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Asian Philosophy

Edited by JeeLoo Liu (California State University, Fullerton)
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  1. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2016). Book Review Pages From the Past: Part 1. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (2):338.
    This slim yet elegant volume begins with accounts of Cicero and Alexander, and continues with the story of a millionaire who wanted to save for the next six generations, a rich man who broke caste barriers through a meal, a farmer who protected his cows transcending religious boundaries, a widow who lived frugally to save for digging a well in her village, dacoits who were more conscious of their reputation than others, a simpleton but generous person who gave up his (...)
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  2. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2015). Book Review The Buddhist Dead. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (1):198.
    The giving up of the body or suicide for spiritual reasons has been dealt with by James Benn and D Max Moermane. The relationships of the dead and the living are discussed by Bryan J Cuevas, John Cliff ord Holt, and Matthew T Kapstein, while Hank Glassman, Mark Rowe, and Jason A Carbine talk about different funeral practices. With glossaries for Chinese, Japanese, and Korean characters and an elaborate index, this book is a unique peek into Buddhist practices regarding the (...)
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  3. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2015). Book Review Fate and Fortune in the Indian Scriptures. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (3):293-4.
    The author could have shown the other perspective also where fate or fortune is proclaimed to be in the hands of a person. It is notable that almost all of the translations and works she cites are by authors from outside the Indian tradition, with a Semitic bearing on their thought. The author comes a bit too strongly and without sufficient background material, in brushing aside as inconsequential, years of thought and philosophising in the Indian tradition. However, no Eastern tradition (...)
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  4. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2015). Book Review Dharma: Its Early History in Law, Religion, and Narrative. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (3):293.
    This book aims to give a better understanding of dharma through an extraordinarily exhaustive account of both the word and the concept through an incisive analysis of Vedic, Buddhist, Puranic, Smriti, and bhakti texts, and even some works of literature.
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  5. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2015). Book Review Sir John Woodroffe, Tantra and Bengal: An Indian Soul in a European Body? [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 2015 (3):294-5.
    The result of the doctoral work of the author, this volume reflects well her painstaking eff orts of the investigative trail into the life of Sir John Woodroffe. This book gives a concise yet overall view of the large and multifarious canvas of the personality that Woodroffe was. Including rare photographs, facsimiles of letters and notes, an elaborate bibliography and index, this book fills a void by fulfilling the long-felt need of a good biography of a soul, who preferred to (...)
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  6. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2015). Book Review Divine Self, Human Self: The Philosophy of Being in Two Gītā Commentaries. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 120 (3):293.
    The author tries to interpret their commentaries on the Gita to ‘develop two competing visions of the relationship between metaphysics and theology, and therefore of how one may relate inquiry to faith’ (xx). In this task, the author has been remarkably successful and he also gives us a wonderful comparative study of Shankara and Ramanuja. Anyone interested in these two thinkers should definitely read this volume.
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  7. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2014). Book Review Management A New Look—Lessons From Sarada Ma’s Life and Teaching. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (9):552.
    The present book attempts to look out for management lessons in Holy Mother’s life. The author is a disciple of Sri Akshaya Chaitanya who was himself a disciple and biographer of Holy Mother. This book is thus a product of inspired effort. Various facets of the Holy Mother’s personality have been traced through incidents from her life and these have been classified into different sections such as planning, organisation, motivation, leadership, decision-making, communication, and inspiration.
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  8. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2014). Book Review The Journal of Oriental Research, Madras, 2010-2012. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (8):504.
    The Journal of Oriental Research was started in 1927 by Prof. S Kuppuswami Sastri, who was also the founder of the Kuppuswami Sastri Research Institute. Originally an annual journal, its regularity has been disturbed due to financial difficulties. Th e present issue comprises volumes eighty-three to eighty-four and has been funded by the Dr V Raghavan Memorial Endowment.
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  9. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2014). Book Review The Rainforest or From Protozoa to God. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (9):551.
    The present book lacks both purpose and depth. It is nothing more than a pointer to thinking beyond the established constructs and is another example of how a profound thought can be marred at the hands of inefficient writers and editors.
