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Asian Philosophy

Edited by JeeLoo Liu (California State University, Fullerton)
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  1. added 2016-05-25
    Blaine Snow, Waking Up and Growing Up: Two Forms of Human Development.
    This paper contrasts two relatively independent forms of human development: waking up, the process and practices of psychospiritual awakening , and growing up, the process of moving from lesser narcissistic and ethnocentric self-identities towards mature postconventional self-identities with greater degrees of inclusion, perspective-taking, caring, and compassion. Each is a unique type of growth, contemplative and transformative, with different ways of engaging and differing goals and results. The former is about transcending or deconstructing the ego and the latter about building, strengthening, (...)
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  2. added 2016-05-25
    Mingjun Lu (2016). Implications of Han Fei’s Philosophy for China’s Legal and Institutional Reforms. Journal of Chinese Political Science:1-18.
    In his treatise Han Fei Zi, the Chinese ancient thinker Han Fei proposes a governance structure that emphasizes the institutionalization of legal norms, judicious sovereign intervention, and ministerial obligations. These three core concepts of Han’s legal thinking are informed by both the Taoist law of Nature and the Confucian philosophy as is expounded by Xun Zi. Recognition of the Taoist and Confucian influences brings to light the ethical and normative dimensions of Han’s legal thought, dimensions that, I propose, provide new (...)
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  3. added 2016-05-18
    Nicholaos Jones (2016). Correlative Reasoning About Water in Mengzi 6A2. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):193-207.
    Mengzi 孟子 6A2 contains the famous water analogy for the innate goodness of human nature. Some evaluate Mengzi’s reasoning as strong and sophisticated; others, as weak or sophistical. I urge for more nuance in our evaluation. Mengzi’s reasoning fares poorly when judged by contemporary standards of analogical strength. However, if we evaluate the analogy as an instance of correlative thinking within a yin-yang 陰陽 cosmology, his reasoning fares well. That cosmology provides good reason to assert that water tends to flow (...)
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  4. added 2016-05-16
    Ann A. Pang-White (2016). Non-Self, Agency, and Women: Buddhism’s Modern Transformation. In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender (London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic). 331-356.
    In “Non-self, Agency, and Women: Buddhism’s Modern Transformation,” Ann A. Pang-White argues that “non-self (anātman 無我)” and “emptiness (śūnyatā 空)” necessarily entail nonduality. Buddha nature is neither male nor female. Nonetheless, conflicting teachings are found in various Theravada and Mahayana texts. The more conservative texts have historically resulted in long-standing patriarchal practices: Buddhist nuns receive much less respect and financial support than monks, often facing the possibility of extinction. In Taiwan, however, in a complete reversal, Buddhist nuns outnumber male monks (...)
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  5. added 2016-05-16
    Ann A. Pang-White (2016). Introduction: Rereading the Canon. In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender (London, UK: Bloomsbury Academic). 1-21.
    The Introductory chapter explains the purpose of the book. To this aim, the chapter contains four subsections: (1)Bring the Past Into the Present, (2)Multiculturalism and Liberal Feminism: Is the Rift Between Them Necessary?, (3)Development of Gender Discourse in Chinese Culture and Thought, (4)Purpose of This Volume and Its Four Main Parts, and (5) What's Next? A Way Forward. Excerpt: "Chinese philosophy, broadly construed, in its varied roots and forms has approximately three thousand years of history, and it continues to exert (...)
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  6. added 2016-05-16
    Ann A. Pang-White (2016). Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,”. In The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender. 69-88.
    In Chinese philosophy’s encounter with modernity and feminist discourse, Neo-Confucianism often suffered the most brutal attacks and criticisms. In “Neo-Confucians and Zhu Xi on Family and Woman: Challenges and Potentials,” Ann A. Pang-White investigates Song Neo-Confucians’ views (in particular, that of Zhu Xi) on women by examining the Classifi ed Conversations of Zhu Xi (Zhuzi Yulei), the Reflections on Things at Hand (Jinsi Lu), Further Reflections on Things at Hand (Xu Jinsi Lu), and other texts. Pang-White also takes a close (...)
