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  1. Mitchell Aboulafia (2010). Transcendence: On Self-Determination and Cosmopolitanism. Stanford University Press.
    Don't fence me in : Rorty and Sartre -- On freedom and action : Dewey and Sartre -- A (neo) American in Paris : Bourdieu and Mead -- Mead on cosmopolitanism, sympathy, and war -- W.E.B. Du Bois : double-consciousness, Jamesian sympathy, and the cosmopolitan -- Self-concept in the new sociology of ideas : reflections on Neil Gross's Richard Rorty : the making of an American philosopher -- Eros and self-determination -- What if Hegel's master and slave were women?
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  2. Fred Adams (2001). Keith Lehrer, Self‐Trust: A Study of Reason, Knowledge, and Autonomy:Self‐Trust: A Study of Reason, Knowledge, and Autonomy. Ethics 111 (2):427-429.
  3. Robert Merrihew Adams (1979). Autonomy and Theological Ethics. Religious Studies 15 (2):191 - 194.
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  4. Kathryn Pyne Addelson (1987). Autonomy and Respect. Journal of Philosophy 84 (11):628-629.
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  5. Amy Allen (2007). The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. Columbia University Press.
    Introduction : the politics of our selves -- Foucault, subjectivity, and the enlightenment : a critical reappraisal -- The impurity of practical reason : power and autonomy in Foucault -- Dependency, subordination, and recognition : Butler on subjection -- Empowering the lifeworld? autonomy and power in Habermas -- Contextualizing critical theory -- Engendering critical theory.
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  6. Tiina Allik (1987). Narrative Approaches to Human Personhood. Philosophy and Theology 1 (4):305-333.
    The essay argues that narrative approaches to human personhood which conceptualize the goal of human personhood in terms of the fulfillment of a capacity for self-constitution by means of deliberate choices tend to make inordinate and inhuman claims for human agency. The narrative approaches of the psychoanalyst and psychoanalytic theorist, Roy Schafter, and of the theologian and ethicist, Stanley Hauerwas, illustrate this. Both thinkers implicitly deny the permanent vulnerability of human agency in the area of the appropriation of narratives. In (...)
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  7. Peter Allmark (2008). An Aristotelian Account of Autonomy. Journal of Value Inquiry 42 (1):41-53.
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  8. Richard Alterman (2000). Rethinking Autonomy. Minds and Machines 10 (1):15-30.
    This paper explores the assumption of autonomy. Several arguments are presented against the assumption of runtime autonomy as a principle of design for artificial intelligence systems. The arguments vary from being theoretical, to practical, and to analytic. The latter parts of the paper focus on one strategy for building non-autonomous systems (the practice view). One critical theme is that intelligence is not located in the system alone, it emerges from a history of interactions among user, builder, and designer over a (...)
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  9. Matthew C. Altman (2012). Kant and Applied Ethics: The Uses and Limits of Kant's Practical Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Animal suffering and moral character -- Kant's strategic importance for environmental ethics -- Moral and legal arguments for universal health care -- The scope of patient autonomy -- Subjecting ourselves to capital punishment -- Same-sex marriage as a means to mutual respect -- Consent, mail-order brides, and the marriage contract -- Individual maxims and social justice -- The decomposition of the corporate body -- On becoming a person -- Conclusion: emerging from Kant's long shadow.
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  10. Matthew C. Altman & Cynthia D. Coe (2007). The Self as Creature and Creator: Fichte and Freud Against the Enlightenment. Idealistic Studies 37 (3):179-202.
    The conception of subjectivity that dominates the Western philosophical tradition, particularly during the Enlightenment, sets up a simple dichotomy: either the subject is ultimately autonomous or it is merely a causally determined thing. Fichte and Freud challenge this model by formulating theories of subjectivity thattranscend this opposition. Fichte conceives of the subject as based in absolute activity, but that activity is qualified by a check for which it is not ultimately responsible. Freud explains the behavior of the self in terms (...)
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  11. Joel Anderson, Autonomy, Vulnerability, Recognition, and Justice.
    One of liberalism’s core commitments is to safeguarding individuals’ autonomy. And a central aspect of liberal social justice is the commitment to protecting the vulnerable. Taken together, and combined with an understanding of autonomy as an acquired set of capacities to lead one’s own life, these commitments suggest that liberal societies should be especially concerned to address vulnerabilities of individuals regarding the development and maintenance of their autonomy. In this chapter, we develop an account of what it would mean for (...)
