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Aspects of Perception

Edited by Benj Hellie (University of Toronto, University of Toronto at Scarborough)
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  1. Peter Achinstein (1975). Causation, Transparency, and Emphasis. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):1 - 23.
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  2. G. Allen (2006). Transparency and Teaching. Theory, Culture and Society 23 (2-3):568-570.
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  3. Ilyas Altuner (2011). Transition From Doubt to Knowledge and Comprehension of the Mind Itself in Descartes’ Philosophy. Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):94-109.
    Descartes uses skepticism as a method in the search for truth and afterwards he arrives at the knowledge of truth by conception cogito, which is an intuitive proposition. Comprehension of the mind itself is asserted from which ego cannot be cut from thinking, and this conception is based on the existence of God who does exist to be contained in the mind conceptually. God is stated the most perfect being which does rescue mind from doubt and show its real being (...)
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  4. Ilyas Altuner (2011). Transition From Doubt to Knowledge and Comprehension of the Mind Itself in Descartes’ Philosophy. Beytulhikme An International Journal of Philosophy 1 (1):94-109.
    Descartes uses skepticism as a method in the search for truth and afterwards he arrives at the knowledge of truth by conception cogito, which is an intuitive proposition. Comprehension of the mind itself is asserted from which ego cannot be cut from thinking, and this conception is based on the existence of God who does exist to be contained in the mind conceptually. God is stated the most perfect being which does rescue mind from doubt and show its real being (...)
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  5. Zenon Bankowski (1999). Transparency and the Particular. Cultural Values 3 (4):427-444.
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  6. J. Beck & R. Ivry (1986). The Perception of Transparency and X-Junctions. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 24 (5):328-329.
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  7. Barry Bell (2004). Bangkok: Angelic Illusions. Reaktion Books.
    "Using direct observations of the surrounding landscape and the tangibel artifacts of the city, its topography, streets, temples and other stunning architectural monuments, Barry Bell carries out a progressive investigation into Bangkok's ...
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  8. Audre Jean Brokes (2000). The Argument From Illusion Reconsidered. Disputatio 9 (1):1-7.
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  9. Rogene A. Buchholz (2000). 3. The Normative-Empirical Split: Reality or Illusion? The Ruffin Series in Business Ethics:35-49.
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  10. John Chapman (1995). Transparency? What Transparency? Business Ethics 4 (3):139–142.
  11. Anne M. Cronin (1999). Seeing Through Transparency: Performativity, Vision and Intent1. Cultural Values 3 (1):54-72.
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  12. Jeff Engelhardt (2009). Visual Transparency. Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 28 (1):5-20.
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  13. Leif Engström & Per-Eric Häll (2005). User Controlled Transparency Model. In Alan F. Blackwell & David MacKay (eds.), Power. Cambridge University Press. 17.
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  14. Christina Garsten & Monica Lindh de Montoya (2009). Transparency Tricks. In Christina Garsten & Tor Hernes (eds.), Ethical Dilemmas in Management. Routledge.
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  15. Herbert Heidelberger & G. Lynn Stephens (1978). Transparency and Modality. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (4):549.
  16. Christopher Hood & David Heald (unknown). Transparency: The Key to Better Governance? Proceedings of the British Academy 135.
    Christopher Hood: Transparency in Historical Perspective David Heald: Varieties of Transparency Patrick Birkinshaw: Transparency as a Human Right David Heald: Transparency as an Instrumental Value Onora O'Neill: Transparency and the Ethics of Communication Andrea Prat: The More Closely We Are Watched, the Better We Behave? Alasdair Roberts: Dashed Expectations: Governmental Adaptation to Transparency Rules Andrew McDonald: What Hope Freedom of Information in th UK James Savage: Member State Bedgetary Transparency in the Economic and Monetary Union David Stasavage: Does Transparency Make (...)
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  17. Ronald W. Langacker (1999). And Transparency. In Andreas Blank & Peter Koch (eds.), Historical Semantics and Cognition. Mouton de Gruyter. 13--147.
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  18. Fiona Macpherson & Dimitris Platchias (eds.) (2013). Hallucination. MIT Press.
    Scientific and philosophical perspectives on hallucination: essays that draw on empirical evidence from psychology, neuroscience, and cutting-edge philosophical theory.
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  19. Filip Mattens (2013). Strange Objects, Counterfeits and Reproduction: Clues for Analyzing Perceptual Experience in the Different Senses. Logical Analysis and History of Philosophy 16.
  20. Thomas Metzinger (2006). Reply to Livet: Meta-Abeyance? Psyche 12.
    Let me begin by pointing out a number of potential misunderstandings in Pierre Livet’s densely written commentary. In the first paragraph, Pierre Livet writes, “phenomenal transparency involves an implication of the existence of the entities represented” . This is what I call the “extensionality equivocation” . As explained at length in BNO, “phenomenal transparency” has been a technical term in philosophy at least since G. E. Moore’s paper The Refutation of Idealism. In BNO, I offered a refined notion of the (...)