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  7. added 2016-05-13
    Ann A. Pang-White (ed.) (2016). Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Covering the historical, social, political, and cultural contexts, The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Chinese Philosophy and Gender presents a comprehensive overview of the complexity of gender disparity in Chinese thought and culture. -/- Divided into four main sections, an international group of experts in Chinese Studies write on Confucian, Daoist and Buddhist approaches to gender relations. Each section includes a general introduction, a set of authoritative articles written by leading scholars and comprehensive bibliographies, designed to provide the non-specialist with a (...)
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  8. added 2016-05-13
    Vijay K. Jain (2016). Ācārya Samantabhadra’s Ratnakarandaka-Śrāvakācāra = The Jewel-Casket of Householder’s Conduct. Vikalp Printers.
    Ratnakarandaka-śrāvakācāra, comprising 150 verses, is a celebrated and perhaps the earliest Digambara work dealing with the excellent path of dharma that every householder (śrāvaka) must follow. All his efforts should be directed towards the acquisition and safekeeping of the Three Jewels (ratnatraya), comprising right faith (samyagdarśana), right knowledge (samyagjñāna) and right conduct (samyakcāritra), which lead to releasing him from worldly sufferings and establishing him in the state of supreme happiness. The treatise expounds an easy-to-understand meaning of ‘right faith’: To have (...)
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  9. added 2016-05-13
    Vijay K. Jain (2016). Ācārya Samantabhadra’s Ratnakarandaka-Śrāvakācāra = The Jewel-Casket of Householder’s Conduct. Vikalp Printers.
    Ratnakarandaka-śrāvakācāra, comprising 150 verses, is a celebrated and perhaps the earliest Digambara work dealing with the excellent path of dharma that every householder (śrāvaka) must follow. All his efforts should be directed towards the acquisition and safekeeping of the Three Jewels (ratnatraya), comprising right faith (samyagdarśana), right knowledge (samyagjñāna) and right conduct (samyakcāritra), which lead to releasing him from worldly sufferings and establishing him in the state of supreme happiness. The treatise expounds an easy-to-understand meaning of ‘right faith’: To have (...)
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  10. added 2016-05-10
    Kurtis Hagen (2016). Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi Ed. By T. C. Kline III and Justin Tiwald. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):676-678.
    As the title Ritual and Religion in the Xunzi accurately suggests, this collection of essays edited by T. C. Kline III and Justin Tiwald addresses Xunzi’s perspective on ritual and religion. Some of the essays are new, others are have been published previously. As a whole, the book strives to portray Xunzi as a religious philosopher, and to elucidate his potential contribution to the understanding of religion and ritual. Although there are a variety of views presented, Xunzi is (...)
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  11. added 2016-05-10
    Erin M. Cline (2016). The Boundaries of Manners: Ritual and Etiquette in Early Confucianism and Stohr’s On Manners. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):241-255.
    Early Confucian philosophy affirms and lends support to Karen Stohr’s argument that manners are a primary means by which we express moral attitudes and commitments and carry out important moral goals. Indeed, Confucian views on ritual can extend her insights even further, both by highlighting the role that manners play in cultivating good character and by helping us to probe the conceptual boundaries of manners. The various things that we call etiquette, social customs, and rituals do much of the same (...)
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  12. added 2016-05-09
    Dirck Vorenkamp, Fa-­Tsang on Madhyamaka: Nagarjuna’s Treatise on the Twelve Gates and Fa-­Tsang’s Commentary.
    Translation of Nagarjuna's -Treatise on the Twelve Gates- as well as fazang's commentary on that treatise.
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  13. added 2016-05-09
    Tai-Wing Wong, The Flower Ornament Golden Lion Treatise.
    English translation and annotation of Fazang's Treatise on the Golden Lion.
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  14. added 2016-05-06
    Roy Tzohar (forthcoming). Does Early Yogācāra Have a Theory of Meaning? Sthiramati’s Arguments on Metaphor in the Triṃśikā-Bhāṣya. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-22.
    Can the early Yogācāra be said to present a systematic theory of meaning? The paper argues that Sthiramati’s bhāṣya on Vasubandhu’s Triṃśikā, in which he argues that all language-use is metaphorical, indeed amounts to such a theory, both because of the text’s engagement with the wider Indian philosophical conversation about reference and meaning and by virtue of the questions it addresses and its motivations. Through a translation and analysis of key sections of Sthiramati’s commentary I present the main features of (...)
