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  1. Gosseries Axel, Marciano A. & Strowel A. (eds.) (2008). Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Basingstoke & N.Y.: Palgrave McMillan.
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  2. Gosseries Axel & Meyers L. (eds.) (2009). Intergenerational Justice. Oxford University Press.
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  3. Gosseries Axel & Hungerbühler M. (2006). Rule Change and Intergenerational Justice. In Tremmel J. (ed.), The Handbook of Intergenerational Justice. Edward Elgar.
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  4. Thom Brooks (2012). Preserving Capabilities. American Journal of Bioethics 12 (6):48-49.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 12, Issue 6, Page 48-49, June 2012.
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  5. Pablo Gilabert (2012). Comparative Assessments of Justice, Political Feasibility, and Ideal Theory. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (1):39-56.
    What should our theorizing about social justice aim at? Many political philosophers think that a crucial goal is to identify a perfectly just society. Amartya Sen disagrees. In The Idea of Justice, he argues that the proper goal of an inquiry about justice is to undertake comparative assessments of feasible social scenarios in order to identify reforms that involve justice-enhancement, or injustice-reduction, even if the results fall short of perfect justice. Sen calls this the “comparative approach” to the theory of (...)
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  6. Pablo Gilabert & Holly Lawford-Smith (2012). Political Feasibility. A Conceptual Exploration. Political Studies 60 (4):809-825.
  7. Axel Gosseries (2009). Three Models of Intergenerational Justice and Its Challenges. In Gosseries Axel & Meyer Lukas (eds.), Intergenerational Justice. Oxford University Press.
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  8. Axel Gosseries (ed.) (2008). Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Basingstoke & N.Y.: Palgrave McMillan.
    In this volume, fourteen philosophers, economists and legal scholars and one computer scientist address various facets of the same question: under which conditions (if any) can intellectual property rights be fair? This general question unfolds in a variety of others: What are the parallels and differences between intellectual and real property? Are libertarian theories especially sympathetic to IP rights? Should Rawlsian support copyright? How can a concern for incentives be taken into account by each of the main theories of justice? (...)
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  9. Axel Gosseries (2008). Theories of Intergenerational Justice: A Synopsis. Surv. Perspect. Integr. Environ. Soc 1:39-49.
    In this paper, the author offers a synoptic view of different theories of intergenerational justice, along two dimensions (savings/dissavings) and three modalities (prohibition, authorisation, obligation). After presenting successively the indirect reciprocity, the mutual advantage, the utilitarian and the Lockean approaches, special attention is given to the egalitarian theory of intergenerational justice. Two key differences between the egalitarian view on intergenerational justice and the sufficientarian interpretation of sustainability are highlighted.
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  10. Axel Gosseries (2008). How (Un)Fair is Intellectual Property? In Gosseries Axel, Marciano A. & Strowel A. (eds.), Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Basingstoke & N.Y.: Palgrave McMillan.
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  11. Axel Gosseries (2008). Constitutions and Future Generations. The Good Society 17 (2):32-37.
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  12. Axel Gosseries (2008). Radiological Protection and Intergenerational Justice. In G. Eggermont & B. Feltz (eds.), Ethics and Radiological Protection. Academia-Bruylant.
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  13. Axel Gosseries (2003). Intergenerational Justice. In LaFollette H. (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Practical Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Is it fair to leave the next generation a public debt? Is it defensible to impose legal rules on them through constitutional constraints? From combating climate change to ensuring proper funding for future pensions, concerns about ethics between generations are everywhere. In this volume sixteen philosophers explore intergenerational justice. Part One examines the ways in which various theories of justice look at the matter. These include libertarian, Rawlsian, sufficientarian, contractarian, communitarian, Marxian and reciprocity-based approaches. In Part Two, the authors look (...)
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  14. Axel Gosseries (2001). What Do We Owe the Next Generation(S)? Loyola of Los Angeles Law Review 35 (1):293-354.
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  15. Axel Gosseries & Frédéric Gaspart (2007). Are Generational Savings Unjust? Politics, Philosophy and Economics 6 (2):193-217.
    In this article, we explore the implications of a Rawlsian theory for intergenerational issues. First, we confront Rawls's way of locating his `just savings' principle in his Theory of Justice with an alternative way of doing so. We argue that both sides of his intergenerational principle, as they apply to the accumulation phase and the steady-state stage, can be dealt with on the bases, respectively, of the principle of equal liberty (and its priority) and of the difference principle. We then (...)
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  16. Axel Gosseries, Alain Marciano & Alain Strowel (eds.) (2008). Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Basingstoke & N.Y.: Palgrave McMillan.
