. Most radical is the recent interpretation presented by Garfield and Priest. They have rationally reconstructed Nāgārjuna’s doctrine of emptiness as an endorsement of the contradictory nature of reality. According (...)
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  39. added 2016-10-13
    Muhammad Ali Hassan Mughal, M. Rafiqul Islam & Gary M. Zatzman (2016). A Communitarian Alternative Solution to the Pension Crisis. International Journal of Political Theory 1 (1):28-49.
    This paper evaluates the economic effects of a politically communitarian model of family ties towards the pension crisis in developing countries. The use of a Canadian - an individualist-oriented political economic pension system - is compared to a religiously and culturally communitarian form of family care in Bangladesh, a country slowly feeling the effects of the pension crisis. The analysis concludes, based on theoretical and economic evidence, that it is not in the social or economic interest of Bangladesh or similar (...)
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  40. added 2016-10-11
    Michael Vincent Yang (2016). A Critique of Confucius’ Philosophy. Asian Philosophy 26 (4):354-374.
    ABSTRACTThroughout the millennia since the composition of the Analects, orthodox scholars have maintained that Confucius faithfully passed down the thought of early eras, particularly those of Yao and Shun: ‘I transmit but do not create ideas.’ This paper shows that Confucius actually subverted the essence of orthodox thought represented mainly by Yao and Shun. His subversion of orthodox thought compels perforce the idea of ‘ren,’ which concerns itself with the human world, to stand out with the near exclusion of otherworldliness (...)
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  41. added 2016-10-10
    Dennis Schilling (2016). Reconsidering Human Dignity in a Confucian Context: A Review of Ni Peimin’s Conceptual Reconstruction. [REVIEW] Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):619-629.
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  42. added 2016-10-07
    Chenyang Li (2016). Comparative Philosophy and Cultural Patterns. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):533-546.
    As a genus of philosophy, comparative philosophy serves various important purposes. It helps people understand various philosophies and it helps philosophers develop new ideas and solve problems. In this essay, I first clarify the meaning of “comparative philosophy” and its main purposes, arguing that an important purpose of comparative philosophy is to help us understand cultural patterns. This function makes comparative philosophy even more significant in today’s globalized world.
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  43. added 2016-10-06
    Fei Lan (2016). Desire: The Unfolding of the Other. Asian Philosophy 26 (4):311-328.
    ABSTRACTThe Confucian classic the Liji 禮記 defines ‘desire’ as ‘the arousal of nature’. In line with this classical definition, Dai Zhen 戴震 sees desire as human nature in activation. However, while the Liji ascribes human deceits and debauchery to the susceptibility of human nature, Dai Zhen speaks highly of its responsiveness and receptivity. This article discusses Dai Zhen’s conception of desire and argues that Dai Zhen distinguishes himself from other Confucian moral thinkers by bringing to light the dimension of the (...)
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  44. added 2016-10-05
    Erin M. Cline (2016). Confucianism, Human Dignity, and Reverence for Life. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):607-617.
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  45. added 2016-10-05
    Warren G. Frisina (2016). Thinking Through Hall and Ames: On the Art of Comparative Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):563-574.
    With the publication of their first collaborative book Thinking Through Confucius, David Hall and Roger Ames launched a comparative philosophical project juxtaposing American pragmatism and Chinese Confucianism. This essay focuses on the role pragmatic assumptions play in Hall’s and Ames’s announced goal of opening a “new route” into Chinese intellectual history. Hall and Ames aim to teach scholars whose scholarly sensibilities have been formed in the West what they must acknowledge about their own traditions before they can engage Chinese thinkers (...)
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  46. added 2016-10-05
    David Chai (2016). On Pillowing One’s Skull: Zhuangzi and Heidegger on Death. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 11 (3):483-500.
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  47. added 2016-10-05
    Robert Cummings Neville (2016). Turns of the Dao. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):499-510.
    Fifteen years after the publication of my assessment of comparative philosophy in the inaugural issue of Dao, this article comments on some of the major changes that have taken place in the field since Dao began. One of the most significant is the improvement in the conditions for Chinese philosophy in mainland China and the return of many of the original participants in Dao’s audience to positions in East Asia from earlier careers in the West. The article also surveys advances (...)
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  48. added 2016-10-05
    Henrique Schneider (2016). Bell, Daniel A., The China Model: Political Meritocracy and the Limits of Democracy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):639-642.
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  49. added 2016-10-05
    Steven F. Geisz (2015). Aging, Equality, and Confucian Selves. In Roger T. Ames Peter D. Hershock (ed.), Value and Values: Economics and Justice in an Age of Global Interdependence. University of Hawaii Press 483-502.
    Liberal democracy aims to treat all adult citizens as politically equal, at least in ideal cases: Once a citizen is over the age of majority, she is deemed a full-fledged member of the community and in theory has equal standing with all other adult citizens when it comes to making policy and participating in the political realm in general. I consider three questions: (1) Is there any plausible alternative to a standard "all adult citizens have equal political standing" model of (...)
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  50. added 2016-10-05
    Chung-Ying Cheng (2008). Preface. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35:1-3.
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