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  1. Abraham S. Abraham, Judith Abrams, Steven Abrams, Sura Al-Ahzab, Sura Al-Bakara, Gad Al-Hak, Sura Al-Hegret, Sura Al-Nahl, Sura Al-Omran & Sura Al-Sura (1997). A Gentle Death? A Christian View of Euthanasia, 109-110'A Christian Response to Physician-Assisted Suicide', 279-280. Bioethics Yearbook: Volume 5-Theological Developments in Bioethics: 1992-1994 5:289.
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  2. Sonya Paisley Agnew, Michael M. Minieka, Ronak M. Patel & Daniel J. Nagle (2012). Correlation Between Preoperative Kimura Inching Studies and Intraoperative Findings During Endoscopic-Assisted Decompression of the Ulnar Nerve at the Elbow. In Zdravko Radman (ed.), The Hand. Mit Press. 370-373.
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  3. Raniszewska-Wyrwa Agnieszka (2009). Suicide in the in the View of Christian Ethics and its Social and Legal Consequences (Samobójstwo W Ocenie Etyki Chrzescijanskiej I Jej Spoleczno-Prawne Konsekwencje). Archeus. Studia Z Bioetyki I Antropologii Filozoficznej 10:21-44.
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  4. R. A. Ahmed, P. C. Sorum & E. Mullet (2010). Young Kuwaitis' Views of the Acceptability of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (11):671-676.
    Aim To study the views of people in a largely Muslim country, Kuwait, of the acceptability of a life-ending action such as physician-assisted suicide (PAS). Method 330 Kuwaiti university students judged the acceptability of PAS in 36 scenarios composed of all combinations of four factors: the patient's age (35, 60 or 85 years); the level of incurability of the illness (completely incurable vs extremely difficult to cure); the type of suffering (extreme physical pain or complete dependence) and the extent to (...)
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  5. Shakuntala A. Singh Ajai R. Singh (2004). Towards A Suicide Free Society: Identify Suicide Prevention As Public Health Policy. Mens Sana Monographs 2 (1):21.
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  6. Ann Alpers (1998). Criminal Act or Palliative Care? Prosecutions Involving the Care of the Dying. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 26 (4):308-331.
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  7. E. Joanne Angelo (2001). Depression and Assisted Suicide in the Terminally Ill. The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 1 (3):307-312.
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  8. A. J. V. D. Arend (1998). An Ethical Perspective on Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide in the Netherlands From a Nursing Point of View. Nursing Ethics 5 (4):307-318.
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  9. Elvio Baccarini (2001). Rawls and the Question of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 1 (3):331-345.
    Rawls’s theory of justice is capable of providing an important contribution to the question of physician-assisted suicide (PAS). PAS should be guaranteed as a right to make decisions in accordance with the conception of the good the individual formulates as a rational being. This defense is supported, therefore, by a Kantian premise. But it is also possible to oppose this kind of proposal by relying on differentaspects of Kant’s theory, i.e. on some variant of the famous argument against suicide based (...)
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  10. S. Bailey (1996). Should All Patients Who Attempt Suicide Be Treated? A Response to Savulescu. Monash Bioethics Review 15 (1):42.
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  11. V. Balakrishnan (2009). The Making of a Physician. Mens Sana Monographs 7 (1):184.
    Medicine is a science, and healing, an art. The right mix of a scientist and an artist is essential in a good physician. Clinical detachment is the balance between the scientist and the human. Good physicians are born; however, it is possible to cultivate the qualities. Gaining the patient's confidence is an art; a sense of humor can greatly help. Give a child respect and he becomes your friend. Death is inevitable, but a physician can help make it less agonizing. (...)
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  12. Karen F. Balkin & Robert D. Lane (2005). Assisted Suicide. Greenhaven Press.
    Contributors explore the social, medical, and ethical dilemma of assisted suicide in this revised edition that includes international as well as domestic viewpoints. The federal government's continued challenges to Oregon's Death with Dignity Act, the disabled community's response to assisted suicide, and the slippery slope argument are all examined.
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  13. A. Banerjee & D. Birenbaum-Carmeli (2007). Ordering Suicide: Media Reporting of Family Assisted Suicide in Britain. Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (11):639-642.