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  12. Joel Anderson (forthcoming). Autonomy Gaps as a Social Pathology: Ideologiekritik Beyond Paternalism. In Rainer Forst (ed.), Sozialphilosophie und Kritik. Suhrkamp.
    From the outset, critical social theory has sought to diagnose people’s participation in their own oppression, by revealing the roots of irrational and self-undermining choices in the complex interplay between human nature, social structures, and cultural beliefs. As part of this project, Ideologiekritik has aimed to expose faulty conceptions of this interplay, so that the objectively pathological character of what people are “freely” choosing could come more clearly into view. The challenge, however, has always been to find a way of (...)
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  13. Joel Anderson (2008). Disputing Autonomy: Second-Order Desires and the Dynamics of Ascribing Autonomy. SATS 9 (1):7-26.
    In this paper, I examine two versions of the so-called “hierarchical” approach to personal autonomy, based on the notion of “second-order desires”. My primary concern will be with the question of whether these approaches provide an adequate basis for understanding the dynamics of autonomy-ascription. I begin by distinguishing two versions of the hierarchical approach, each representing a different response to the oft-discussed “regress” objection. I then argue that both “structural hierarchicalism” (e.g., Frankfurt, Bratman) and “procedural hierarchicalism” (e.g., Dworkin, Christman, Mele) (...)
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  14. Joel Anderson (2003). Autonomy and the Authority of Personal Commitments: From Internal Coherence to Social Normativity. Philosophical Explorations 6 (2):90 – 108.
    It has been argued - most prominently in Harry Frankfurt's recent work - that the normative authority of personal commitments derives not from their intrinsic worth but from the way in which one's will is invested in what one cares about. In this essay, I argue that even if this approach is construed broadly and supplemented in various ways, its intrasubjective character leaves it ill-prepared to explain the normative grip of commitments in cases of purported self-betrayal. As an alternative, I (...)
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  15. Kristin Andrews (2003). Neurophilosophy of Free Will: From Libertarian Illusions to a Concept of Natural Autonomy by Henrik Walter. Philo 6 (1):166-175.
  16. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Review of kWong-Loi Shun, David B. Wong (Eds.), Confucian Ethics: A Comparative Study of Self, Autonomy, and Community. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (12).
  17. Andre M. Archie (2010). The Anatomy of a Dialogue. Journal of Philosophical Research 35:129-146.
    This paper shows Socratic elenchus as an efficient and effective way of modeling rational knowledge seeking. Like ordinary conversations, the elenctic exchanges in the dialogues presuppose a degree of autonomy on the part of its participants. Socrates’ line of questioning often seems pertinent to a particular interlocutor because he is well aware of the fact that the interlocutor has goals and ambitions or is reputed to be an expert at something. In turn, Socrates’ line ofquestioning reflects his own goals and (...)
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  18. Aurelia Armstrong (2009). Autonomy and the Relational Individual : Spinoza and Feminism. In Moira Gatens (ed.), Feminist Interpretations of Benedict Spinoza. Pennsylvania State University Press.
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  19. Richard J. Arneson, What, If Anything, Renders All Humans Morally Equal?
    All humans have an equal basic moral status. They possess the same fundamental rights, and the comparable interests of each person should count the same in calculations that determine social policy. Neither supposed racial differences, nor skin color, sex, sexual orientation, ethnicity, intelligence, nor any other differences among humans negate their fundamental equal worth and dignity. These platitudes are virtually universally affirmed. A white supremacist racist or an admirer of Adolf Hitler who denies them is rightly regarded as beyond the (...)
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  20. Denis G. Arnold (1998). Bernard Berofsky, Liberation From the Self: A Theory of Personal Autonomy, Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995, Pp. 270. [REVIEW] Utilitas 10 (3):368-.
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  21. Robert Arp (2007). Vindicating Kant's Morality. International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (1):5-22.
    Among others, four significant criticisms have been leveled against Kant’s morality. These criticisms are that Kant’s morality lacks a motivational component, thatit ignores the spiritual dimensions of morality espoused by a virtue-based ethics, that it overemphasizes the principle of autonomy in neglecting the communal context of morality, and that it lacks a theological foundation in being detached from God. In this paper I attempt to show that, when understood in the broader context of his religious doctrines and the overall philosophical (...)
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  22. W. Ross Ashby, Adaptive Behaviour, Autonomy and Value Systems.
