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  1. Karl Ameriks (1976). Personal Identity and Memory Transfer. Southern Journal of Philosophy 14 (4):385-391.
  2. Sharon Anderson-Gold (2005). Memory, Identity, and Cultural Authority. Social Philosophy Today 21:249-252.
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  3. Rafael Argullol (2004). The Eros of Memory. Diogenes 51 (1):49-53.
    The author considers the tension and contradiction between memory and consciousness. Memory brings to the surface the critical peaks of our lives and weaves them into the present, but in a seemingly arbitrary way that the author describes as the ‘instinct of consciousness’; memory constructs a secret story, a personal ‘golden age’, of our lives that diverges from the official story we try to legitimize, not only to the external world but also in our own personal world. This secret story (...)
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  4. Bernard J. Armada (2010). Memory's Execution : (Dis)Placing the Dissident Body. In Greg Dickinson, Carole Blair & Brian L. Ott (eds.), Places of Public Memory: The Rhetoric of Museums and Memorials. University of Alabama Press.
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  5. Myriam Ávila (2006). Ascensão da autobiografia: declínio do sujeito. Kriterion 47 (114):439-442.
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  6. Eugene F. Bales (1990). Memory, Forgetfulness and the Disclosure of Being in Heidegger and Plotinus. Philosophy Today 34 (2):141-151.
  7. William P. Banks & Kathy Pezdek (1994). The Recovered Memory/False Memory Debate. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):265-268.
  8. Kathy Behrendt (2013). Hirsch, Sebald, and the Uses and Limits of Postmemory. In Russell J. A. Kilbourn & Eleanor Ty (eds.), The Memory Effect: The Remediation of Memory in Literature and Film. Wilfrid Laurier University Press. 51-67.
    Marianne Hirsch’s influential concept of postmemory articulates the ethical significance of representing trauma in art and literature. Postmemory, for Hirsch, “describes the relationship of children of survivors of cultural or collective trauma to the experiences of their parents, experiences that they ‘remember’ only as the narratives and images with which they grew up, but that are so powerful, so monumental, as to constitute memories in their own right”. Through appeal to recent philosophical work on memory, the ethics of remembering, and (...)
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  9. Kathy Behrendt (2010). Scraping Down the Past: Memory and Amnesia in W. G. Sebald's Anti-Narrative. Philosophy and Literature 34 (2):394-408.
    Vanguard anti-narrativist Galen Strawson declares personal memory unimportant for self-constitution. But what if lapses of personal memory are sustained by a morally reprehensible amnesia about historical events, as happens in the work of W.G. Sebald? The importance of memory cannot be downplayed in such cases. Nevertheless, contrary to expectations, a concern for memory needn’t ally one with the narrativist position. Recovery of historical and personal memory results in self-dissolution and not self-unity or understanding in Sebald’s characters. In the end, Sebald (...)
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  10. J. L. Bermudez (2013). Immunity to Error Through Misidentification and Past-Tense Memory Judgements. Analysis 73 (2):211-220.
    Autobiographical memories typically give rise either to memory reports (“I remember going swimming”) or to first person past-tense judgements (“I went swimming”). This article focuses on first person past-tense judgements that are (epistemically) based on autobiographical memories. Some of these judgements have the IEM property of being immune to error through misidentification. This article offers an account of when and why first person past-tense judgements have the IEM property.
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  11. Jose Luis Bermudez (2012). Memory Judgments and Immunity to Error Through Misidentification. Grazer Philosophische Studien 84 (1):123-142.
  12. Sven Bernecker (2011). Further Thoughts on Memory: Replies to Schechtman, Adams, and Goldberg. Philosophical Studies 153 (1):109-121.
    This is a response to three critical discussions of my book Memory: A Philosophical Study (Oxford University Press 2010): Marya Schechtman, Memory and Identity , Fred Adams, Husker Du? , and Sanford Goldberg The Metasemantics of Memory.
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  13. Christopher Birch (2000). Memory and Punishment. Criminal Justice Ethics 19 (2):17-31.