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  10. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2014). Book Review Bodhisattvas of the Forest and the Formation of the Mahāyāna. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (8):502-4.
    A unique aspect of this book is that it ventures into an analysis of the extant translations of the Rashtrapalapariprichchha Sutra. Delineating the shortcomings of these translations, Boucher gives a new translation based on Sanskrit and Chinese texts of the sutra. We are reminded that translations differ not only because of the target language but also because of the milieu from which the translation is done. The new annotated translation of the Rashtrapalapariprichchha Sutra is lucid and an easy read. Boucher (...)
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  11. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2014). Book Review Lectures on Patañjali’s Mahābhāsya Volumes IX and X P S Subrahmanya Sastri. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 119 (6):405.
    The ninth volume contains ahnikas, divisions, forty-two to forty-seven, and the tenth volume contains ahnikas forty-eight to fifty-six. Each Panini sutra is followed by the relevant bhashya, commentary, and the varttika, annotation, of Vararuchi. Each volume has indexes of the sutras, varttikas, nyayas, paribhashas, and important Sanskrit and English words.
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  12. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2013). Book Review Man in Search of Immortality: Testimonials From the Hindu Scriptures. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 118 (1):164.
    In five articles Swami Nikhilananda shows the eternal nature of the soul, its three states, and the real nature of Being. Lucidly written, the book brings modern motifs to elucidate traditional beliefs. An appendix of quotations from the Bhagavadgita and Upanishads and an index adds to its value.
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  13. added 2016-08-24
    Swami Narasimhananda (2013). Book Review The Labyrinth of Solitude. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 118 (5):360-1.
    Bred in an intellectual and practising tradition, the author explores layers of dharma, with its meanings and influences, from the ancient to the present. He juxtaposes and contextualises this concept based on the Mahabharata and relates it to the problems of life vis-à-vis social strata. The work analyses philosophical concepts, readings, and re-readings in a novel way. The sceptre and solace of dharma are depicted and the political interpretation in the Indian Constitution is traced.
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  14. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2016). Svarajya Siddhih of Gangadharendra Saraswati–Attaining Self Dominion 21. Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 121 (4):421–2.
    Translation and Annotation of 'Svarajya Siddhi' of Gangadharendra Sarasvati from the nineteenth century. This text is considered one of the five Siddhi texts, the other four being Naishkarmya Siddhi, Advaita Siddhi, Ishta Siddhi, and Brahma Siddhi. These texts have a very great value in Advaita Vedanta.
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  15. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2013). Book Review Introduction to Hindu Dharma. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 118 (1):163-4.
    The present book is a painstaking labour of love displaying a selection of the Tamil discourses of Chandrasekharendra Saraswati Swamigal, the 68th pontiff of the Kanchi Kamakoti Peetham, Kanchipuram, one of the great Hindu religious leaders of the last century. These discourses have been translated into English, edited, and topically arranged. The editor deserves special commendation for this marvellous work which has been culled from a transcript of more than 6,500 pages.
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  16. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2012). Book Review Great Thinkers on Ramakrishna Vivekananda. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (6):333.
    This book documents the sublime and deep thoughts of great people worldwide on Sri Ramakrishna and Swami Vivekananda. While some had the privilege of meeting these divine personages, others have been deeply influenced by their life and teachings. A revised edition of the earlier book, this volume contains much new material like facsimiles of the tributes of Mahatma Gandhi and Rabindranath Tagore.
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  17. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2012). Book Review Swaraj: Thoughts of Gandhi, Tilak, Aurobindo, Raja Rammohun Roy, Tagore & Vivekananda. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 117 (2):140.
    In this book the author has equated Swaraj with Mahatma Gandhi’s ‘self-rule’, Bal Gangadhar Tilak’s ‘birthright for freedom’, Aurobindo’s ‘Sanatana Dharma’, Raja Rammohun Roy’s ‘individual liberty’, Rabindranath Tagore’s ‘humanity’, and Swami Vivekananda’s ‘love of the motherland’.
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  18. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2011). Book Review How to Organize Life? [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 116 (6):466-7.