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  17. Axel Gosseries & Lukas Meyer (eds.) (2009). Intergenerational Justice. Oxford University Press.
    Is it fair to leave the next generation a public debt? Is it defensible to impose legal rules on them through constitutional constraints? From combating climate change to ensuring proper funding for future pensions, concerns about ethics between generations are everywhere. In this volume sixteen philosophers explore intergenerational justice. Part One examines the ways in which various theories of justice look at the matter. These include libertarian, Rawlsian, sufficientarian, contractarian, communitarian, Marxian and reciprocity-based approaches. In Part Two, the authors look (...)
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  18. Pauline Kleingeld (1998). Just Love? Marriage and the Question of Justice. Social Theory and Practice 24 (2):261-281.
    I argue that promoting justice within marriage requires a cultural reconceptualiza¬tion of marriage itself as not merely a relationship of love, but as also a commitment to justice. I argue that it is insufficient to combat injustice in marriage with progressive laws and policies, even when combined with smart planning and bargaining on the part of women. Also necessary is a change in the way marriage itself is viewed. In addition to being regarded as an emotional commitment, it should also (...)
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  19. Annabelle Lever (2013). A Democratic Conception of Privacy. Authorhouse, UK.
    Carol Pateman has said that the public/private distinction is what feminism is all about. I tend to be sceptical about categorical pronouncements of this sort, but this book is a work of feminist political philosophy and the public/private distinction is what it is all about. It is motivated by the belief that we lack a philosophical conception of privacy suitable for a democracy; that feminism has exposed this lack; and that by combining feminist analysis with recent developments in political philosophy, (...)
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  20. Annabelle Lever (2012). On Privacy. Routledge.
    Privacy is a Janus-faced value. It enables us to shut the world out, but the forms it takes and the extent to which it is protected are fundamentally public matters. Not surprisingly, then, privacy and its protection are the object of some of our most intractable conflicts over the proper role of the state and the rights and duties of individuals. -/- This book explores the Janus-faced features of privacy, and looks at their implications for the control of personal information, (...)
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  21. Annabelle Lever (2012). New Frontiers in the Philosophy of Intellectual Property. Cambridge University Press.
    The new frontiers in the philosophy of intellectual property lie squarely in territories belonging to moral and political philosophy, as well as legal philosophy and philosophy of economics – or so this collection suggests. Those who wish to understand the nature and justification of intellectual property may now find themselves immersed in philosophical debates on the structure and relative merits of consequentialist and deontological moral theories, or disputes about the nature and value of privacy, or the relationship between national and (...)
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  22. Annabelle Lever (2008). Is It Ethical To Patent Human Genes? In Gosseries Axel, Marciano A. & Strowel A. (eds.), Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Basingstoke & N.Y.: Palgrave Mcmillan. 246--64.
    This paper examines the claims that moral objections to the patenting of human genes are misplaced and rest on confusions about what a patent is, or what is patented by a human gene patent. It shows that theese objections rest on too simple a conception of property rights, and the connections betwteen familiar moral objections to private property and moral objections to the patenting of human genes. Above all, the paper claims, objections to HGPs often reflect worries about the lack (...)
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  23. Annabelle Lever (2007). Mill and the Secret Ballot: Beyond Coercion and Corruption. Utilitas 19 (3):354-378.
    In Considerations on Representative Government, John Stuart Mill concedes that secrecy in voting is often justified but, nonetheless, maintains that it should be the exception rather than the rule. This paper critically examines Mill’s arguments. It shows that Mill’s idea of voting depends on a sharp public/private distinction which is difficult to square with democratic ideas about the different powers and responsibilities of voters and their representatives, or with legitimate differences of belief and interest amongst voters themselves. Hence, it concludes, (...)
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  24. Annabelle Lever (2005). Beate Rossler, Ed., Privacies: Philosophical Evaluations Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 25 (1):67-69.
  25. Annabelle Lever (2004). Anita L. Allen, Why Privacy Isn't Everything: Feminist Reflections on Personal Accountability Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (1):1-3.
  26. H. P. P. Lotter (2011). Poverty, Ethics and Justice. University of Wales Press.
    Poverty is one of the most serious moral issues of our time that does not yet get the appropriate response it deserves. This book first gives an in depth moral analysis and evaluation of the complex manifestations of poverty. It then offers a series of ethical reasons to motivate everyone to engage in the struggle to eradicate poverty. -/- Social science research results are synthesized into a definition and explanation of poverty that provide proper background for moral evaluation. Poverty is (...)
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  27. H. P. P. Lotter (2010). Refashioning Rawls as a True Champion of the Poor. Politikon 37 (1):149-171.
