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  1. R. T. Allen (1991). Passivity and the Rationality of Emotion. Modern Schoolman 68 (4):321-330.
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  2. Oded Balaban (1997). Toward a Rationality of Emotions. International Studies in Philosophy 29 (2):145-146.
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  3. Aaron Ben-Ze'ev (2010). The Rationality and Functionality of Emotions. The European Legacy 5 (1):49-63.
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  4. John Benson (1967). Emotion and Expression. Philosophical Review 76 (3):335-357.
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  5. F. M. Berenson (1992). Emotions and Rationality. The Personalist Forum 8 (Supplement):175-185.
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  6. Brian Bruya (2001). Emotion, Desire, and Numismatic Experience in Descartes, Zhu Xi, and Wang Yangming. Ming Qing Yanjiu 2001:45-75.
    In this article, I explore the relationship between desire and emotion in Descartes, Zhu Xi, and Wang Yangming with the aim of demonstrating 1) that Zhu Xi, by keying on the detriments of selfishness, represents an improvement over the more sweeping Cartesian suggestion to control desires in general; and 2) that Wang Yangming, in turn, represents an improvement over Zhu Xi by providing a more sophisticated hermeneutic of the cosmology of desire.
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  7. N. F. Bunnin (1973). Emotion and Object. Philosophical Books 14 (2):30-33.
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  8. Marcia Cavell (1989). The Structure of Emotions; and Ronald de Sousa: The Rationality of Emotions by Robert M. Gordon. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophy 86 (9):493-504.
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  9. Eric Dayton (1995). W. George Turski, Toward a Rationality of Emotions: An Essay in the Philosophy of Mind Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 15 (3):218-220.
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  10. Ronald B. de Sousa (1987). The Rationality of Emotion. MIT Press.
    In this urbane and witty book, Ronald de Sousa disputes the widespread notion that reason and emotion are natural antagonists.
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  11. Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (2002). Fear and the Focus of Attention. Consciousness and Emotion 3 (2):105-144.
    Philosophers have not been very preoccupied by the link between emotions and attention. The few that did (de Sousa, 1987) never really specified the relation between the two phenomena. Using empirical data from the study of the emotion of fear, we provide a description (and an explanation) of the links between emotion and attention. We also discuss the nature (empirical or conceptual) of these links.
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  12. Sven Ove Hansson (forthcoming). Editorial: Rationality and Emotions. Theoria.
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  13. Larry A. Herzberg (2009). Direction, Causation, and Appraisal Theories of Emotion. Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):167 – 186.
    Appraisal theories of emotion generally presuppose that emotions are “directed at” various items. They also hold that emotions have motivational properties. However, although it coheres well with their views, they have yet to seriously develop the idea that the function of emotional direction is to guide those properties. I argue that this “guidance hypothesis” can open up a promising new field of research in emotion theory. But I also argue that before appraisal theorists can take full advantage of it, they (...)
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  14. R. M. K. (1973). Emotion and Object. [REVIEW] Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):166-167.
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  15. Mark Lance & Alessandra Tanesini (2004). Emotion and Rationality. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (Supplement):275-295.
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  16. Paisley Livingston (2002). Rationality and Emotion. SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 3 (2):7-24.
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  17. K. R. M. (1973). Emotion and Object. Review of Metaphysics 27 (1):166-167.
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  18. Linda L. McAlister (1974). Emotion and Object. International Studies in Philosophy 6:205-207.
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  19. Alfred Mele (1989). The Rationality of Emotion. Philosophical Books 30 (1):39-40.
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  20. Raphaël Micheli (2010). Emotions as Objects of Argumentative Constructions. Argumentation 24 (1):1-17.
    This paper takes part in the ongoing debate on how emotions can be dealt with by argumentation theory. Its main goal is to formulate a relationship between emotion and argumentation which differs from that usually found in most of the literature on the subject. In the “standard” conception, emotions are seen as the objects of appeals which function as adjuvants to argumentation: speakers appeal to pity, fear, shame and the like in order to enhance the cogency of an argument which (...)
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  21. Adam Morton (2012). Emotional Truth. By Ronald de Sousa. (Oxford UP, 2011. Pp. Xviii + 391. Price £38.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):220-222.
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  22. Hichem Naar (2011). Review: Emotional Truth, Ronald de Sousa. [REVIEW] Metapsychology Online Reviews.
    Emotional Truth is de Sousa's second book on emotion. The Rationality of Emotion (1987) is to be counted among the classics in the now thriving field of the philosophy of emotion. Emotional Truth is a natural sequel; it not only expands on some of the ideas presented in de Sousa's older book, but presents new highly stimulating and often intriguing ideas as well. De Sousa's writing, although at times a bit hard to follow and unnecessarily technical, is insightful, witty and (...)
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  23. Sophie Rietti (2009). Rationalities of Emotion–Defending, Distinguishing, Connecting. Organon F 16 (1):38-61.
    Claims that emotions are or can be rational, and crucially enabling of rationality, are now fairly common, also outside of philosophy, but with considerable diversity both in their assumptions about emotions and their conceptions of rationality. Three main trends are worth picking out, both in themselves and for the potential tensions between them: accounts that defend a case for the rationality of emotions A) by assimilating emotions closely to beliefs or judgements; B) in terms of the very features that traditional (...)
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  24. R. C. Roberts (2012). Emotional Truth, by Ronald de Sousa. Mind 121 (483):795-798.
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  25. Robert C. Roberts (1992). Emotions and Reasons: An Inquiry Into Emotional Justification. Philosophical Books 31 (4):233-235.