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  14. Jeffrey Blustein (2008). The Moral Demands of Memory. Cambridge University Press.
    There is considerable contemporary interest in memory, both within the academy and in the public sphere. Little has been written by moral philosophers on the subject, however. In this timely book, Jeffrey Blustein explores the moral aspects and implications of memory, both personal and collective. He provides a systematic and philosophically rigorous account of a morality of memory, focusing on the value of memory, its relationship to identity, and the responsibilities associated with memory.
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  15. Jeffrey Blustein (2000). On Taking Responsibility for One’s Past. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):1–19.
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  16. Jeffrey Blustein (1999). Choosing for Others as Continuing a Life Story: The Problem of Personal Identity Revisited. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 27 (1):20-31.
  17. R. Bodei (1992). Farewell to the Past: Historical Memory, Oblivion and Collective Identity. Philosophy and Social Criticism 18 (3-4):251-265.
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  18. George Bragues (2009). Memory and Morals in Memento : Hume at the Movies. Film-Philosophy 12 (2).
  19. Kathryn A. Braun, Rhiannon Ellis & Elizabeth F. Loftus (2002). Make My Memory: How Advertising Can Change Our Memories of the Past. Psychology and Marketing 19 (1):1-23.
    Marketers use autobiographical advertising as a means to create nostalgia for their products. This research explores whether such referencing can cause people to believe that they had experiences as children that are mentioned in the ads. In Experiment 1, participants viewed an ad for Disney that suggested that they shook hands with Mickey Mouse as a child. Relative to controls, the ad increased their confidence that they personally had shaken hands with Mickey as a child at a Disney resort. The (...)
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  20. Christopher Buford (2009). Memory, Quasi-Memory, and Pseudo-Quasi-Memory. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 87 (3):465 – 478.
    Bishop Butler objected to Locke's theory of personal identity on the grounds that memory presupposes personal identity. Most of those sympathetic with Locke's account have accepted Butler's criticism, and have sought to devise a theory of personal identity in the spirit of Locke's that avoids Butler's circularity objection. John McDowell has argued that even the more recent accounts of personal identity are vulnerable to the kind of objection Butler raised against Locke's own account. I criticize McDowell's stance, drawing on a (...)
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  21. Tyler Burge (2004). Memory and Persons. Philosophical Review 112 (3):289-337.
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  22. Sue Campbell (2006). Our Faithfulness to the Past: Reconstructing Memory Value. Philosophical Psychology 19 (3):361 – 380.
    The reconstructive turn in memory theory challenges us to provide an account of successful remembering that is attentive to the ways in which we use memory, both individually and socially. I investigate conceptualizations of accuracy and integrity useful to memory theorists and argue that faithful recollection is often a complex epistemological/ethical achievement.
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  23. Sue Campbell (1997). Women, "False" Memory, and Personal Identity. Hypatia 12 (2):51 - 82.
    We contest each other's memory claims all the time. I am concerned with how the contesting of memory claims and narratives may be an integral part of many abusive situations. I use the writings of Otto Weininger and the False Memory Syndrome Foundation to explore a particular strategy of discrediting women as rememberers, making them more vulnerable to sexual harm. This strategy relies on the presentation of women as unable to maintain a stable enough sense of self or identity to (...)
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  24. Stephen J. Ceci, Mary Lyndia Crotteau Huffman, Elliott Smith & Elizabeth F. Loftus (1994). Repeatedly Thinking About a Non-Event: Source Misattributions Among Preschoolers. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):388-407.
  25. Ross E. Cheit (1999). Junk Skepticism and Recovered Memory: A Reply to Piper. Ethics and Behavior 9 (4):295 – 318.
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  26. Ross E. Cheit (1998). Consider This, Skeptics of Recovered Memory. Ethics and Behavior 8 (2):141 – 160.