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  15. added 2016-05-05
    Laura Specker Sullivan (2016). Uncovering Metaethical Assumptions in Bioethical Discourse Across Cultures. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 26 (1):47-78.
    Much of bioethical discourse now takes place across cultures. This does not mean that cross-cultural understanding has increased. Many cross-cultural bioethical discussions are marked by entrenched disagreement about whether and why local practices are justified. In this paper, I argue that a major reason for these entrenched disagreements is that problematic metaethical commitments are hidden in these cross-cultural discourses. Using the issue of informed consent in East Asia as an example of one such discourse, I analyze two representative positions in (...)
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  16. added 2016-05-04
    Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2012). Review of Vijñāna Bhairava: The Manual for Self-Realization. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (8):429-30.
    This is a review of a classical text of Kashmiri Shaivism.
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  17. added 2016-05-03
    Bryan Norden (2015). Kelleher, M. Theresa, Trans., The Journal of Wu Yubi: The Path to Sagehood. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (3):459-462.
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  18. added 2016-05-02
    Alf Hiltebeitel (forthcoming). Mokṣa and Dharma in the Mokṣadharma. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-18.
    This essay asks what the terms mokṣa and dharma mean in the anomalous and apparently Mahābhārata-coined compound mokṣadharma, which provides the title for the Śāntiparvan’s third and most philosophical anthology; and it further asks what that title itself means. Its route to answering those questions is to look at the last four units of the Mokṣadharmaparvan and their three topics—the story of Śuka, the Nārāyaṇīya, and a gleaner’s subtale—as marking an “artful curvature” that shapes the outcome of King Yudhiṣṭhira’s philosophical (...)
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  19. added 2016-05-02
    Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2016). Mindful Therapy: A Guide for Therapists and Helping Professionals. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (5):480-82.
    This is a study in Buddhist psychoanalysis, especially the care of the care-giver.
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  20. added 2016-04-30
    Jiri Benovsky (forthcoming). The Self, Agency, and Responsibility: A Rejoinder to Siderits. Philosophy East and West.
    In the same issue of Philosophy East and West, Mark Siderits has written a reply to my article "Buddhist philosophy and the non-Self view". This is a rejoinder to Siderits' reply.
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  21. added 2016-04-27
    Subhasis Chattopadhyay (2014). Review of Hindu Samskaras: Socio-Religious Study of the Hindu Sacraments. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (8):501-2.
    This review addresses issues regarding the very shaping of Hinduism and the resistance that such shaping faces from non-Hindus. Non-Hindu polemic is challenged using Western methods.
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  22. added 2016-04-25
    Nicholas Hudson (2016). Translating Totality in Parts: Chengguan's Commentaries and Subcommentaries to the Avatamsaka Sutra by Guo Cheen. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):695-696.
    Guo Cheen’s Translating Totality in Parts: Chengguan’s Commentaries and Subcommentaries to the Avatamsaka Sutra translates the first of eighty fascicles or juan of Chengguan’s A Compilation of the Commentaries and Subcommentaries to the Flower Ornament Sutra with Greatly Proper and Extensive Discourses by the Buddhas as well as the preface to his The Meanings Proclaimed in the Subcommentaries Accompanying the Commentaries to the Flower Ornament Sutra with Greatly Proper and Extensive Discourses by the Buddha. Guo Cheen translates the preface first, (...)
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  23. added 2016-04-22
    Desh Raj Sirswal, Relevance of Substance Theory of Charvaka in Present Times.
    भारतीय चिन्तन परम्परा में पंच-महाभूत का बहुत महत्वपूर्ण स्थान है. भारतीय प्राचीन ग्रन्थों से लेकर अब तक विश्व की सरंचना सम्बन्धी सिद्धांतों में पंच-महाभूत सबसे स्वीकार्य सिद्धांत माना जाता रहा है. ये पांच तत्व हैं: पृथ्वी, जल, वायु, अग्नि और आकाश. परन्तु चार्वाक जैसे दार्शनिक और आर्यभट्ट (पांचवीं शताब्दी) जैसे विज्ञानी यह कहते आ रहे हैं की तत्व पांच नहीं, चार हैं. इन लोगों ने आकाश को स्वतंत्र तत्व के रूप में स्वीकर नहीं किया. चार्वाक का यह भी विचार रहा (...)
