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  1. R. Abelson, L. Addis, K. D. Allen, W. P. Alston, J. T. Andresen, D. M. Armstrong, W. J. Arnold, K. J. Arrow, B. J. Baars & A. Bandura (1999). Comte, X Coombs, CH, 31, 36 Cox. LE, 205,207 Darwin, C., 29, 36. In Bruce A. Thyer (ed.), The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 257.
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  2. Laird Addis (1982). Behaviorism and the Philosophy of the Act. Noûs 16 (3):399-420.
    Behaviorism and the philosophy of the act are widely believed to be inconsistent with one another. I argue that both are true, Fulfilling the requirements of scientific psychology and the phenomenology of mind, Respectively. The key to understanding their mutual consistency lies in the idea of parallelism and its corresponding requirement that all descriptive features of mental states be analyzed as properties, None as relations (to anything physical). So the intentional link itself must be a 'logical' and not a descriptive (...)
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  3. William P. Alston (1972). Can Psychology Do Without Private Data? Behaviorism 1 (1):71-102.
  4. Claudia Arrighi (2006). Suppes From Stimulus-Response to Brain Waves Analysis: A Tale on the White Knight of Behaviorism. Epistemologia 29 (2):267-290.
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  5. Andrew Backe (2000). Book Review:The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism Bruce A. Thyer. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 67 (3):546-.
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  6. F. C. Bartlett (1927). WATSON, J B. - Behaviorism. [REVIEW] Mind 36:77.
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  7. Claude G. Beardslee (1924). Personalism and Behaviorism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 5 (1):12.
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  8. Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.) (2005). Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon.
    This volume will be the starting point for future discussion and research.
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  9. Gustav Bergmann (1940). On Some Methodological Problems of Psychology. Philosophy of Science 7 (April):205-219.
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  10. James Bissett Pratt (1922). Behaviorism and Consciousness. Journal of Philosophy 19 (22):596-604.
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  11. Brand Blanshard (1928). Behaviorism and the Theory of Knowledge. Philosophical Review 37 (4):328-352.
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  12. Peter Boghossian (2006). Behaviorism, Constructivism, and Socratic Pedagogy. Educational Philosophy and Theory 38 (6):713–722.
    This paper examines the relationship among behaviorism, constructivism and Socratic pedagogy. Specifically, it asks if a Socratic educator can be a constructivist or a behaviorist. In the first part of the paper, each learning theory, as it relates to the Socratic project, is explained. In the last section, the question of whether or not a Socratic teacher can subscribe to a constructivist or a behaviorist learning theory is addressed. The paper concludes by stating that while Socratic pedagogy shares some similarities (...)
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  13. Stefano Borgo, Noemi Spagnoletti, Laure Vieu & Elisabetta Visalberghi (2013). Artifact and Artifact Categorization: Comparing Humans and Capuchin Monkeys. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):375-389.
    We aim to show that far-related primates like humans and the capuchin monkeys show interesting correspondences in terms of artifact characterization and categorization. We investigate this issue by using a philosophically-inspired definition of physical artifact which, developed for human artifacts, turns out to be applicable for cross-species comparison. In this approach an artifact is created when an entity is intentionally selected and some capacities attributed to it (often characterizing a purpose). Behavioral studies suggest that this notion of artifact is not (...)
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  14. Paul J. Bruckner (1932). Behaviorism and Common Sense. Modern Schoolman 9 (4):80-82.
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  15. Alex Byrne (1994). Behaviorism. In Samuel Guttenplan (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.
    Introductory texts in the philosophy of mind often begin with a discussion of behaviourism, presented as one of the few theories of mind that have been conclusively refuted. But matters are not that simple: behaviourism, in one form or another, is still alive and kicking.
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  16. Randall K. Campbell (1991). Nonnomic Properties of Stimuli and Psychological Explanation. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (1):77 - 92.