    Some self-proclaimed skeptics of recovered memory claim that traumatic childhood events simply cannot be forgotten at the time only to be remembered later in life. This claim has been made repeatedly by the Advisory Board members of a prominent advocacy group for parents accused of sexual abuse, the so-called False Memory Syndrome Foundation. The research project described in this article identifies and documents the growing number of cases that have been ignored or distorted by such skeptics. To date, this project (...)
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  27. John Christman (2008). Why Search for Lost Time: Memory, Autonomy, and Practical Reason. In Catriona Mackenzie & Kim Atkins (eds.), Practical Identity and Narrative Agency. Routledge.
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  28. Arthur W. Collins (1997). Personal Identity and the Coherence of Q-Memory. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (186):73-80.
    Brian Garrett constructs cases satisfying Andy Hamilton’s definition of weak q‐memory. This does not establish that a peculiar kind of memory is at least conceptually coherent. Any ‘apparent memory experiences’ that satisfy the definition turn out not to involve remembering anything at all. This conclusion follows if we accept, as both Hamilton and Garrett do, a variety of first‐person authority according to which memory judgements may be false, but not on the ground that someone other than the remembering subject had (...)
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  29. Rebecca Copenhaver, Reid on Memory and Personal Identity. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  30. Sharon Crowley (2000). Memory, Identity, Community: The Idea of Narrative in the Human Sciences (Review). [REVIEW] Philosophy and Rhetoric 33 (2):187-191.
  31. Felipe De Brigard (2012). Influence of Outcome Valence in the Subjective Experience of Episodic Past, Future, and Counterfactual Thinking. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1085-1096.
  32. Dorothea Debus, Memory, Imagination and Narrative.
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  33. Dorothea Debus (2007). Perspectives on the Past: A Study of the Spatial Perspectival Characteristics of Recollective Memories. Mind and Language 22 (2):173-206.
    The following paper considers one important feature of our experiential or ‘recollective’ memories, namely their spatial perspectival characteristics. I begin by considering the ‘Past-Dependency-Claim’, which states that every recollective memory (or ‘R-memory’) has its spatial perspectival characteristics in virtue of the subject’s present awareness of the spatial perspectival characteristics of a relevant past perceptual experience. Although the Past-Dependency-Claim might for various reasons seem particularly attractive, I show that it is false. I then proceed to develop and defend the ‘Present-Dependency-Claim’, namely (...)
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  34. Dorothea Debus (2007). Being Emotional About the Past: On the Nature and Role of Past-Directed Emotions. Noûs 41 (4):758-779.
    We sometimes experience emotions which are directed at past events (or situations) which we witnessed at the time when they occurred (or obtained). The present paper explores the role which such "autobiographically past-directed emotions" (or "APD-emotions") play in a subject's mental life. A defender of the "Memory-Claim" holds that an APD-emotion is a memory, namely a memory of the emotion which the subject experienced at the time when the event originally occurred (or the situation obtained) towards which the APD-emotion is (...)
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  35. Matthew Hugh Erdelyi (2006). The Unified Theory of Repression. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):499-511.
    Repression has become an empirical fact that is at once obvious and problematic. Fragmented clinical and laboratory traditions and disputed terminology have resulted in a Babel of misunderstandings in which false distinctions are imposed (e.g., between repression and suppression) and necessary distinctions not drawn (e.g., between the mechanism and the use to which it is put, defense being just one). “Repression” was introduced by Herbart to designate the (nondefensive) inhibition of ideas by other ideas in their struggle for consciousness. Freud (...)
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  36. Alexandre Erler (2011). Does Memory Modification Threaten Our Authenticity? Neuroethics 4 (3):235-249.
    One objection to enhancement technologies is that they might lead us to live inauthentic lives. Memory modification technologies (MMTs) raise this worry in a particularly acute manner. In this paper I describe four scenarios where the use of MMTs might be said to lead to an inauthentic life. I then undertake to justify that judgment. I review the main existing accounts of authenticity, and present my own version of what I call a “true self” account (intended as a complement, rather (...)
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  37. Kathinka Evers (2007). Perspectives on Memory Manipulation: Using Beta-Blockers to Cure Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 16 (02):138-146.