    Computational functionalism [5] fails to understand the embodied and situated nature of behaviour by taking steady state functions as theoretical primitives, and by interpreting cognitive behaviour from a language-like, observer dependant framework without a naturalized normativity. Evolutionary functionalism [28, 27], on the other hand, by grounding functional normativity on historical processes fails to give an account of normative functionality based on the present causal mechanism producing behaviour. We propose an alternative autonomous dynamical framework where functionality is defined as contribution to (...)
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  23. Kim Atkins (2008). Narrative Identity and Moral Identity: A Practical Perspective. Routledge.
    This book is part of the growing field of practical approaches to philosophical questions relating to identity, agency and ethics, working across continental and analytical traditions. Kim Atkins explains and justifies the basis of the practical approach through an explication of the structures of human embodiment and an account of how those structures necessitate a narrative model of selfhood, understanding and ethics. She highlights how recent work on agency and autonomy implicitly draws upon conceptions of embodiment and intersubjectivity that underpin (...)
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  24. Kim Atkins (2000). Autonomy and the Subjective Character of Experience. Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):71–79.
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  25. Robin Attfield (2005). Biocentric Consequentialism and Value-Pluralism: A Response to Alan Carter. Utilitas 17 (1):85-92.
    My theory of biocentric consequentialism is first shown not to be significantly inegalitarian, despite not advocating treating all creatures equally. I then respond to Carter's objections concerning population, species extinctions, the supposed minimax implication, endangered interests, autonomy and thought-experiments. Biocentric consequentialism is capable of supporting a sustainable human population at a level compatible with preserving most non-human species, as opposed to catastrophic population increases or catastrophic decimation. Nor is it undermined by the mere conceivable possibility of counter-intuitive implications. While Carter (...)
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  26. A. Autiero & L. Galvagni (2010). Religious Issues and the Question of Moral Autonomy. In James J. Giordano & Bert Gordijn (eds.), Scientific and Philosophical Perspectives in Neuroethics. Cambridge University Press.
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  27. Richard Avramenko (2011). Courage: The Politics of Life and Limb. University of Notre Dame Press.
    Preface -- (Re)introducing courage -- Martial courage and honor -- Political courage and justice -- Moral courage and autonomy -- Economic courage and wealth -- The aftermath.
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  28. Carla Bagnoli (2007). Respect and Membership in the Moral Community. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (2):113 - 128.
    Some philosophers object that Kant's respect cannot express mutual recognition because it is an attitude owed to persons in virtue of an abstract notion of autonomy and invite us to integrate the vocabulary of respect with other persons-concepts or to replace it with a social conception of recognition. This paper argues for a dialogical interpretation of respect as the key-mode of recognition of membership in the moral community. This interpretation highlights the relational and practical nature of respect, and accounts for (...)
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  29. Sorin Baiasu (2010). Kant and Sartre: Re-Discovering Critical Ethics. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction * Kant and Sartre * Methodology * PART I: KANT * Agency * Identity * Freedom * Autonomy * Normativity * Happiness and Virtue * Moral and Political Knowledge * Action-guiding Criteria * PART II: SARTRE AND KANT * Person * The 'I think' * Psychological Rationalism and Empiricism * Synthesis and Analysis * Freedom * Disposition and Project * Determinism and Arbitrariness * Causation and Projection * Morality *. Imperative and Value * Insensitiveness to (...)
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  30. Tom Bailey (2002). Kant and Autonomy Conference. Kant-Studien 93 (4):488-490.
  31. Paula Banerjee & Samir Kumar Das (eds.) (2007/2008). Autonomy: Beyond Kant and Hermeneutics. Anthem Press.
    would suspect him of murdering them and would not spare him. So he too killed himself. Gods were very much disturbed by this sad incident and realized the ...
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  32. Paula Banerjee & Samir Kumar Das (2007). Editorial Introduction. In Paula Banerjee & Samir Kumar Das (eds.), Autonomy: Beyond Kant and Hermeneutics. Anthem Press.
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  33. Michael D. Barber (2008). Autonomy, Reciprocity, and Responsibility: Darwall and Levinas on the Second Person. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 16 (5):629 – 644.
    Stephen Darwall's The Second-Person Standpoint converges with Emmanuel Levinas's concern about the role of the second-person relationship in ethics. This paper contrasts their methodologies (regressive analysis of presuppositions versus phenomenology) to explain Darwall's narrower view of ethical experience in terms of expressed reactive attitudes. It delineates Darwall's overall justificatory strategy and the centrality of autonomy and reciprocity within it, in contrast to Levinas's emphasis on the experience of responsibility. Asymmetrical responsibility plays a more foundational role as a critical counterpoint to (...)
