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  1. John Benson (1967). Emotion and Expression. Philosophical Review 76 (3):335-357.
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  2. Brian Bruya (2001). Emotion, Desire, and Numismatic Experience in Descartes, Zhu Xi, and Wang Yangming. Ming Qing Yanjiu 2001:45-75.
    In this article, I explore the relationship between desire and emotion in Descartes, Zhu Xi, and Wang Yangming with the aim of demonstrating 1) that Zhu Xi, by keying on the detriments of selfishness, represents an improvement over the more sweeping Cartesian suggestion to control desires in general; and 2) that Wang Yangming, in turn, represents an improvement over Zhu Xi by providing a more sophisticated hermeneutic of the cosmology of desire.
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  3. Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (2002). Fear and the Focus of Attention. Consciousness and Emotion 3 (2):105-144.
    Philosophers have not been very preoccupied by the link between emotions and attention. The few that did (de Sousa, 1987) never really specified the relation between the two phenomena. Using empirical data from the study of the emotion of fear, we provide a description (and an explanation) of the links between emotion and attention. We also discuss the nature (empirical or conceptual) of these links.
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  4. Larry A. Herzberg (2009). Direction, Causation, and Appraisal Theories of Emotion. Philosophical Psychology 22 (2):167 – 186.
    Appraisal theories of emotion generally presuppose that emotions are “directed at” various items. They also hold that emotions have motivational properties. However, although it coheres well with their views, they have yet to seriously develop the idea that the function of emotional direction is to guide those properties. I argue that this “guidance hypothesis” can open up a promising new field of research in emotion theory. But I also argue that before appraisal theorists can take full advantage of it, they (...)
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  5. Hichem Naar (2011). Review: Emotional Truth, Ronald de Sousa. [REVIEW] Metapsychology Online Reviews.
    Emotional Truth is de Sousa's second book on emotion. The Rationality of Emotion (1987) is to be counted among the classics in the now thriving field of the philosophy of emotion. Emotional Truth is a natural sequel; it not only expands on some of the ideas presented in de Sousa's older book, but presents new highly stimulating and often intriguing ideas as well. De Sousa's writing, although at times a bit hard to follow and unnecessarily technical, is insightful, witty and (...)
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  6. Fabrice Teroni (2011). Plus Ou Moins: Emotions Et Valence. In Christine Tappolet, Fabrice Teroni & Anita Konzelmann Ziv (eds.), Les ombres de l'âme: Penser les émotions négatives. Markus Haller. 21-36.
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Emotion and Reason
  1. Felicia Ackerman (1998). Flourish Your Heart in This World: Emotion, Reason, and Action in Malory's Le Morte D'Arthur. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 22 (1):182-226.
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  2. Jesus Aguilar & Andrei A. Buckareff (eds.) (2009). Philosophy of Action: 5 Questions. Automatic Press/VIP.
  3. R. T. Allen (1991). Passivity and the Rationality of Emotion. Modern Schoolman 68 (4):321-330.
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  4. Robert Audi (1977). The Rational Assessment of Emotions. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (2):115-119.
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  5. C. Badcock (2004). Emotion Verses Reason as a Genetic Conflict. In D. Evans & Pierre Cruse (eds.), Emotion, Evolution, and Rationality. Oxford University Press.
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  6. Carla Bagnoli (ed.) (2011). Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
    What is their relation to practical rationality? Are they roots of our identity or threats to our autonomy? This volume is born out of the conviction that philosophy provides a distinctive approach to these problems.
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  7. Harold W. Baillie (1988). Learning the Emotions. New Scholasticism 62 (2):221-227.
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  8. Richard Barrett (1994). On Emotion as a Lapse From Rationality. Journal of Moral Education 23 (2):135-143.
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  9. Volkert Beekman (2006). Feeling Food: The Rationality of Perception. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (3):301-312.
    Regulatory bodies tend to treat people’s emotional responses towards foods as a nuisance for rational opinion-formation and decision-making. This position is thought to be supported by such evidence as: (1) people showing negative emotional responses to the idea of eating meat products from vaccinated livestock; and (2) people showing positive emotional responses to Magnum’s “7 sins” marketing campaign. Such cases are thought to support the idea that regulatory communication about foods should abstract from people’s emotional perceptions and that corporate marketing (...)
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  10. Elizabeth Belfiore (1986). Wine and Catharsis of the Emotions in Plato's Laws. Classical Quarterly 36 (02):421-.
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  11. A. Ben-ze'ev (2003). The Logic of Emotions. In A. Hatimoysis (ed.), Philosophy and the Emotions. Cambridge University Press. 147-162.
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  12. Monika Betzler (2007). Making Sense of Actions Expressing Emotions. Dialectica 61 (3):447–466.
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  13. John Birtchnell (2003). The Two of Me: The Rational Outer Me and the Emotional Inner Me. Routledge.
    This book attempts to answer the question: How much of what we do is the result of conscious and deliberate decisions and how much originates in unconscious, unthought out, automatic directives? The answer is that far more than what we might imagine falls into the second category. We tend to assume responsibility for our unconsciously determined thoughts and actions, and even though we do not know why we think and act the way we do, we make up reasons for it, (...)