    This book is a compilation of various articles published in the special issue of the English journal 'The Vedanta Kesari' of December 2002. Many monks and other thinkers have put forth their ideas on various methods to organise our lives.
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  19. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2011). Book Review Towards the Goal. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 116 (1):228.
    This book is the history of the beginning of the Vedanta movement in Australia leading to the founding of the Vedanta Society in Sydney. The book brings out the undying spirit of the members of the Vedanta group in Australia and their unremitting efforts at spearheading the movement.
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  20. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2011). Book Review Holy Mother, Swamiji, and Direct Disciples at Madras. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 116 (5):419.
    The book under review is a compilation of various accounts of the stay of Sri Sarada Devi, and Swamis Vivekananda, Brahmananda, Shivananda, Ramakrishnananda, Abhedananda, Vijnanananda, Subodhananda, Niranjanananda, Turiyananda, Trigunatitananda, and Premananda in the city.
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  21. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review How to Seek God. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (4):309.
    Book Review of How to Seek God by Swami Yatiswarananda.
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  22. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review Social Philosophy of Swami Vivekananda. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (11):647.
    This book tries to collate the different ideas of socialistic thought contained in the vast corpus of Swami Vivekananda's writings and speeches. His humanism led to numerous social activities with the idea that God is present in human beings. He said that education was the solution to all social problems.
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  23. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review Srimad Bhagavata: Condensed in the Poet's Own Words. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (6):406.
    Book review of 'Srimad Bhagavata—Condensed in the Poet's Words' by A M Srinivasachariar. In this book, the Sanskrit Bhagavata verses have been condensed without using any words other those of the original. This has been translated into English by V Raghavan. This book enables one to have an idea of the main content of the lengthier original text.
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  24. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review Jivanmukti Viveka of Vidyaranya. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (9):551.
    This book is a new translation of Jivanmukti Viveka by Vidyaranya by Swami Harshananda, Ramakrishna Math, Bangalore. This translation is lucid and helps one to understand clearly the various subtle nuances of the original Sanskrit text. The original translation was into Kannada, which has been translated into English by H Ramachandra Swamy.
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  25. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review Self Knowledge. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (11):647.
    This book is the retelling of the tenets of Advaita Vedanta in the light of Sri Ramana Maharishi's teachings by Nome in simple and poetic English. This gives one access to these eternal truths in a simple and lucid language.
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  26. added 2016-08-23
    Swami Narasimhananda (2010). Book Review The Mahabharata: Condensed in the Poet's Own Words. [REVIEW] Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 115 (6):406.
    Book review of 'The Mahabharata—Condensed in the Poet's Words' by A M Srinivasachariar. In this book, the Sanskrit Mahabharata verses have been condensed without using any words other those of the original. This has been translated into English by V Raghavan. This book enables one to have an idea of the main content of the lengthier original text.
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  27. added 2016-08-18
    Ian M. Sullivan (2016). Simone de Beauvoir and Confucian Role Ethics: Role‐Relational Ambiguity and Confucian Mystification. Hypatia 31 (3):620-635.
    This article argues that there has been a general misunderstanding of the nature of role relations in Confucian role ethics. Recasting constitutive role relations in light of Beauvoir's ethics of ambiguity will aid in developing Confucian role ethics as a contemporary vision of human flourishing that can internally accommodate the need for a feminist transformation.
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  28. added 2016-08-13
    Arnab Banerjee, Empiricism in Indian Philosophy.
    it is about Indian philosophical view of empiricism. i tried to show what indian philosophers say about empirical knowledge.
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  29. added 2016-08-09
    André Couture (forthcoming). Sāṃkhya and Yoga: Towards an Integrative Approach. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-16.
    Sāṃkhya and yoga are normally discussed either as topics in philosophy or as subjects of historical and philological inquiry. In this paper, I will attempt to demonstrate that, before separate developments appeared in the areas of both sāṃkhya and yoga, at least some brahmins seemed to have espoused the idea that any physical exertion or harnessing to a specific task had to be preceded by an intellectual approach to reality and possibly by a thorough enumeration of its principles. I come (...)