    Recently there has been a great deal of argument about what justifies references to representational states in explanations of behavior. I discuss Jerry Fodor's claim that it is necessary to ascribe representational states to organisms that respond to "nonnomic properties" of stimuli. Zenon Pylyshyn's (apparently equivalent) claim that it is necessary to ascribe representational states to organisms that respond to "nonprojectable properties" of stimuli and Fodor's claim that an organism's ability to respond to nonnomic properties of stimuli is a criterion (...)
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  17. Cristiano Castelfranchi (2014). Minds as Social Institutions. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):121-143.
    I will first discuss how social interactions organize, coordinate, and specialize as “artifacts,” tools; how these tools are not only for coordination but for achieving something, for some outcome (goal/function), for a collective work. In particular, I will argue that these artifacts specify (predict and prescribe) the mental contents of the participants, both in terms of beliefs and acceptances and in terms of motives and plans. We have to revise the behavioristic view of “scripts” and “roles”; when we play a (...)
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  18. Charles Henry Chase (1927). Trundle-Bed Philosophy; Being a Critique Upon the Modern Cafeteria Method of Education and Pseudo-Scientific Behaviorism. East Lansing, Mich.,The Author.
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  19. M. C. Chernoff, B. J. Baars, A. Bandura, V. M. Bekhterev, J. Bentham, A. Berger, G. Bergmann, A. Biglan, H. Bischof & A. H. Black (1999). Cavalli-Sforza, LL, 36, 16 Cezanne, Xii Chase, PN, Xv Chen, 16, 36. In Bruce A. Thyer (ed.), The Philosophical Legacy of Behaviorism. Kluwer Academic Publishers.
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  20. N. H. Colburn (1954). Logic and Professor Ryle. Philosophy of Science 21 (2):132-139.
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  21. S. Coleman (1987). Behaviorism and Logical Positivism. A Reassessment of the Alliance. [REVIEW] Journal of Mind and Behavior 8 (1).
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  22. Arthur W. Collins (1999). Behaviorism and Belief. Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 96 (1-3):75-88.
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  23. Alan Costall (1980). The Limits of Language: Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy and Skinner's Radical Behaviorism. Behaviorism 8 (2):123-131.
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  24. Robert F. Creegan (1948). Laying the Ghost of Behaviorism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 29 (1):43.
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  25. Richard E. Creel (1974). Radical Behaviorism, Feelings, and Beliefs. Behaviorism 2 (2):190-193.
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  26. William Davis (1978). Behaviorism as a Test Case. Journal of Social Philosophy 9 (1):1-5.
  27. Frank Diehl (1934). An Historical and Critical Study of Radical Behaviorism as a Philosophical Doctrine. Baltimore.
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  28. William H. Dray (1954). Professor Ryle on Arguments and Inference Licenses. Mind 63 (251):384-387.
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  29. Louis Dupré (1967). Behaviorism and Phenomenology, Contrasting Bases for Modern Psychology. New Scholasticism 41 (3):418-421.
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  30. Charles A. Ellwood (forthcoming). The Uses and Limitations of Behaviorism in the Social Sciences. Behaviorism. A Battle Line, Ed., Wp King (Nashville, Tennessee: Cokesbury Press, 1930).
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  31. George Englebretsen (1974). Behaviorism and Perception. Man and World 7 (2):149-157.
  32. Owen J. Flanagan (1980). Skinnerian Metaphysics and the Problem of Operationism. Behaviorism 8 (1):1-13.
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  33. Jerry A. Fodor (2006). Logical Behaviorism [Selection From Language of Thought]. In Maureen Eckert (ed.), Theories of Mind: An Introductory Reader. Rowman and Littlefield. 27.
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  34. Dagfinn Follesdal (2011). Developments in Quine's Behaviorism. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (3):273-282.
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  35. Dagfinn Follesdal (1982). Intentionality and Behaviorism. In Logic, Methodology & Philosophy Of Science. Amsterdam: North-Holland.
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  36. Gordon R. Foxall (2008). Intentional Behaviorism Revisited. Behavior and Philosophy 36:113 - 155.