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  14. C. Bobonich (2001). Reason and Emotion: Essays on Ancient Moral Psychology. Philosophical Review 110 (2):263-267.
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  15. Nicolao Bonini, Rob Ranyard & Luigi Mittone (2009). Special Issue on “Cognition and Emotion in Economic Decision Making”. Mind and Society 8 (1):1-6.
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  16. Michael S. Brady (2011). Emotions, Perceptions, and Reasons. In Carla Bagnoli (ed.), Morality and the Emotions. Oxford University Press.
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  17. Michael S. Brady (2009). The Irrationality of Recalcitrant Emotions. Philosophical Studies 145 (3):413 - 430.
    A recalcitrant emotion is one which conflicts with evaluative judgement. (A standard example is where someone is afraid of flying despite believing that it poses little or no danger.) The phenomenon of emotional recalcitrance raises an important problem for theories of emotion, namely to explain the sense in which recalcitrant emotions involve rational conflict. In this paper I argue that existing ‘neojudgementalist’ accounts of emotions fail to provide plausible explanations of the irrationality of recalcitrant emotions, and develop and defend my (...)
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  18. Michael S. Brady (2008). Value and Fitting Emotions. Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (4):465-475.
  19. Tad Brennan (2005). The Stoic Life: Emotions, Duties, and Fate. Oxford University Press.
    Tad Brennan explains how to live the Stoic life--and why we might want to. Stoicism has been one of the main currents of thought in Western civilization for two thousand years: Brennan offers a fascinating guide through the ethical ideas of the original Stoic philosophers, and shows how valuable these ideas remain today, both intellectually and in practice. He writes in a lively informal style which will bring Stoicism to life for readers who are new to ancient philosophy. The Stoic (...)
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  20. Eve Browning (2000). Reason and Emotion: Essays in Ancient Moral Psychology and Ethical Theory (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 38 (3):430-432.
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  21. Mikel Burley (2011). Emotion and Anecdote in Philosophical Argument: The Case of Havi Carel's Illness. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):33-48.
    Abstract: Critics of Havi Carel's 2008 book, Illness: The Cry of the Flesh, have contended that Carel's deployment of phenomenological philosophy adds little to commonsense views about illness and that Carel relies too heavily on emotion-laden autobiographical anecdotes. Against these contentions this article argues: first, that a perfectly respectable task of philosophy is to find reasons to support pre-existing beliefs; and secondly, that Carel's use of anecdotes, while certainly appealing to readers' emotions, constitutes part of a legitimate argumentative strategy. The (...)
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  22. Dorion Cairns (2000). Reason and Emotion. Husserl Studies 17 (1):21-33.
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  23. Cheshire Calhoun (ed.) (2004). Setting the Moral Compass: Essays by Women Philosophers. Oxford University Press.
    Setting the Moral Compass brings together the (largely unpublished) work of nineteen women moral philosophers whose powerful and innovative work has contributed to the "re-setting of the compass" of moral philosophy over the past two decades. The contributors, who include many of the top names in this field, tackle several wide-ranging projects: they develop an ethics for ordinary life and vulnerable persons; they examine the question of what we ought to do for each other; they highlight the moral significance of (...)
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  24. Cristiano Castelfranchi, Francesca Giardini & Francesca Marzo (2006). Symposium on ''Cognition and Rationality: Part I'' Relationships Between Rational Decisions, Human Motives, and Emotions. [REVIEW] Mind and Society 5 (2):173-197.
    In the decision-making and rationality research field, rational decision theory (RDT) has always been the main framework, thanks to the elegance and complexity of its mathematical tools. Unfortunately, the formal refinement of the theory is not accompanied by a satisfying predictive accuracy, thus there is a big gap between what is predicted by the theory and the behaviour of real subjects. Here we propose a new foundation of the RDT, which has to be based on a cognitive architecture for reason-based (...)
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  25. A. Charuvastra & S. R. Marder (2008). Unconscious Emotional Reasoning and the Therapeutic Misconception. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (3):193-197.
  26. Wayne Christensen & John Sutton (2012). Reflections on Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning Toward an Integrated, Multidisciplinary Approach to Moral Cognition. In Robyn Langdon & Catriona Mackenzie (eds.), Emotions, Imagination, and Moral Reasoning. Psychology Press. 327-347.
    B eginning with the problem of integrating diverse disciplinary perspectives on moral cognition, we argue that the various disciplines have an interest in developing a common conceptual framework for moral cognition research. We discuss issues arising in the other chapters in this volume that might serve as focal points for future investigation and as the basis for the eventual development of such a framework. These include the role of theory in binding together diverse phenomena and the role of philosophy in (...)
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  27. Justin D'arms (2004). Bennett Helm, Emotional Reason: Deliberation, Motivation, and the Nature of Value (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2001), Pp. X + 261. Utilitas 16 (3):343-345.
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  28. Ellis Van Dam & Jan Steutel (1996). On Emotion and Rationality: A Response to Barrett. Journal of Moral Education 25 (4):395-400.