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  30. added 2016-08-09
    Jing Liu (2016). What is Nature? – Ziran in Early Daoist Thinking. Asian Philosophy 26 (3):265-279.
    ABSTRACTThe question of the relation between humans and nature lies at the foundation of any philosophy. With the daily worsening environmental crisis, we are forced to face this ancient question again. Yet when we put it into the form of ‘humans and nature’, a metaphysics is already implied and the problem of nature has not yet been questioned. At this moment, the very question that needs to be put forward is, ‘What is nature’? The question of nature will be interrogated (...)
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  31. added 2016-08-09
    David W. Johnson (2016). Watsuji’s Topology of the Self. Asian Philosophy 26 (3):216-240.
    ABSTRACTThis essay critically develops Watsuji’s nondual ontology of the self through the lens of ‘topological’ thought. Through close description of the embeddedness of the self in, and its emergence from, an intersubjective space which, in turn, is rooted in a particular place, Watsuji shows that the self is constituted by its relational contact with others, on the one hand, and by its immersion in a wider geo-cultural environment, on the other. Yet Watsuji himself had difficulty in smoothly bringing together and (...)
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  32. added 2016-08-03
    Shaoling Ma (2014). Sinologism: An Alternative to Orientalism and Postcolonialism. By Ming Dong Gu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (S1):770-774.
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  33. added 2016-07-30
    Niranjan Saha (forthcoming). Vedāntic Commentaries on the Bhagavadgītā as a Component of Three Canonical Texts. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-24.
    The Vedānta philosophy has its roots in scriptural sources, specifically, in three canonical texts, viz. the Brahmasūtra-s by Bādarāyaṇa, which is called nyāya-prasthāna or tarka-prasthāna; the Upaniṣad-s, which are called the śruti-prasthāna; and the Bhagavadgītā, which is regarded as the smṛti-prasthāna. Thus, like the first two constituents of this trio, the third one has a tangible legacy of commentarial tradition; as almost all well-known advocates of the Vedānta schools have commented on these three sourcebooks. In this paper, an attempt has (...)
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  34. added 2016-07-26
    Stephen Phillips (2016). Creative Commentary. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1020-1026.
    Engagement with texts however distant from us in culture and history—distant, that is, from contemporary anglophone philosophy—tries to make them part of an ongoing conversation, focusing on topics and arguments as opposed to context or history. And, as Jonardon Ganeri reports of the innovative Nyāya philosopher Raghunātha Śiromaṇi, who emerges as the hero of The Lost Age of Reason: Philosophy in Early Modern India 1450–1700, this can take the form of “asides and marginal notes, of the sort one makes not (...)
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  35. added 2016-07-26
    Roger T. Ames & Peter D. Hershock (2016). Introduction. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):699-703.
    This special issue of Philosophy East and West is dedicated to the inaugural meeting of the World Consortium for Research in Confucian Cultures, convened at the University of Hawai‘i and the East-West Center, October 8-12, 2014, on the theme “Confucian Values in a Changing World Cultural Order,” to explore the contributions of Confucian thought to world culture. The conference brought together leading scholars from partner institutions around the world to explore critically the meaning and value of Confucian culture in the (...)
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  36. added 2016-07-26
    Paul J. D'Ambrosio (2016). Approaches to Global Ethics: Michael Sandel's Justice and Li Zehou's Harmony. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):720-738.
    In recent years Michael Sandel’s communitarian criticism of John Rawls’s theory of justice has gained much attention in philosophical circles. Specifically, he takes issue with the conception of the self—implicit in Rawls’s “veil of ignorance”: an extraction of the individual from their social environment, which creates an “unencumbered self” that is then used to theorize about justice. Sandel believes that some social ties are so deeply embedded in the human experience that even hypothetical isolation of the individual is likely to (...)
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  37. added 2016-07-26
    Ming Dong Gu (2016). Confucian Ethics and the Spirit of World Order: A Reconception of the Chinese Way of Tolerance. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):787-804.