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  24. added 2016-04-22
    Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2016). Dr. B.R. Ambedkar: The Maker of Modern India. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    Dr. B. R. Ambedkar is one of the most eminent intellectual figures of modern India. The present year is being celebrated as 125th Birth Anniversary of Dr. B. R. Ambedkar. Educationist and humanist from all over the world are celebrating 125th Birth Anniversary of Dr. B. R. Ambedkar by organizing various events and programmes. In this regard the Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdiscipinary Studies (CPPIS) Pehowa (Kurukshetra) took an initiative to be a part of this mega event by organizing (...)
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  25. added 2016-04-22
    Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2016). Contemporary Indian Philosophy. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    The 150th Birth Anniversary of Swami Vivekananda (1863-1902) will be celebrated all over the world during this year. The year long world-wide celebration of 150th birth anniversary of Swami Vivekananda was formally inaugurated by the President of India at Swamiji's Ancestral House on 18th January, 2013. His short speech was very inspiring, he made a significant remark after quoting the great historian A.L.Basham , “Swami Vivekananda was very relevant during his times, is more relevant now and will remain relevant as (...)
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  26. added 2016-04-22
    Desh Raj Sirswal (2016). Essays on Positive Philosophy. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    The present book, “Essays on Positive Philosophy” is an anthology of revised papers presented in several places. I am thankful to the organizers of the seminars who gave me an opportunity to share my ideas on their platform. The first paper “Philosophy and Values in Public Affairs: An Appraisal” presented in National Seminar on Philosophy in Practice: Making Sense of Human Existence organized by Society for Philosophical Praxis Counselling and Spiritual Healing held on 23rd Feb, 2014 at Department of Philosophy, (...)
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  27. added 2016-04-22
    Merina Islam (ed.) (2015). The Religious-Philosophical Dimensions. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    The book, “The Religious-Philosophical Dimensions” is the outcome of the second online session organized by Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra) with the theme “Development of Philosophy in India” held on 24th June, 2014. Indian philosophy is the name given to different philosophical thoughts that grew and developed on Indian soil. Philosophy in India has a very ancient origin. In fact, philosophical speculations started in India in the Vedic age itself. Freethinking sages of ancient India speculated (...)
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  28. added 2016-04-22
    Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2014). The Philosophy of Dalit Liberation. Centre for Studies in Educational, Social and Cultural Development (CSESCD), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    In this short title, we are presenting three essays on the philosophy of Dr. B.R.Ambedkar which discussed his ideas on casteism, social change, education, social justice, education, women issues, and democracy etc. These essays are the revised version of papers presented in the National Seminar on “Ambedkarite Quest on Egalitarian Revolution in India” (26th & 27th November, 2013) organized by the Centre for Dr. B. R. Ambedkar Studies, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra, Haryana. In the end of this book I included a (...)
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  29. added 2016-04-22
    Ajit Kumar Sinha (ed.) (2014). Proceedings of the Symposia on Philosophy. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    The present book “Proceedings of the Symposia on Philosophy” edited by Late Prof. Ajit Kumar Sinha is a scholarly work, published by the Department of Philosophy, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra in 1966. It is collection of papers presented by eminent scholars at two symposia held at the Department of Philosophy, Kurukshetra University, Kurukshetra on 22nd and on 23rd March, 1965. The symposium "Concept of Philosophy in the mid-twentieth century" was held on March 22, 1965, and the symposium "Critique of the Value-system (...)
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  30. added 2016-04-22
    Desh Raj Sirswal (ed.) (2011). Reconsidering Classical Indian Thoughts. Centre for Positive Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Studies (CPPIS), Pehowa (Kurukshetra).
    Recent years have seen the beginning of a radical reassessment of the philosophical literature of ancient and classical India. The analytical techniques of contemporary philosophy are being deployed towards a fresh and original interpretation of the texts. This rational rather than mystical approach towards Indian philosophical theories has resulted in a need to work which explains afresh its central methods, courses and devices. It is with this spirit of thought and background that I want to publish a book to discuss (...)