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  21. Carlos Mario Muñoz-Suárez (2011). The Transparency of Experience Argument. In Michael Bruce & Steven Barbone (eds.), Just the Arguments: 100 of the Most Important Arguments in Western Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  22. Yasushi Ogusa (2011). What Does the 'Transparency of Experience' Show About the Relationship Between the Phenomenality and the Intentionality of Experience? Kagaku Tetsugaku 44 (1):17-33.
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  23. Kim Sang Ong-Van-Cung (2004). L'« argument de l'illusion » et la philosophie cartésienne des idées. Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 2 (2):217-233.
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  24. Jérome Pelletier (2007). On the 'Hyperinsulation' and 'Transparency' of Imaginery Situations. In María José Frápolli (ed.), Saying, Meaning and Referring: Essays on François Recanati's Philosophy of Language. Palgrave Macmillan.
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  25. J. W. P. Phillips (2011). Secrecy and Transparency: An Interview with Samuel Weber. Theory, Culture and Society 28 (7-8):158-172.
    In this interview Samuel Weber proposes a rethinking of the relation of secrecy to transparency and outlines some of the forms it takes, while considering certain of its implications for current social, political and epistemological contexts. He begins by questioning the opposition itself, suggesting that we will have to learn to be more at home with the secret and that the demand for transparency must be radically rethought and complicated. He argues that the demand for absolute transparency can only promote (...)
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  26. Stephen H. Phillips (1987). Padmapāda's Illusion Argument. Philosophy East and West 37 (1):3-23.
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  27. Mathew K. V. Punchayil (1992). "Transparency" of Nature in Selected Literary Texts. Dissertation, St. John's University (New York)
    Among the varied attitudes and responses to Nature, a consistent stream of responses centered round Nature's "transparency," over the centuries and across the continents, is discernible, as it finds expression in the literatures of the world. Based on this basic presupposition, this study of The Bhagavad Gita, Nature , and Hopkins' poetry aims at the discovery, in spite of their many differences, of their common vision of Nature's "transparency." ;"Transparency" of Nature, at its highest level, is not susceptible to the (...)
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  28. Steven L. Reynolds (2000). The Argument From Illusion. Noûs 34 (4):604-621.
    In an attempt to revive discussion of the argument from illusion this paper amends the classic version of the argument to avoid Austin's main objection. It then develops and defends a version of the intentional object reply to the argument, arguing that an "unendorsed story" account of reports of dreams and hallucinations avoids commitment to nonexistent objects.
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  29. Renée Smith (2011). The Broad Perception Model and the Transparency of Qualia. Behavior and Philosophy 39:69-81.
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  30. K. Srinivas (2003). The Argument From Illusion. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 30 (2):237-250.
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  31. Paul Sturges (2007). What is This Absence Called Transparency. International Review of Information Ethics 7 (7):1-8.
    Campaigners against corruption advocate transparency as a fundamental condition for its prevention. Trans-parency in itself is not the most important thing: it is the accountability that it makes possible. Transparency itself is, in fact, a metaphor based on the ability of light to pass through a solid, but transparent, medium and reveal what is on the other side. In practice it allows the revelation of what otherwise might have been concealed, and it is applied in a social context to the (...)
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  32. Edward Zlotkowski (1997). Presence and Transparency. Renascence 50 (1-2):135-151.
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Illusion and Hallucination
  1. Joseph Anderson & Barbara Anderson (1993). The Myth of Persistence of Vision Revisited. Journal of Film and Video 45:3--12.
  2. Louise Antony (2011). The Openness of Illusions. Philosophical Issues 21 (1):25-44.
    Illusions are thought to make trouble for the intuition that perceptual experience is "open" to the world. Some have suggested, in response to the this trouble, that illusions differ from veridical experience in the degree to which their character is determined by their engagement with the world. An understanding of the psychology of perception reveals that this is not the case: veridical and falsidical perceptions engage the world in the same way and to the same extent. While some contemporary vision (...)
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  3. István Aranyosi (forthcoming). Silencing the Argument From Hallucination. In Fiona MacPherson & Dimitris Platchias (eds.), Hallucination (MIT Press).
    Ordinary people tend to be realists regarding perceptual experience, that is, they take perceiving the environment as a direct, unmediated, straightforward access to a mindindependent reality. Not so for (ordinary) philosophers. The empiricist influence on the philosophy of perception, in analytic philosophy at least, made the problem of perception synonymous with the view that realism is untenable. Admitting the problem (and trying to offer a view on it) is tantamount to rejecting ordinary people’s implicit realist assumptions as naive. So what (...)