    Objective: To explore the relationship between the presentation of suffering and support for euthanasia in the British news media.Method: Data was retrieved by searching the British newspaper database LexisNexis from 1996 to 2000. Twenty-nine articles covering three cases of family assisted suicide were found. Presentations of suffering were analysed employing Heidegger’s distinction between technological ordering and poetic revealing.Findings: With few exceptions, the press constructed the complex terrain of FAS as an orderly or orderable performance. This was enabled by containing the (...)
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  14. R. Barcaro (1998). Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: Disagreements in the Ethical Debate. Verifiche: Rivista Trimestrale di Scienze Umane 27 (3-4).
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  15. Charles H. Baron (2006). Not DEA'd Yet: Gonzalez V. Oregon. Hastings Center Report 36 (2):8.
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  16. William G. Bartholome (1996). Physician-Assisted Suicide, Hospice, and Rituals of Withdrawal. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (3):233-236.
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  17. P. Bartmann (2003). Physician-Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: German Protestantism, Conscience, and the Limits of Purely Ethical Reflection. Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):203-225.
    In this essay I shall describe and analyse the current debate on physician assisted suicide in contemporary German Protestant church and theology. It will be shown that the Protestant Church in Germany together with her Roman Catholic sister church has a specific and influential position in the public discussion: The two churches counting the majority of the population in Germany among their members tend to “organize” a social and political consensus on end-of-life questions. This cooperation is until now very successful: (...)
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  18. M. Pabst Battin (2005). Ending Life: Ethics and the Way We Die. Oxford University Press.
    Margaret Pabst Battin has established a reputation as one of the top philosophers working in bioethics today. This work is a sequel to Battin's 1994 volume The Least Worst Death. The last ten years have seen fast-moving developments in end-of-life issues, from the legalization of physician-assisted suicide in Oregon and the Netherlands to furor over proposed restrictions of scheduled drugs used for causing death, and the development of "NuTech" methods of assistance in dying. Battin's new collection covers a remarkably wide (...)
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  19. Margaret P. Battin (2005). Euthanasia and Physician Assisted Suicide. In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Practical Ethics. Oup Oxford.
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  20. T. L. Beauchamp (1999). The Medical Ethics of Physician-Assisted Suicide. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (6):437-439.
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  21. Hazel Bell (1998). And Another Thing... Words in Your Ear: A Techno-Assisted Revival of an Ancient Art. Logos 9 (4):222-227.
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  22. Christopher Belshaw (2014). Assisted Death: A Study in Ethics and Law. Philosophical Quarterly 64 (254):157-158.
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  23. M. K. Bendiane, A.-D. Bouhnik, A. Galinier, R. Favre, Y. Obadia & P. Peretti-Watel (2009). French Hospital Nurses' Opinion About Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide: A National Phone Survey. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (4):238-244.
    Background: Hospital nurses are frequently the first care givers to receive a patient’s request for euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide (PAS). In France, there is no consensus over which medical practices should be considered euthanasia, and this lack of consensus blurred the debate about euthanasia and PAS legalisation. This study aimed to investigate French hospital nurses’ opinions towards both legalisations, including personal conceptions of euthanasia and working conditions and organisation. Methods: A phone survey conducted among a random national sample of 1502 (...)
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  24. Martin Benjamin (1995). Causation and Responsibility in Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 20 (1):431-441.
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  25. R. Bennett (2000). Drug Use in Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: Edited by Margaret P Battin and Arthur G Lipman, New York, Pharmaceutical Products Press, 1996, 360 Pages, US$36.00. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Ethics 26 (3):222-a-223.
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  26. Philip A. Berry (2013). From Empathy to Assisted Dying: An Argument. Clinical Ethics 8 (1):5-8.
    Assisted dying (AD) has not been legalized despite a number of presentations to parliament. It is necessary for doctors who support AD to justify themselves in the context of repeated legislative failure. This article describes the author's personal approach to the problem, one that prioritizes respect for autonomy above legal or societal objections. It is argued that for debilitated patients, the preservation of autonomy depends on a doctor's empathy and willingness to advocate. This sequence can be interrupted by externally and (...)
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  27. Nigel Biggar (2004). Aiming to Kill: The Ethics of Suicide and Euthanasia. Pilgrim Press.
    1. The traditional position and the pressures for change. The Western legal tradition -- The Christian ethical hinterland -- The exceptional value of human life -- The justification of taking human life -- Suicide -- Christian ethics, assisted suicide, and voluntary euthanasia -- The cultural pressures for change -- 2. The value of human life -- 3. The morality of acts of killing -- 4. Slippery slopes.