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  31. added 2016-04-21
    Huaiyu Wang (2016). Between Hierarchy of Oppression and Style of Nourishment: Defending the Confucian Way of Civil Order. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):559-596.
    Despite a growing interest in and sympathy with Confucianism, there remains a stereotyped conception of Confucian civil order as a form of authoritarian hierarchy that is responsible for various oppressions in ancient China and is reprehensible from a modern egalitarian perspective. One central target of this modern criticism is the Confucian maxim of sangang 三綱, whose underlying idea is essential for regulating the relationship between sovereign and subject, father and son, and husband and wife in traditional Confucian society. Tu Wei-ming (...)
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  32. added 2016-04-21
    Marcello Barison (2016). Rilke E l'Oriente by Daniela Liguori. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):653-655.
    Der Berg, a poem written between 1906 and 1907, is perhaps one of the most emblematic places to approach the relationship between Rainer Maria Rilke and the East. The mountain we are speaking of is Fujiyama, to which the celebrated Japanese painter Katsushika Hokusai dedicated two woodcut cycles. Presumably, Rilke came into contact with Japanese art through Edmond Goncourt, who had devoted precisely to Hokusai a major critical study in 1908. Another version of the story sees Rilke as having read (...)
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  33. added 2016-04-21
    Janis Eshots (2016). The Sufi Doctrine of Man: Ṣadr Al-Dīn Al-Qūnawī's Metaphysical Anthropology by Richard Todd. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):667-670.
    The examination of the works and views of Muḥy al-Dīn al-’Arabī’s spiritual heir Ṣadr al-Dīn al-Qūnawī, due to the notorious terseness of his style, is an extremely difficult task. In addition, al-Qūnawī expected the reader to be acquainted with the entire corpus of his works, since many important ideas are mentioned in only one of them, without ever being repeated elsewhere in his writings. In many cases, he limits himself to a brief allusion or hint, without discussing the point at (...)
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  34. added 2016-04-21
    Benjamin Huff (2016). Putting the Way Into Effect : Inward and Outward Concerns in Classical Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):418-448.
    Classical Confucian thought is deeply concerned, on the one hand, with individual moral self-cultivation and, on the other, with the widespread establishment of a moral social order. These twin aspirations find expression in the legends of Yao, Shun, King Wen, and other sage-kings who achieved perfection in both realms. Yet a serious tension arises, because despite Confucius’s and Mencius’s moral purity and devotion, their political impact is marginal. They consistently teach that humaneness and rightness will transform the world, and work (...)
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  35. added 2016-04-21
    Michael Nylan & Benjamin Daniels (2016). Exemplary Women of Early China: The Lienü Zhuan of Liu Xiang Transed. By Anne Behnke Kinney. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):662-666.
    A new translation of Liu Xiang’s 劉向 Lienü zhuan 列女傳 is long overdue.1 And most of the translation by Anne Behnke Kinney, Exemplary Women of Early China: The Lienü Zhuan of Liu Xiang, is very well done indeed. At the same time, Kinney has made a series of odd and clearly intentional choices when translating the classic, choices worth querying. Most importantly, she insists on translating the classic as if it directly addressed its readers, even if this insistence rides roughshod (...)
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  36. added 2016-04-21
    Sor-Hoon Tan (2016). Why Equality and Which Inequalities?: A Modern Confucian Approach to Democracy. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):488-514.
    Those who see Confucianism as a premodern imperial ideology or a traditional religion have no problem characterizing its social ideal as inherently hierarchical, as this is fairly typical of such systems of thought. From this perspective, rather than valuing equality Confucianism takes for granted inequalities among people, and justifies social hierarchies and unequal distribution of power, resources, prestige, and other goods as part of its ethics and its ideal of good government by sagely kings, the justification sometimes involving metaphysical claims (...)
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  37. added 2016-04-21
    Douglas L. Berger (2016). Categorisation in Indian Philosophy: Thinking Inside the Box Ed. By Jessica Frazier. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):655-660.