    No new global order without a new global ethic!Since the ending of the Cold War, the world has not gone in the direction of peace, harmony, stability, and cohesion. If during the Cold War period the world was divided into two large camps, it has today fragmented into many regions in strife, conflict, and war. Instead of a centripetal force that works toward a global unity accompanying the process of globalization, we are witnessing a centrifugal force that tears different countries (...)
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  38. added 2016-07-26
    George L. Israel (2016). The Renaissance of Wang Yangming Studies in the People's Republic of China. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1001-1019.
    The revival of Confucianism in China since the Reform and Opening is a topic that has received much scholarly attention. Beginning in the 1980s, this revival has included the establishment of a multitude of research institutes and study societies; local, national, and international conferences and symposiums; the restoration of historical sites; the introduction of a Confucian curriculum into schools; and an increasingly voluminous scholarship.1 Reasons for the revival include government policy and the search for “a new source of ideological legitimacy (...)
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  39. added 2016-07-26
    Eric S. Nelson (2016). Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun by Kim Iryŏp. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1049-1051.
    Kim Iryŏp was raised and initially educated in a devout Methodist Christian environment under the strict guidance of her fideistic pastor father and her mother, who believed in female education. Both parents died while she was in her teens, and she questioned her Christian faith at an early age. She was one of the first Korean women to pursue higher education in Korea and Japan. Kim became a prolific poet and essayist, her writings engaging cultural and social issues, and a (...)
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  40. added 2016-07-26
    Evan Thompson (2016). Précis of Waking, Dreaming, Being: Self and Consciousness in Neuroscience, Meditation, and Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):927-933.
    The central idea of Waking, Dreaming, Being is that the self is a process, not a thing or an entity.1 The self isn’t something outside experience, hidden either in the brain or in some immaterial realm. It is an experiential process that is subject to constant change. We enact a self in the process of awareness, and this self comes and goes depending on how we are aware.When we’re awake and occupied with some manual task, we enact a bodily self (...)
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  41. added 2016-07-26
    R. A. Carleo (2016). Huiying Sangde'er Ji Qita 回應桑德爾及其他 by Li Zehou. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1027-1029.
    Do not be misled. Despite its title, Li Zehou’s Huiying Sangde’er ji qita 回應桑德爾及其他 only rarely engages the thought of its supposed object, Michael Sandel. Rather, this informal text, which takes the form of an interview or dialogue, appropriates Sandel as a means of discussing and critiquing the modern Western philosophical tradition in general. Rather than examining the Harvard professor’s actual arguments, Li brings up the hypothetical moral quandaries and discussions Sandel works with as a means of asserting his own (...)
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  42. added 2016-07-26
    Germaine A. Hoston (2016). Une Modernité Indigène: Ruptures Et Innovations Dans les Théories Politiques Japonaise du Xviii E Siècle by Olivier Ansart. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1029-1032.
    Une modernité indigène: Ruptures et innovations dans les théories politiques japonaise du xviiie siècle, by Olivier Ansart, is a thoughtful, elegantly written book that offers valuable insights into Japanese political thought in an era that culminated in the Meiji Restoration. Despite the specific characteristics of the rigid centralized feudal structure of Tokugawa society, Ansart argues, political ideas generally associated with the advent of “modernity” in the West were generated indigenously in a context in which knowledge of the West was limited (...)
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  43. added 2016-07-26
    Yaser Mirdamadi (2016). The Misty Land of Ideas and the Light of Dialogue: An Anthology of Comparative Philosophy: Western & Islamic Ed. By Ali Paya. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):1038-1040.
    At a time when the ‘end’ of comparative philosophy has been announced1 or comparative philosophy has been taken to be a pragmatic enterprise, implying the ‘end’ of a realist interpretation of comparative philosophy,2 the book under review here, The Misty Land of Ideas and the Light of Dialogue: An Anthology of Comparative Philosophy: Western & Islamic, edited by Ali Paya, appears to be aiming at bucking the trend. It sets out, according to its editor, to contribute to a realist conception (...)
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  44. added 2016-07-26
    John Ramsey (2016). Confucian Role Ethics and Relational Autonomy in the Mengzi. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):903-922.