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  26. Jenefer M. Robinson (1989). Ronald de Sousa, The Rationality of Emotion Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 9 (6):224-228.
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  27. Jerome Shaffer (1991). The Rationality of Emotion. Review of Metaphysics 44 (3):624-628.
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  28. Ronald De Sousa (1979). The Rationality of Emotions. Dialogue 18 (1):41-63.
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  29. Fabrice Teroni (2011). Plus Ou Moins: Emotions Et Valence. In Christine Tappolet, Fabrice Teroni & Anita Konzelmann Ziv (eds.), Les ombres de l'âme: Penser les émotions négatives. Markus Haller. 21-36.
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  30. Irving Thalberg (1964). Emotion and Thought. American Philosophical Quarterly 1 (January):45-55.
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  31. Dwight Waldo (1942). Graham Wallas: Reason and Emotion in Social Change. Journal of Social Philosophy and Jurisprudence 7:142-160.
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  32. Douglas Walton (1992). The Place of Emotion in Argument. Penn State University Press.
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Emotion and Reason
  1. Felicia Ackerman (1998). Flourish Your Heart in This World: Emotion, Reason, and Action in Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):182-226.
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  2. Jesus Aguilar & Andrei A. Buckareff (eds.) (2009). Philosophy of Action: 5 Questions. Automatic Press/VIP.
  3. R. T. Allen (1991). Passivity and the Rationality of Emotion. Modern Schoolman 68 (4):321-330.
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  4. Robert Audi (1977). The Rational Assessment of Emotions. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):115-119.
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  5. C. Badcock (2004). Emotion Verses Reason as a Genetic Conflict. In D. Evans & Pierre Cruse (eds.), Emotion, Evolution, and Rationality. Oxford University Press.
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  6. Carla Bagnoli (ed.) (2011). Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
    What is their relation to practical rationality? Are they roots of our identity or threats to our autonomy? This volume is born out of the conviction that philosophy provides a distinctive approach to these problems.
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  7. Harold W. Baillie (1988). Learning the Emotions. New Scholasticism 62 (2):221-227.
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  8. Richard Barrett (1994). On Emotion as a Lapse From Rationality. Journal of Moral Education 23 (2):135-143.
    Robert Solomon, a philosopher noted for arguing the conciliation of reason and emotion, holds that emotions which are a lapse from rationality are unimportant. Their importance is supported here. Emotional habits of discourse, as well as of action, are discussed, unlike in most treatments of reason and emotion. The implication for cognitive and moral education is that the ability to engage in rational discussion, and the discipline to maintain application to difficult tasks, are seen as potentially curtailed by emotional habits (...)
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  9. Volkert Beekman (2006). Feeling Food: The Rationality of Perception. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (3):301-312.
    Regulatory bodies tend to treat people’s emotional responses towards foods as a nuisance for rational opinion-formation and decision-making. This position is thought to be supported by such evidence as: (1) people showing negative emotional responses to the idea of eating meat products from vaccinated livestock; and (2) people showing positive emotional responses to Magnum’s “7 sins” marketing campaign. Such cases are thought to support the idea that regulatory communication about foods should abstract from people’s emotional perceptions and that corporate marketing (...)
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  10. Elizabeth Belfiore (1986). Wine and Catharsis of the Emotions in Plato's Laws. Classical Quarterly 36 (02):421-.
    Plato's views on tragedy depend in large part on his views about the ethical consequences of emotional arousal. In the Republic, Plato treats the desires we feel in everyday life to weep and feel pity as appetites exactly like those for food or sex, whose satisfactions are ‘replenishments’. Physical desire is not reprehensible in itself, but is simply non-rational, not identical with reason but capable of being brought into agreement with it. Some desires, like that for simple and wholesome food, (...)
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  11. A. Ben-ze'ev (2003). The Logic of Emotions. In A. Hatimoysis (ed.), Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press. 147-162.
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  12. Monika Betzler (2007). Making Sense of Actions Expressing Emotions. Dialectica 61 (3):447–466.
    Actions expressing emotions pose a notorious challenge to those concerned with the rational explanation of action. The standard view has it that an agent's desires and means‐end beliefs rationally explain his actions, in the sense that his desire‐belief conglomerates are seen as reasons for which he acts. In light of this view, philosophers are divided on the question of whether actions expressing emotions fall short of being rational, or whether the standard model simply needs to be revised to accommodate them (...)
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  13. John Birtchnell (2003). The Two of Me: The Rational Outer Me and the Emotional Inner Me. Routledge.
    This book attempts to answer the question: How much of what we do is the result of conscious and deliberate decisions and how much originates in unconscious, unthought out, automatic directives? The answer is that far more than what we might imagine falls into the second category. We tend to assume responsibility for our unconsciously determined thoughts and actions, and even though we do not know why we think and act the way we do, we make up reasons for it, (...)
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  14. C. Bobonich (2001). Reason and Emotion: Essays on Ancient Moral Psychology. Philosophical Review 110 (2):263-267.
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  15. Nicolao Bonini, Rob Ranyard & Luigi Mittone (2009). Special Issue on “Cognition and Emotion in Economic Decision Making”. Mind and Society 8 (1):1-6.
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  16. Michael S. Brady (2011). Emotions, Perceptions, and Reasons. In Carla Bagnoli (ed.), Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
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  17. Michael S. Brady (2009). The Irrationality of Recalcitrant Emotions. Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
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  18. Michael S. Brady (2008). Value and Fitting Emotions. Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (4):465-475.
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