    Rawls champions the cause of the poor because of his strong moral sentiments about the eradication of poverty. I present these sentiments, which he converts into normative elements of his theory of justice. However, the conceptual framework and intellectual resources that he uses to articulate these sentiments are inadequate. His sentiments against poverty cannot be accommodated neatly, simply, and coherently in his liberal theoretical framework. Also, I point out that his definition of the identification of poor people as the least (...)
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  28. H. P. P. Lotter (2005). Compensating for Impoverishing Injustices of the Distant Past. Politikon 32 (1):83-102.
    Calls for compensation are heard in many countries all over the world. Spokespersons on behalf of formerly oppressed and dominated groups call for compensation for the deeply traumatic injustices their members have suffered in the past. Sometimes these injustices were suffered decades ago by members already deceased. How valid are such claims to compensation and should they be honoured as a matter of justice? The focus of this essay is on these issues of compensatory justice. I want to look at (...)
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  29. John O'Neill & Martin O'Neill (2012). Social Justice and the Future of Flood Insurance. Joseph Rowntree Foundation.
    What would be a fair model for flood insurance? Catastrophic flooding has become increasingly frequent in the UK and, with climate change, is likely to become even more frequent in the future. With the UK's current flood insurance regime ending in 2013, we argues that: -/- - there is an overwhelming case for rejecting a free market in flood insurance after 2013; - this market-based approach threatens to leave many thousands of properties uninsurable, leading to extensive social blight; - there (...)
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  30. Martin O'Neill (2008). Three Rawlsian Routes Towards Economic Democracy. Revue de Philosophie Économique 9 (1):29-55.
    This paper addresses ways of arguing fors ome form of economic democracy from within a broadly Rawlsian framework. Firstly, one can argue that a right to participate in economic decision-making should be added to the Rawlsian list of basic liberties, protected by the first principle of justice. Secondly,I argue that a society which institutes forms of economic democracy will be more likely to preserve a stable and just basic structure over time, by virtue of the effects of economic democratization on (...)
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  31. Jeppe von Platz (2012). Negative Perfectionism. Philosophy and Public Issues 2 (1):101-122.
    In this essay I defend a variety of political perfectionism that I call negative perfectionism. Negative perfectionism is the position that if some design of the basic structure of society promotes objectively bad human living, then this should count as a reason against it. To give this hypothetical some bite, I draw on Rousseau’s diagnosis of the maladies of his society to defend two further claims: first, that some human lives are objectively bad, and, second, that some designs of the (...)
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  32. Thomas Porter (2009). The Division of Moral Labour and the Basic Structure Restriction. Politics, Philosophy and Economics 8 (2):173-199.
    Justice makes demands upon us. But these demands, important though they may be, are not the only moral demands that we face. Our lives ought to be responsive to other values too. However, some philosophers have identified an apparent tension between those values and norms, such as justice, that seem to transcend the arena of small-scale interpersonal relations and those that are most at home in precisely that arena. How, then, are we to engage with all of the values and (...)
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  33. Paul Prescott (2014). Unthinkable ≠ Unknowable: On Charlotte Delbo's 'II Faut Donner à Voir'. Journal of Value Inquiry 48 (3):457-468.
    This is my sister here, with some unidentifiable friend and many other people. They are all listening to me and it is this very story [the story of Auschwitz] that I am telling … [I] speak diffusely of our hunger and of the lice-control, and of the Kapo who hit me on the nose and then sent me to wash myself as I was bleeding. It is an intense pleasure, physical, inexpressible, to be at home, among friendly people and to (...)
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  34. Desh Raj Sirswal (2012). Casteism, Social Security and Violation of Human Rights. In Manoj Kumar (ed.), Human Rights for All.
    The consciousness of social security comes to a man when he feels that he is getting his basic rights. Human Rights are related to those rights which are related to man’s life, freedom, equality and self-esteem, are established by Indian constitution or universal declaration of human rights and implemented by Indian judiciary system. In other words, “Human rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, color, religion, language, or any (...)
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  35. Justin Weinberg (2009). Norms and the Agency of Justice. Analyse & Kritik 31 (2):319-338.
    In this paper I argue that when thinking about justice, political philosophers should pay more attention to social norms, not just the usual subjects of basic principles, rights, laws, and policies. I identify two widely-endorsed ideas about political philosophy that interfere with recognizing the importance of social norms—ideas I dub ‘compulsoriness’ and ‘institutionalism’—and argue for their rejection. I do this largely by focusing on questions about who can and should be an agent of justice. I argue that careful reflection on (...)
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