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  28. Hazel Biggs (2011). Legitimate Compassion or Compassionate Legitimation? Reflections on the Policy for Prosecutors in Respect of Cases of Encouraging or Assisting Suicide. Feminist Legal Studies 19 (1):83-91.
    This commentary explores the background to, and implications of, the recently published Director of Public Prosecutions guidelines for prosecutors in respect of cases of encouraging or assisting suicide. It considers the extent of the provisions and questions the legitimacy of their focus on the compassionate motivation of the assistant, and the apparent prohibition on healthcare professionals providing such help. It concludes by suggesting that a permissive change in the law would provide better safeguards for those who seek assisted dying.
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  29. Hazel Biggs (2001). Euthanasia, Death with Dignity, and the Law. Hart Publishing.
    Machine generated contents note: Table of Cases xi -- Table of legislation xv -- Introduction: Medicine Men, Outlaws and Voluntary Euthanasia 1 -- 1. To Kill or not to Kill; is that the Euthanasia Question? 9 -- Introduction-Why Euthanasia? 9 -- Dead or alive? 16 -- Euthanasia as Homicide 25 -- Euthanasia as Death with Dignity 29 -- 2. Euthanasia and Clinically assisted Death: from Caring to Killing? 35 -- Introduction 35 -- The Indefinite Continuation of Palliative Treatment 38 -- (...)
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  30. Nikola Biller-Andorno (2010). Physician-Assisted Suicide: Views of Swiss Health Care Professionals. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (3):283-285.
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  31. Brian Bix (2003). Physician-Assisted Suicide and Federalism. Notre Dame Journal of Law, Ethics and Public Policy 17 (1):53-70.
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  32. Julian Bleek (2012). Is Physician-Assisted Suicide Justifiable When the Patient is Worried About Being a Burden to Others? Ethik in der Medizin 24:193-205.
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  33. Theo A. Boer (2007). Recurring Themes in the Debate About Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. [REVIEW] Journal of Religious Ethics 35 (3):527 - 555.
    During the past four decades, the Netherlands played a leading role in the debate about euthanasia and assisted suicide. Despite the claim that other countries would soon follow the Dutch legalization of euthanasia, only Belgium and the American state of Oregon did. In many countries, intense discussions took place. This article discusses some major contributions to the discussion about euthanasia and assisted suicide as written by Nigel Biggar (2004), Arthur J. Dyck (2002), Neil M. Gorsuch (2006), and John Keown (2002). (...)
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  34. Pierre-Yves Bonin (1998). Ronald Dworkin, « Assisted Suicide : What the Court Really Said », The New York Review of Books, 25 Septembre 1997, P. 40-44.Ronald Dworkin, « Assisted Suicide : What the Court Really Said », The New York Review of Books, 25 Septembre 1997, P. 40-44. [REVIEW] Philosophiques 25 (2):306-311.
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  35. J. Donald Boudreau & Margaret Somerville (forthcoming). Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide: A Physician’s and Ethicist’s Perspectives. Medicolegal and Bioethics:1.
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  36. Joseph Boyle (2004). Medical Ethics and Double Effect: The Case of Terminal Sedation. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 25 (1):51-60.
    The use of terminal sedation to control theintense discomfort of dying patients appearsboth to be an established practice inpalliative care and to run counter to the moraland legal norm that forbids health careprofessionals from intentionally killingpatients. This raises the worry that therequirements of established palliative care areincompatible with moral and legal opposition toeuthanasia. This paper explains how thedoctrine of double effect can be relied on todistinguish terminal sedation from euthanasia. The doctrine of double effect is rooted inCatholic moral casuistry, but (...)
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  37. S. S. Braithwaite & N. O. Unferth (1993). Phone Fees: A Justification of Physician Charges. Journal of Clinical Ethics 4 (3):219.
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  38. I. Brassington (2012). The 2012 Report of the Commission on Assisted Dying: Providing Assistance in the Debate That Will Not Die? Clinical Ethics 7 (1):28-32.
    The Commission on Assisted Dying was an unofficial body set up to investigate the legal position on assisted dying in the UK in the autumn of 2010. Its report was published to some degree of media attention in the first week of January 2012; its most headline-grabbing suggestion provided a framework setting out how British law might be reformed to allow assisted dying for the terminally ill. In this paper, I analyse some of the key points of the report and (...)
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  39. Iain Brassington (2008). Five Words for Assisted Dying. Law and Philosophy 27 (5):415 - 444.
