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  1. Philippe Ambrosi (2006). Attention au Rythme du Changement Climatique ! Natures Sciences Sociétés 14 (2):133-143.
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  2. Fatema Amijee (2013). The Role of Attention in Russell's Theory of Knowledge. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (6):1175-1193.
    In his Problems of Philosophy, Bertrand Russell distinguished knowledge by acquaintance and knowledge of truths. This paper argues for a new interpretation of the relationship between these two species of knowledge. I argue that knowledge by acquaintance of an object neither suffices for knowledge that one is acquainted with the object, nor puts a subject in a position to know that she is acquainted with the object. These conclusions emerge from a thorough examination of the central role played by attention (...)
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  3. Charles H. Anderson, David C. Van Essen & Bruno A. Olshausen (2005). Directed Visual Attention and the Dynamic Control of Information Flow. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press.
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  4. J. R. Angell (1892). Experimental Research Upon the Phenomena of Attention. Philosophical Review 1:688.
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  5. Roswell P. Angier (1910). Pillsbury's Attention. Journal of Philosophy 7:45.
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  6. P. Sven Arvidson (2013). Restructuring Attentionality and Intentionality. Human Studies 36 (2):199-216.
    Phenomenology and experimental psychology have been largely interested in the same thing when it comes to attention. By building on the work of Aron Gurwitsch, especially his ideas of attention and restructuration, this paper attempts to articulate common ground in psychology and phenomenology of attention through discussion of a new way to think about multistability in some phenomena. What psychology views as an attentionality-intentionality phenomenon, phenomenology views as an intentionality-attentionality phenomenon. The proposal is that an awareness of this restructuring of (...)
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  7. T. Bahri & R. Parasuraman (1989). Covert Shifts of Attention Enhance Vigilance. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 27 (6):490-490.
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  8. Pierre Baldi (2005). Surprise: A Shortcut for Attention. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. 24--28.
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  9. Paolo Bartolomeo (2008). Varieties of Attention and of Consciousness: Evidence From Neuropsychology. Psyche 14 (1).
    Do we need to attend to an object in order to be conscious of it, and are the objects of our attention necessarily part of our conscious experience? A tight link between attention and consciousness has often been assumed, but it has recently been questioned, on the basis of psychophysical evidence suggesting a double dissociation between top-down attention and consciousness. The present review proposes to consider these issues in the light of time-honored distinctions between exogenous and endogenous forms of attention (...)
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  10. Bernard H. Baumrin (1986). Moral Blindness. Metaphilosophy 17 (4):205-213.
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  11. P. Bisiacchi & M. Proverbio (1991). Visuospatial Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):511-511.
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  12. Ned Block (2013). The Grain of Vision and the Grain of Attention. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):170-184.
    Often when there is no attention to an object, there is no conscious perception of it either, leading some to conclude that conscious perception is an attentional phenomenon. There is a well-known perceptual phenomenon—visuo-spatial crowding, in which objects are too closely packed for attention to single out one of them. This article argues that there is a variant of crowding—what I call ‘‘identity-crowding’’—in which one can consciously see a thing despite failure of attention to it. This conclusion, together with new (...)
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  13. E. G. Boring (1970). Attention: Research and Beliefs Concerning the Conception in Scientific Psychology Before 1930. In D. Mostofsky (ed.), Attention: Contemporary Theory and Analysis. Appleton-Century-Crofts. 5--7.
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  14. F. H. Bradley (1887). On a Feature of Active Attention. Mind 12 (46):314.
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  15. Jochen Braun (2001). It's Great But Not Necessarily About Attention. Psyche 7.
    I point out that Mack and Rock manipulated both expectation and attention and suggest that their results may have been caused by lack of expectation rather than lack of attention. This alternative reading of Mack and Rock's results is supported by other findings, which suggest that 'pure' manipulations of expectation produce 'blindness' whereas 'pure' manipulations of attention do not. Why should failure to expect or anticipate a stimulus lead to 'blindness'? In psychophysics, stimuli near threshold typically require a degree of (...)
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  16. V. Brown (1992). Dynamic Reallocation of Visual-Attention Within an Experimental Trial. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):469-469.