    In Categorisation in Indian Philosophy: Thinking Inside the Box, Jessica Frazier has brought together an impressive array of scholars who have contributed nine essays, plus an introductory and concluding chapter, both written by her, which collectively provide a most fruitful perspective for examining classical South Asian traditions of thought. Creating categorial frameworks was certainly a prolific activity among the ancient and medieval authors of the darśanas, and indeed these authors drew heavily from pre-scholastic texts and language to build (...)
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  38. added 2016-04-21
    Amy Donahue (2016). For the Cowherds: Coloniality and Conventional Truth in Buddhist Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):597-617.
    Comparative philosophers have noted that some comparative methods perpetuate colonial legacies. What follows employs aspects of the scholarship of Gayatri Chakravorty Spivak, Anîbal Quijano, and María Lugones to identify one colonially problematic methodology that some well-regarded contemporary comparative representations of “Buddhist Philosophy” arguably adopt. In 1995, Lin Tongqi, Henry Rosemont, Jr., and Roger Ames identified “the most fundamental methodological issue facing all comparativists” by raising and responding to the question: “Does the imposition of modern Western conceptual categories on non-Western patterns (...)
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  39. added 2016-04-21
    Charles Goodman (2016). Consequentialism, Particularism, and the Emptiness of Persons: A Response to Vishnu Sridharan. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):637-649.
    Many Indian Buddhist texts have a great deal to say about metaphysics, ontology, epistemology and the philosophy of language; many of them offer quite a bit of guidance about how to live, and about the qualities of mind and heart that are worthy of ethical commendation; but most of these texts say nothing at all about the topics that we today would classify as ethical theory and metaethics.Yet there was at least one Indian author who aspired to systematize Buddhist normative (...)
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  40. added 2016-04-21
    Gordon B. Mower (2016). Mengzi and Hume on Extending Virtue. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):475-487.
    The classical Chinese philosopher Mengzi shares the idea with David Hume that virtue and vice are dispositions of character that arise from original qualities of the mind. Mengzi is guardedly optimistic that these original qualities can be extended to become fully formed virtues, while Hume is guardedly skeptical about this same enterprise. Yet these two thinkers have something to share with each other. In this essay I will use illustrations from Mengzi to sketch out an interpretation of extending original moral (...)
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  41. added 2016-04-21
    Vishnu Sridharan (2016). Selfless Ethics: The Equality of Non-Existence. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):627-637.
    A number of scholars have attempted to situate the Buddha’s teachings within the primary Western ethical theories, namely consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics. One challenge that each has confronted is Buddhism’s emphasis on the ultimate non-existence of the self. In his writings, Charles Goodman has put forward an account of how the realization of the ultimate non-existence of the self would lead a practitioner to consequentialism. The present comment challenges the account offered by Goodman, and argues that an ethical-particularist account (...)
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  42. added 2016-04-21
    Choi Young-jin & Lee Haeng-Hoon (2016). The Confucian Vision of an Ideal Society Arising Out of Moral Emotions, with a Focus on the Sishu Daquan. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):394-417.
    Our discussion should open with a story in the “Weizi” 微子 chapter of the Analects. Confucius, while traveling on a long journey, sent his disciple Zi Lu 子路 to ask two hermits, Chang Zu 長沮 and Jie Ni 桀溺, where a ferry could be found. Sneering at Confucius for canvassing around the country, they retorted: “Turbulent waves are sweeping away everything under Heaven. With whom, then, are you to change the world?” Zi Lu reported their words back to Confucius, who (...)
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  43. added 2016-04-21
    The Cowherds (2016). Is Moonshadows Lunacy?: The Cowherds Respond. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):617-621.
    We thank Amy Donahue for her attention to our work, and we thank the editors of Philosophy East and West for an opportunity to reply. We confess that we were not sure whether to reply. On the one hand we believe that her critique is so misguided that it needs no reply; on the other hand, we were worried that others might take our silence as conceding her point. On reflection, we decided that the larger issue she raises is important (...)
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  44. added 2016-04-21
    Victor Forte (2016). Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism by Steven Heine. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):671-676.