    Abstract In a recent paper Richard Barrett criticises Solomon (and the so?called cognitivists in general) for dismissing irrational emotions as marginal and atypical. This paper argues that Barrett's criticism is unwarranted. Two explanations are suggested for his misconception of Solomon's view (and, more generally, of the cognitive view) on irrational emotions. First, Barrett mistakenly conceives the reconciliation of emotion and reason as a conciliation of emotion and rationality in an evaluative or normative sense. Secondly, Barrett disregards the difference between the (...)
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  29. Ronald de Sousa, Emotion. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  30. Ronald de Sousa (1997). Toward a Rationality of Emotions: An Essay in the Philosophy of Mind George Turski Athens, OH: Ohio University Press, 1994, Xv + 182, $39.95. [REVIEW] Dialogue 36 (03):666-.
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  31. Ronald B. de Sousa (1979). The Rationality of Emotions. Dialogue.
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  32. Craig DeLancey (2009). Review of Georg Brun, Ulvi Doguoglu, Dominique Kuenzle (Eds.), Epistemology and Emotions. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (3).
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  33. Daniel C. Dennett, Review of Damasio, Descartes' Error. [REVIEW]
    The legacy of René Descartes' notorious dualism of mind and body extends far beyond academia into everyday thinking: "These athletes are prepared both mentally and physically," and "There's nothing wrong with your body--it's all in your mind." Even among those of us who have battled Descartes' vision, there has been a powerful tendency to treat the mind (that is to say, the brain) as the body's boss, the pilot of the ship. Falling in with this standard way of thinking, we (...)
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  34. Andreas Dorschel (1999). Emotion und Verstand. Philosophisches Jahrbuch 106 (1):18-40.
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  35. Jamie Dow (2009). Feeling Fantastic? - Emotions and Appearances in Aristotle. Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 37:143-175.
  36. Jamie Dow (2007). A Supposed Contradiction About Emotion-Arousal in Aristotle's "Rhetoric". Phronesis 52 (4):382 - 402.
    Aristotle, in the Rhetoric, appears to claim both that emotion-arousal has no place in the essential core of rhetorical expertise and that it has an extremely important place as one of three technical kinds of proof. This paper offers an account of how this apparent contradiction can be resolved. The resolution stems from a new understanding of what Rhetoric I. I refers to - not emotions, but set-piece rhetorical devices aimed at manipulating emotions, which do not depend on the facts (...)
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  37. C. Z. Elgin (2008). Emotion and Understanding. In G. Brun, U. Dogluoglu & D. Kuenzle (eds.), Epistemology and Emotions.
  38. Jon Elster (1996). Rationality and the Emotions. Economic Journal 106:1386-97.
    In an earlier paper (Elster, 1989 a), I discussed the relation between rationality and social norms. Although I did mention the role of the emotions in sustaining social norms, I did not focus explicitly on the relation between rationality and the emotions. That relation is the main topic of the present paper, with social norms in a subsidiary part.
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  39. Jon Elster (1994). Rationality, Emotions, and Social Norms. Synthese 98 (1):21 - 49.
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  40. Eva-Maria Engelen (2007). Gefühle. Reclam.
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  41. D. Evans (2002). The Search Hypothesis of Emotions. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):497-509.
    Many philosophers and psychologists now argue that emotions play a vital role in reasoning. This paper explores one particular way of elucidating how emotions help reason which may be dubbed ?the search hypothesis of emotion?. After outlining the search hypothesis of emotion and dispensing with a red herring that has marred previous statements of the hypothesis, I discuss two alternative readings of the search hypothesis. It is argued that the search hypothesis must be construed as an account of what emotions (...)
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  42. D. Evans & Pierre Cruse (eds.) (2004). Emotion, Evolution, and Rationality. Oxford University Press.
    For thousands of years, many Western thinkers have assumed that emotions are, at best, harmless luxuries, and at worst outright obstacles to intelligent action. In the past decade, however, scientists and philosophers have begun to challenge this 'negative view of emotion'. Neuroscientists, psychologists and researchers in artificial intelligence now agree that emotions are vital to intelligent action. Evolutionary considerations have played a vital role in this shift to a more positive view of emotion. -/- This book brings together some of (...)
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  43. Daniel Farell (2004). Rationality and the Emotions. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 4 (11):241-251.
    There are some seemingly clear cases of the use of the concepts of rationality and irrationality in talk about the emotions. Even in such contexts, it is argued here, while not entirely wrong-headed, the use is much less clearly appropriate, upon reflection, than many of us seem to believe. The paper starts with a conception of the emotions which emphasizes the way we construe the world (or some aspect of the world) while we experience them and because of what it (...)
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  44. Luc Faucher & Christine Tappolet (eds.) (2008). The Modularity of Emotions. University of Calgary Press.
    Can emotions be rational or are they necessarily irrational? Are emotions universally shared states? Or are they socio-cultural constructions? Are emotions perceptions of some kind? Since the publication of Jerry Fodor’s The Modularity of Mind (1983), a new question about the philosophy of emotions has emerged: are emotions modular? A positive answer to this question would mean, minimally, that emotions are cognitive capacities that can be explained in terms of mental components that are functionally dissociable from other parts of the (...)
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