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  17. Charles M. Butter (1987). Varieties of Attention and Disturbances of Attention: A Neuropsychological Analysis. In M. Jeannerod (ed.), Neurophysiological and Neuropsychological Aspects of Spatial Neglect. Elsevier Science Ltd. 45--1.
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  18. Clotilde Calabi (1994). The Choosing Mind and the Judging Will an Analysis of Attention.
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  19. John Campbell (2011). Visual Attention and the Epistemic Role of Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 323.
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  20. M. Cheal & D. R. Lyon (1988). Evidence Against a Moving Spotlight Theory of Visual-Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):509-509.
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  21. Dolly Chugh & Max H. Bazerman (2007). Bounded Awareness: What You Fail to See Can Hurt You. [REVIEW] Mind and Society 6 (1):1-18.
    ObjectiveWe argue that people often fail to perceive and process stimuli easily available to them. In other words, we challenge the tacit assumption that awareness is unbounded and provide evidence that humans regularly fail to see and use stimuli and information easily available to them. We call this phenomenon “bounded awareness” (Bazerman and Chugh in Frontiers of social psychology: negotiations, Psychology Press: College Park 2005). Findings We begin by first describing perceptual mental processes in which obvious information is missed—that is, (...)
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  22. Austen Clark (2006). Attention & Inscrutability: A Commentary on John Campbell, Reference and Consciousness for the Pacific APA Meeting, Pasadena, California, 2004. Philosophical Studies 127 (2):167-193.
    We assemble here in this time and place to discuss the thesis that conscious attention can provide knowledge of reference of perceptual demonstratives. I shall focus my commentary on what this claim means, and on the main argument for it found in the first five chapters of "Reference and Consciousness". The middle term of that argument is an account of what attention does: what its job or function is. There is much that is admirable in this account, and I am (...)
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  23. Austen Clark & Manchester Hall, Attention & Inscrutability.
    We assemble here in this time and place to discuss the thesis that conscious attention can provide knowledge of reference of perceptual demonstratives. I shall focus my commentary on what this claim means, and on the main argument for it found in the first five chapters of Reference and Consciousness. The middle term of that argument is an account of what attention does: what its job or function is. There is much that is admirable in this account, and I am (...)
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  24. Paul Coates (2003). Review of Is the Visual World a Grand Illusion?. [REVIEW] Human Nature Review 3:176-182.
    A cluster of experiments on “Change Blindness”, “Inattentional Blindness” and associated phenomena appear to demonstrate extremely counter intuitive results. According to one plausible characterisation, these results show that we consciously take in far less of the visual world than it seems we are aware of. It is worth briefly summarising the results of two recent sets of experiments, in order to give a flavour of this work. In ‘Gorillas in our Midst’ (Simons, D. and Chabris, C., Perception, 1999, 28), subjects (...)
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  25. S. M. Cockle & A. T. Smith (1996). The Effects of Scopolamine on Covert Orientation of Attention. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 140-140.
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  26. Jennifer T. Coull (2005). Psychopharmacology of Human Attention. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. 33--50.
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  27. Nelson Cowan (2012). Focused and Divided Attention to the Eyes and Ears : A Research Journey. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press. 32.
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  28. Laila Craighero & Giacomo Rizzolatti (2005). The Premotor Theory of Attention. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. 181--186.
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  29. Revault D'Allonnes (1914). L'attention indirecte. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 77:32 - 54.
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  30. H. Daniel (1968). Piow Capture. In Peter Koestenbaum (ed.), Proceedings. [San Jose? Calif.. 1--291.
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  31. Jonathan C. Davis & Marilyn C. Smith (1972). Memory for Unattended Input. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):380.
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  32. Dorothea Debus (2013). Losing Oneself : On the Value of Full Attention. European Journal of Philosophy 23 (1).
    The present paper considers the question whether, and if so how, a subject's full attention to an object which she interacts with might have value. More specifically, I defend the claim that in order for a subject's activity to have value, it is sufficient that the subject give her full attention to the object towards which the activity is directed.
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  33. Andreas Dorschel (2011). Prosa der Aufmerksamkeit. In Jürgen Hosemann (ed.), Die Zeit, das Schweigen und die Toten. Fischer Taschenbuch Verlag. 258-261.