    Steven Heine’s latest book on the history of kōans, Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism, is his second monograph dedicated to a single kōan case record. The author’s first such offering, Shifting Shape, Shaping Text: Philosophy and Folklore in the Fox Kōan, focused on the second case record of the thirteenth-century Gateless Gate collection. Published at the end of the 1990s the text was a response, in many ways, to the two authors who dominated (...)
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  45. added 2016-04-21
    Jinhua Jia (2016). From Human-Spirit Resonance to Correlative Modes: The Shaping of Chinese Correlative Thinking Jinhua Jia. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):449-474.
    Scholars have generally agreed that correlative thinking represents a defining feature of traditional Chinese thought, and their discussions on this enduring mode of thinking have led to a better understanding of the Chinese intellectual and cultural tradition. Although scholars have seldom looked into the causes of the formation of early Chinese correlative thought, some of their discussions have provided inspiration for further investigation.A number of scholars have indicated that the concept of resonance was a fundamental factor in Chinese correlative thinking. (...)
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  46. added 2016-04-21
    Esther Seidel (2016). Die Vision Eines Anderen Judentums: Ausgewählte Schriften by Francesca Yardenit Albertini, And: Deutschland Oder Jerusalem: Das Kurze Leben der Francesca Albertini by Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):685-694.
    It is not an easy task to review two recently published books by and about the late Jewish scholar Francesca Yardenit Albertini, who passed away so suddenly in 2011 at the young age of thirty-six.Albertini was not only a dear colleague with whom one felt connected through a common aim and vision resulting from a shared Jewish and philosophical perspective. She was also an enthusiastic scholar and lecturer with whom one would have liked to work on projects of mutual scholarly (...)
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  47. added 2016-04-21
    Roy Tseng (2016). The Idea of Freedom in Comparative Perspective: Critical Comparisons Between the Discourses of Liberalism and Neo-Confucianism. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):539-558.
    This essay aims to explore the meaning of freedom from a comparative perspective, focusing on critical comparisons between the discourses of liberalism and Neo-Confucianism. In so doing, my specific purpose is to characterize one of the possible, and perhaps the most plausible, presentations of Confucian liberalism as a perfectionist form of Hegelian liberalism. The contents are organized into three major sections.To begin with, thanks largely to Isaiah Berlin’s “Two Concepts of Liberty” and Chang Fo-ch’üan’s Tzu-yu yü jen-ch’üan, an asymmetry emerged (...)
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  48. added 2016-04-21
    Edwin Bryant (2016). Lord Śiva's Song: The Īśvara Gītā by Andrew J. Nicholson. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):660-662.
    The Īśvara Gītā, translated by Andrew J. Nicholson in Lord Śiva’s Song: The Īśvara Gītā, is a quintessentially Hindu post-Vedic devotional text. Extolling Lord Śiva as the highest Truth, it sets out to establish its credentials in ways typical of the devotional traditions: it is located in one of the Purāṇas, already considered to be the fifth Veda by the time of the Chandogya Upaniṣad, thereby appropriating the paramount sacrosanctity of the Śruti tradition. It adopts the setting of Sūta’s (...)
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  49. added 2016-04-21
    Amy Donahue (2016). Reply to the Cowherds: Serious Philosophical Engagement with and for Whom? Philosophy East and West 66 (2):621-626.
    In ordinary philosophical contexts, it is customary to abide by due processes. For example, we engage the particularities of arguments rather than contenting ourselves with cursory approximations of claims and positions. We reject conclusions by demonstrating that specific premises are suspect or that these premises do not offer valid support. We do not dismiss arguments against us on the basis of sentiment or through tu quoque arguments and other fallacies of diversion.In practice, however, these due processes do not extend equally (...)
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  50. added 2016-04-21
    Vishnu Sridharan (2016). Utility Monsters and the Distribution of Dharmas: A Reply to Charles Goodman. Philosophy East and West 66 (2):650-652.
    In both the Consequences of Compassion and his response to my article, Goodman outlines a consequentialist theory that is both coherent and, in many ways, compelling. One can imagine that out of a concern toward—as Goodman puts it—“the impersonal events which fill the world”, we will accept “momentary experiences as the morally significant units”, and our actions will aim to promote the existence of “good dharmas.” However, as this brief reply argues, Goodman’s equating of a consequentialism focused on good dharmas (...)
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