    This essay examines whether Confucian role ethics offers resources to identify and redress gender inequality and oppression. On its face, Confucian role ethics seems ill suited for this task for two reasons. First, a central tenet of role ethics is that a person is constituted by her roles. Because roles are constituted by norms that govern them, many social roles are, and have been, historically oppressive. Second, discussions of Confucian role ethics tend to avoid talk of autonomy, yet autonomy is (...)
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  45. added 2016-07-26
    Jennifer M. Windt (2016). Dreaming, Imagining, and First-Person Methods in Philosophy: Commentary on Evan Thompson's Waking, Dreaming, Being. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):959-981.
    Evan’s book is in many ways an exercise in remapping. The first is suggested by the book’s title. Waking, Dreaming, Being challenges existing ways of mapping the conceptual relationship between conscious states across the sleep-wake cycle. The idea that waking and dreaming are not discrete states but can interpenetrate each other—that, to use Evan’s words, they “aren’t opposed but flow into and out of [one] an other” —is a central theme running through the book. If Evan is correct, then the (...)
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  46. added 2016-07-26
    Nicholas S. Brasovan (2016). Considerations For A Confucian Ecological Humanism. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):842-860.
    My thesis is based on the methodological assumption that the Analects of Confucius should be interpreted within the greater context of the Four Books, Five Classics, Xunzi, and works of Neo-Confucian literati. Here I argue that the Analects can be consistently modeled as an environmental ethics of weak anthropocentrism so long as it is read according to two provisos: first, that “weak anthropocentrism” be used in its standard sense in the context of contemporary environmental ethics, and, second, that the hermeneutic (...)
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  47. added 2016-07-26
    John D. Dunne (2016). Comments on Waking, Dreaming, Being by Evan Thompson. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):934-942.
    Evan Thompson’s Waking, Dreaming, Being is an outstanding work that richly deserves the widespread praise that it is receiving. The book exhibits exquisite balance between various poles: science and philosophy, “East” and “West,” the accessible and the specialized, the physical and the emergent, and so on. It is also a remarkably readable book, and since academic literature is littered with many unreadable must-read tomes, I am grateful for the change of pace. In short, those who have not yet read Waking, (...)
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  48. added 2016-07-26
    Kurtis G. Hagen (2016). Would Early Confucians Really Support Humanitarian Interventions? Philosophy East and West 66 (3):818-841.
    Many scholars view Confucianism as relatively open to war, as a legitimate tool for maintaining order and rescuing oppressed peoples. Indeed, it is not uncommon for statements such as the following to be presented as though they were straightforward matters of fact: “Confucians would approve the use of force by one state against another state for the protection against abusive rule in the latter if properly carried out”.1 Such claims find support in the work of Daniel A. Bell, Tongdong Bai, (...)
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  49. added 2016-07-26
    Jinhua Jia (2016). Li Zehou's Reconception of the Confucian Ethics of Emotion. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):757-786.
    Li Zehou 李澤厚, one of the outstanding contemporary thinkers, coins the term “emotio-rational structure” for his ethical theory. Li emphasizes a balanced and integrated structure of emotion and reason, and the core of this structure is an innovative combination of Kantian rationalism and Confucian ethics. Li admires Immanuel Kant’s rational ontology of ethics, but criticizes his exclusion of human emotion and desire. Li advocates complementing Kantian rationalism with the Confucian ethics of emotion, which he calls “emotion as substance”. He believes (...)
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  50. added 2016-07-26
    U. Edward McDougall (2016). Everydayness, Divinity, and the Sacred: Shinto and Heidegger. Philosophy East and West 66 (3):883-902.
    The sacred or holy is central to Heidegger’s later writings, “The Thing” and “Building Dwelling Thinking” taking it as their focus. This aspect of his philosophy is often viewed as lacking in coherence1 or an attempt to return to Ancient Greek religion.2 Heideggerian notions of the gods or the sacred have frequently been dismissed or neglected, with even sympathetic commentators like Julian Young playing down their importance.Heidegger’s later thought, however, represents one of the most radical attempts to critically rethink divinity (...)
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