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  4. David M. Armstrong (1955). Illusions of Sense. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 33 (August):88-106.
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  5. Keith Augustine (2015). Near-Death Experiences Are Hallucinations. In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. 529-569.
    Reports of near-death experiences (NDEs) with suggestive or manifestly hallucinatory features strongly imply that NDEs are not glimpses of an afterlife, but rather internally generated fantasies. Such features include discrepancies between what is seen in the seemingly physical environment of “out-of-body” NDEs and what is actually happening in the physical world at the time, bodily sensations felt after near-death experiencers (NDErs) have ostensibly departed the physical world altogether and entered a transcendental realm, encounters with living persons and fictional characters while (...)
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  6. Jean Pierre Bâeland (2003). La Crise de l'Art Contemporain Illusion Ou R'ealit'e? Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  7. Clare Batty (2010). What the Nose Doesn't Know: Non-Veridicality and Olfactory Experience. Journal of Consciousness Studies 17 (3-4):10-17.
    We can learn much about perceptual experience by thinking about how it can mislead us. In this paper, I explore whether, and how, olfactory experience can mislead. I argue that, in the case of olfactory experience, the traditional distinction between illusion and hallucination does not apply. Integral to the traditional distinction is a notion of ‘object-failure’—the failure of an experience to present objects accurately. I argue that there are no such presented objects in olfactory experience. As a result, olfactory experience (...)
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  8. Aaron Ben-Zeev (1984). What is a Perceptual Mistake? Journal of Mind and Behavior 5 (3):261-278.
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  9. Alfred Binet (1884). Visual Hallucinations in Hypnotism. Mind 9 (35):413-415.
  10. Max Black (1971/1963). Philosophical Analysis. Freeport, N.Y.,Books for Libraries Press.
    Introduction MAX BLACK Nothing of any value can be said on method except through examples; but now, at the end of our course, we may collect certain general ...
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  11. S. V. Bokil (2005). The Argument From Illusion: All Appearance and No Reality. Indian Philosophical Quarterly 32 (1-2):147-158.
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  12. Philip Bretzel (1974). Cornman, Sensa, and the Argument From Hallucination. Philosophical Studies 26 (5-6):443-445.
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  13. Philip Bretzevonl (1974). Cornman, Sensa, and the Argument From Hallucination. Philosophical Studies 26 (December):443-445.
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  14. Bill Brewer (2008). How to Account for Illusion. In Adrian Haddock & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Disjunctivism: Perception, Action, Knowledge. Oxford University Press. 168-180.
    The question how to account for illusion has had a prominent role in shaping theories of perception throughout the history of philosophy. Prevailing philosophical wisdom today has it that phenomena of illusion force us to choose between the following two options. First, reject altogether the early modern empiricist idea that the core subjective character of perceptual experience is to be given simply by citing the object presented in that experience. Instead we must characterize perceptual experience entirely in terms of its (...)
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  15. Robert Briscoe (2010). Perceiving the Present: Systematization of Illusions or Illusion of Systematization? Cognitive Science 34 (8):1530-1542.
    Mark Changizi et al. (2008) claim that it is possible systematically to organize more than 50 kinds of illusions in a 7 × 4 matrix of 28 classes. This systematization, they further maintain, can be explained by the operation of a single visual processing latency correction mechanism that they call “perceiving the present” (PTP). This brief report raises some concerns about the way a number of illusions are classified by the proposed systematization. It also poses two general problems—one empirical and (...)
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  16. Berit Brogaard (forthcoming). Synesthetic Binding and the Reactivation Model of Memory. In Ophelia Deroy (ed.), Sensory Blendings: New essays on synaesthesia. Oxford University Press.
    Despite the recent surge in research on, and interest in, synesthesia, the mechanism underlying this condition is still unknown. Feedforward mechanisms involving overlapping receptive fields of sensory neurons as well as feedback mechanisms involving a lack of signal disinhibition have been proposed. Here I show that a broad range of studies of developmental synesthesia indicate that the mechanism underlying the phenomenon may involve reinstatement of brain activity in different sensory or cognitive streams in a way that is similar to what (...)
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  17. Berit Brogaard (ed.) (2014). Does Perception Have Content? Oup Usa.
    This volume of new essays brings together philosophers representing many different perspectives to address central questions in the philosophy of perception.
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  18. Jason W. Brown (2004). The Illusory and the Real. Mind and Matter 2 (1):37-59.
    This contribution explores the psychological basis of illusion and the feeling of what is real in relation to a process theory (microgenesis) of mind/brain states. The varieties of illusion and the alterations in the feeling of realness are illustrated in cases of clinical pathology, as well as in everyday life. The basis of illusion does not rest in a comparison of appearance to reality nor in the relation of image to object, since these are antecedent and consequent phases in the (...)
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