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  34. R. S. Downie (1965). Attention. Philosophical Books 6 (3):30-31.
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  35. Naomi M. Eilan, Self-Location, Consciousness, and Attention.
    ‘Like the shadow of one’s own head, [the referent of one’s ‘I’ thoughts] will not wait to be jumped on. And yet it is never very far ahead; indeed, sometimes it does not seem to be ahead of the pursuer at all. It evades capture by lodging itself in the very inside of the muscles of the pursuer. It is too near even to be within arm’s reach.’(C of M 177-89).
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  36. Charles W. Eriksen & James F. Collins (1969). Temporal Course of Selective Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (2p1):254.
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  37. Karla Evans & Sang Chul Chong (2012). Distributed Attention and its Implication for Visual Perception. In Jeremy M. Wolfe & Lynn C. Robertson (eds.), From Perception to Consciousness: Searching with Anne Treisman. Oxford University Press.
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  38. Fern (1999). Perceptual Consciousness and the Reflexive Character of Attention. In Jos Falguera (ed.), La Filosof. Santiago de Compostela: S.I.E.U..
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  39. David H. Finkelstein (1999). On Self-Blindness and Inner Sense. Philosophical Topics 26 (1/2):105-19.
  40. L. R. Fournier & C. W. Eriksen (1991). All-or-None Versus a Graded Process Conception of Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):518-518.
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  41. Lyat Friedman (2014). Evenly Suspended Distractive Attention. Techné: Research in Philosophy and Technology 18 (1/2):84-101.
    This article reviews recent cognitive and neurological approaches to the study of attention. It argues that such research is based on the notion that attention has a positive cognitive function selecting, like a sieve or a filter, elements from the background and foreground, to then be processed by the brain and made conscious when required. These approaches fail to explain cognitive overload and recent findings demonstrating that recognition and understanding—sensory, visual and semantic—also occur prior to attention. Merleau-Ponty and Freud offer (...)
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  42. Shahab Ghorashi, Lisa Jefferies, Jun-Ichiro Kawahara & Katsumi Watanabe (2008). Does Attention Accompany the Conscious Awareness of Both Location and Identity of an Object? Psyche 14 (1).
    The question of whether consciousness and attention are the same or different phenomena has always been controversial. In trying to find an answer to this question, two different measures for consciousness and attention were used to provide the potential for dissociating between them. Conscious awareness of either the location or the identity of the object was measured as the percentage of correct reports of that aspect. The location of the focus of attention, on the other hand, was determined using the (...)
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  43. Eleanor Gibson & Nancy Rader (1979). Attention. In G. Hale & M. Lewis (eds.), Attention and Cognitive Development. Plenum.. 1--21.
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  44. Daniel Gopher (1993). The Skill of Attention Control: Acquisition and Execution of Attention Strategies. In David E. Meyer & Sylvan Kornblum (eds.), Attention and Performance Xiv. The Mit Press. 299--322.
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  45. Daniel Gopher & Cristina Iani (2003). Attention. In L. Nadel (ed.), Encyclopedia of Cognitive Science. Nature Publishing Group.
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  46. Anthony G. Greenwald (1972). Evidence of Both Perceptual Filtering and Response Suppression for Rejected Messages in Selective Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 94 (1):58.
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  47. Lawrence T. Guzy & Seymour Axelrod (1972). Interaural Attention Shifting as Response. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (2):290.
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  48. Gordon A. Hale (1979). Development of Children's Attention to Stimulus Components. In G. Hale & M. Lewis (eds.), Attention and Cognitive Development. Plenum.. 43--64.
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  49. James S. Hans (1993). The Mysteries of Attention. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  50. Jason Harrison & Ronald A. Rensink, Obscuring Length Changes During Animated Motion.
    In this paper we examine to what extent the lengths of the links in an animated articulated figure can be changed without the viewer being aware of the change. This is investigated in terms of a framework that emphasizes the role of attention in visual perception. We conducted a set of five experiments to establish bounds for the sensitivity to changes in length as a function of several parameters and the amount of attention available. We found that while length changes (...)
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