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  34. F. M. Barnard (1988). Self-Direction and Political Legitimacy: Rousseau and Herder. Oxford University.
    Johann Gottfried Herder (1744-1803) has been called the German Rousseau. Yet while Rousseau is recognized as a political thinker, Herder is not. This book explores each thinker's ideas--on nature and culture, selfhood and mutuality, paternalism, freedom, and autonomy--and compares their conceptions of legitimate statehood. Arguing that the crux of political legitimacy for both men was the possibility of "extended selfhood," Barnard shows that Herder, like Rousseau, profoundly altered human self-understandings, thus influencing modes of justifying political allegiance.
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  35. Marcia Baron (1993). Book Review:Autonomy and Self-Respect. Thomas E. Hill, Jr. [REVIEW] Ethics 103 (3):576-.
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  36. Peter Brian Barry (2011). In Defense of the Mirror Thesis. Philosophical Studies 155 (2):199-205.
    In this journal, Luke Russell defends a sophisticated dispositional account of evil personhood according to which a person is evil just in case she is strongly and highly fixedly disposed to perform evil actions in conditions that favour her autonomy. While I am generally sympathetic with this account, I argue that Russell wrongly dismisses the mirror thesis—roughly, the thesis that evil people are the mirror images of the morally best sort of persons—which I have defended elsewhere. Russell’s rejection of the (...)
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  37. Edwina Barvosa-Carter (2007). Mestiza Autonomy as Relational Autonomy: Ambivalence & the Social Character of Free Will. Journal of Political Philosophy 15 (1):1–21.
  38. Stanley Bates (1972). Authority and Autonomy. Journal of Philosophy 64 (7):175-179.
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  39. Per Bauhn (2003). The Value of Courage. Nordic Academic Press.
    Combining in-depth analysis with strikingly apt examples of the role that courage plays in the life of human beings, this major contribution to moral philosophy argues that courage is necessary to personal achievement as well as to the common good of a civic community. Bauhn insists that courage is necessary for reinforcing people's understanding of themselves as autonomous agents, which is in turn necessary for countering widespread feelings of alienation and depression. He defines courage as the ability to confront fear, (...)
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  40. Bernard H. Baumrin (1977). Autonomy, Interest, and the Kantian Interpretation. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 2 (1):280-282.
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  41. Anne Margaret Baxley (2003). Autocracy and Autonomy. Kant-Studien 94 (1):1-23.
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  42. Kenneth Baynes (2007). Freedom as Autonomy. In Brian Leiter & Michael Rosen (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Continental Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  43. S. I. Benn (1975). Freedom, Autonomy and the Concept of a Person. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 76:109 - 130.
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  44. Stanley I. Benn (1988). A Theory of Freedom. Cambridge University Press.
    This book is a major contribution to the study of the philosophy of action, moral philosophy, and political philosophy.
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  45. Jocelyn Benoist, Fulfilment.
    It seems reasonable to say that the basic problem of Husserl’s phenomenology is the possibility for the mind to get related to the world. In Brentano’s view, intentionality was a universal characterization of the mental. In Husserl’s, it becomes as well the framework of the possible contact of the mind with the world. As Hilary Putnam observes: “‘Brentano’s thesis’ was meant by him to serve as a way of showing the autonomy of mentalistic psychology (‘act-psychology’) by showing that the mental (...)
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  46. John Benson (1983). Who Is the Autonomous Man? Philosophy 58 (223):5 - 17.
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  47. Paul Benson (2005). Book Review: Marilyn Friedman. Autonomy, Gender, Politics. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2003. [REVIEW] Hypatia 20 (3):214-217.
  48. Paul Benson (1991). Autonomy and Oppressive Socialization. Social Theory and Practice 17 (3):385-408.
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  49. Fred R. Berger (1985). Paternalism and Autonomy. Bowling Green Studies in Applied Philosophy 7:37-52.
  50. Mark H. Bernstein (1983). Socialization and Autonomy. Mind 92 (January):120-123.
    A problem closely related to the perennial free will question is whether autonomy of persons can be reconciled with socialization. If this latter compatibilism can be established, It would have great bearing on the more general issue of freedom being reconcilable with determinism. In several recent articles robert young has tried to demonstrate the consistency of autonomy with socialization, But the author argues that he has failed to notice the depth and global nature of the socialization critic's position, And as (...)
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