    Motivated by Lord Joffe’s Assisted Dying for the Terminally Ill Bill, but with one eye on any possible future legislation, I consider the justifications that might be offered for limiting assistance in dying to those who are suffering unbearably from terminal illness. I argue that the terminal illness criterion and the unbearable suffering criterion are not morally defensible separately: that a person need be neither terminally ill (or ill at all), nor suffering unbearably (or suffering at all) to have a (...)
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  40. Florian Braune & Anna-Karina Jakovljević (2004). Physician-Assisted Suicide—Medical, Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications. Ethik in der Medizin 16 (4):420-423.
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  41. J. F. Bresnahan (1995). Observations on the Rejection of Physician-Assisted Suicide: A Roman Catholic Perspective. Christian Bioethics 1 (3):256-284.
    Roman Catholic moral theology follows a centuries-old tradition of moral reflection. Contemporary Roman Catholic moral theory applies these traditional arguments to the realm of medical ethics, including the issues of active euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide. Unavoidable moral limits on licit medical intervention sometimes require that the moral duty to treat, cede to the duty to cease treatment when measures become more harmful than beneficial to the patient. This does not reduce the need for the compassionate use of palliative care in (...)
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  42. Dan W. Brock (1999). A Critique of Three Objections to Physician‐Assisted Suicide. Ethics 109 (3):519-547.
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  43. Dan W. Brock (1993). Life and Death: Philosophical Essays in Biomedical Ethics. Cambridge University Press.
    How should modern medicine's dramatic new powers to sustain life be employed? How should limited resources be used to extend and improve the quality of life? In this collection, Dan Brock, a distinguished philosopher and bioethicist and co-author of Deciding for Others (Cambridge, 1989), explores the moral issues raised by new ideals of shared decision making between physicians and patients. The book develops an ethical framework for decisions about life-sustaining treatment and euthanasia, and examines how these life and death decisions (...)
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  44. Dan W. Brock (1986). The Value of Prolonging Human Life. Philosophical Studies 50 (3):401 - 428.
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  45. Howard Brody (2001). Assisted Suicide for Those Not Terminally Ill. Hastings Center Report 31 (1):7.
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  46. Bert Broeckaert (2011). Palliative Sedation, Physician-Assisted Suicide, and Euthanasia: “Same, Same but Different”? American Journal of Bioethics 11 (6):62 - 64.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 6, Page 62-64, June 2011.
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  47. Bert Broeckaert, Joris Gielen, Trudie van Iersel & Stef van Den Branden (2009). The Attitude of Flemish Palliative Care Physicians to Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide. Ethical Perspectives 16 (3):311-335.
    Surveys carried out among palliative care physicians have shown that most participants do not support euthanasia and assisted suicide. Belgium, however, is one of the few countries in the world in which voluntary euthanasia is allowed by law. The potential influence of this legal dimension thus warranted a study of the attitudes of Belgian palliative care physicians toward euthanasia and assisted suicide. To this end, an anonymous self-administered questionnaire in Dutch was sent to all physicians working in Flemish palliative care. (...)
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  48. Courtenay R. Bruce (2012). “In Love With Easeful Death:” Review of the FilmHow to Die in Oregon. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 12 (12):66-67.
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  49. Kerri Anne Brussen (2010). Physician Assisted Suicide in the United States of America. Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 16 (2):3.
    Brussen, Kerri Anne This paper is a brief history of suicide, euthanasia, and physician assisted suicide in the United States of America which aims to provide an understanding of the continued and persistent effort in the USA to legalise physician assisted suicide. Oregon and Washington State Dying with Dignity Laws are reviewed as examples of legalised physician assisted suicide.
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  50. Hilde Buiting, Johannes van Delden, Bregje Onwuteaka-Philpsen, Judith Rietjens, Mette Rurup, Donald van Tol, Joseph Gevers, Paul van Der Maas & Agnes van Der Heide (2009). Reporting of Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide in the Netherlands: Descriptive Study. BMC Medical Ethics 10 (1):18-.
    BackgroundAn important principle underlying the Dutch Euthanasia Act is physicians' responsibility to alleviate patients' suffering. The Dutch Act states that euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are not punishable if the attending physician acts in accordance with criteria of due care. These criteria concern the patient's request, the patient's suffering (unbearable and hopeless), the information provided to the patient, the presence of reasonable alternatives, consultation of another physician and the applied method of ending life. To demonstrate their compliance, the Act requires physicians (...)
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