  38. Gary D. Fireman, T. E. McVay & Owen J. Flanagan (eds.) (2003). Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology and the Brain. Oxford University Press.
    We define our conscious experience by constructing narratives about ourselves and the people with whom we interact. Narrative pervades our lives--conscious experience is not merely linked to the number and variety of personal stories we construct with each other within a cultural frame, but is subsumed by them. The claim, however, that narrative constructions are essential to conscious experience is not useful or informative unless we can also begin to provide a distinct, organized, and empirically consistent explanation for narrative in (...)
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  39. Robyn Fivush (1995). Language, Narrative, and Autobiography. Consciousness and Cognition 4 (1):100-103.
  40. Robyn Fivush (1994). Young Children′s Event Recall: Are Memories Constructed Through Discourse? Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):356-373.
  41. Maryanne Garry, Elizabeth F. Loftus & Scott W. Brown (1994). Memory: A River Runs Through It. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):438-451.
  42. Daniel Giberman (2009). Who They Are and What de Se: Burge on Quasi-Memory. Philosophical Studies 144 (2):297 - 311.
    Tyler Burge has recently argued that quasi-memory-based psychological reductionist accounts of diachronic personal identity are deeply problematic. According to Burge, these accounts either fail to include appropriately de se elements or presuppose facts about diachronic personal identity—facts of the very kind that the accounts are supposed to explain. Neither of these objections is compelling. The first is based in confusion about the version of reductionism to which it putatively applies. The second loses its force when we recognize that reductionism is (...)
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  43. P. Goldie (2005). Narrative and Consciousness: Literature, Psychology, and the Brain. British Journal of Aesthetics 45 (4):443-445.
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  44. Gail S. Goodman, Jodi A. Quas, Jennifer M. Batterman-Faunce, M. M. Riddlesberger & Jerald Kuhn (1994). Predictors of Accurate and Inaccurate Memories of Traumatic Events Experienced in Childhood. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):269-294.
  45. George Graham (1996). Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory. Ian Hacking. [REVIEW] Ethics 106 (4):845-.
  46. Christopher Grau (2006). Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind and the Morality of Memory. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 64 (1):119–133.
    In this essay I argue that the film Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind eloquently and powerfully suggests a controversial philosophical position: that the harm caused by voluntary memory removal cannot be entirely understood in terms of harms that are consciously experienced. I explore this possibility through a discussion of the film that includes consideration of Nagel and Nozick on unexperienced harms, Kant on duties to oneself, and Murdoch on the requirements of morality.
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  47. Terence Greenwood (1967). Personal Identity and Memory. Philosophical Quarterly 17 (October):334-344.
  48. Johan E. Gustafsson (2010). Did Locke Defend the Memory Continuity Criterion of Personal Identity? Locke Studies 10:113–129.
    John Locke’s account of personal identity is usually thought to have been proved false by Thomas Reid’s simple ‘Gallant Officer’ argument. Locke is traditionally interpreted as holding that your having memories of a past person’s thoughts or actions is necessary and sufficient for your being identical to that person. This paper argues that the traditional memory interpretation of Locke’s account is mistaken and defends a memory continuity view according to which a sequence of overlapping memories is necessary and sufficient for (...)
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  49. Ian Hacking (1995). Rewriting the Soul: Multiple Personality and the Sciences of Memory. Princeton University Press.
    Here the distinguished philosopher Ian Hacking uses the MPD epidemic and its links with the contemporary concept of child abuse to scrutinize today's moral...
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  50. Garry Hagberg (2008). Describing Ourselves: Wittgenstein and Autobiographical Consciousness. Oxford University Press.
    The voluminous writings of Ludwig Wittgenstein contain some of the most profound reflections of recent times on the nature of the human subject and self-understanding - the human condition, philosophically speaking. Describing Ourselves mines those extensive writings for a conception of the self that stands in striking contrast to its predecessors as well as its more recent alternatives. More specifically, the book offers a detailed discussion of Wittgenstein's later writings on language and mind as they hold special significance for the (...)
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