    The central fact in the delineation of radical behaviorism is its conceptual avoidance of propositional content. This eschewal of the intentional stance sets it apart not only from cognitivism but from other non-behaviorisms. Indeed, the defining characteristic of radical behaviorism is not that it avoids mediating processes per se but that it sets out to account for behavior without recourse to propositional attitudes. Based, rather, on the contextual stance, it provides definitions of contingency-shaped, rule-governed verbal and private behaviors which are (...)
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  37. Gordon R. Foxall (2007). Intentional Behaviorism. Behavior and Philosophy 35:1 - 55.
    Two of the leading contenders to explain behavior are radical behaviorism and intentionality: an account that seeks to confine itself to descriptions of response–environment correlations and one that employs the language of beliefs and desires to explicate its subject matter. While each claims an exclusive right to undertake this task, this paper argues that neither can be eliminated from a complete explanatory account of human behavior. The behavior analysis derived from radical behaviorism is generally sufficient for the prediction and control (...)
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  38. Gordon R. Foxall & Jorge M. Oliveira-Castro (2009). Intentional Consequences of Self-Instruction. Behavior and Philosophy 37:87 - 104.
    Discrepancies between animal and human responding on standard schedules of reinforcement have been explained by reference to the human capacity for language and consequent formulation of self-instructions. As a result, schedule responding has been causally attributed to private events. However, the operations that individuals are assumed to carry out in the formulation of self-instructions cannot be described other than intentionally and this raises important issues of explanation for an extensional behavioral science. It is argued that radical behaviorism is ultimately dependent (...)
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  39. M. Garrido (1979). Brian D. Mackenzie," Behaviorism and the Limits of Scientific Method". Teorema: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 9 (2):221-222.
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  40. Joseph Germana (1980). Wittgenstein Zen. Behaviorism 8:149-150.
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  41. Joseph Germana (1977). Wittgenstein/WITTGENSTEIN. Behaviorism 5 (1):61-62.
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  42. Roger F. Gibson (1996). Quine's Behaviorism. In William T. O'Donohue & Richard F. Kitchener (eds.), The Philosophy of Psychology. Sage Publications. 96--107.
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  43. Nicholas F. Gier (1982). Wittgenstein, Intentionality, and Behaviorism. Metaphilosophy 13 (1):46–64.
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  44. Amedeo Giorgi (1975). Convergences and Divergences Between Phenomenological Psychology and Behaviorism: A Beginning Dialogue. Behaviorism 3 (2):200-212.
    Convergences between phenomenological psychology (PP) and behaviorism include opposition to dualism between the physical world and mental representations, and between a real visible man and an "inner" man with conscious states of which he alone is aware. Additionally, both views favor cautious use of theories, especially those which utilize hypothetico-deductive methodology, and a careful, descriptive, rather than inferential approach to behavior. Behaviorism and PP also share opposition to physiological reductionism. The 2 viewpoints diverge regarding their understanding of science. PP is (...)
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  45. John D. Glenn Jr (1985). The Behaviorism of a Phenomenologist: The Structure of Behavior and the Concept of Mind. Philosophical Topics 13 (2):247-256.
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  46. Israel Goldiamond (1976). Protection of Human Subjects and Patients: A Social Contingency Analysis of Distinctions Between Research and Practice, and Its Implications. Behaviorism 4 (1):1-41.
    Uses a social contingency analysis derived from behavioral psychology to compare research and practice. The components of a contingency (occasion, behavior, and consequence) present in a variety of research, treatment, and educational situations are discussed. Subjective terms such as intent, coercion, and consent are analyzed by means of a behavioral approach. Implications include the possible value of a collegial, symmetrical relationship between the professional and the individual in both research and practice domains. Such a relationship is consistent with current dissatisfaction (...)
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  47. Israel Goldiamond (1976). Your Use of the JSTOR Archive Indicates Your Acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, Available At. Behaviorism 4 (1):1-41.
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  48. Israel Goldiamond (1975). Alternative Sets as a Framework for Behavioral Formulations and Research. Behaviorism 3 (1):49-86.
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  49. Israel Goldiamond (1973). Toward a Constructional Approach to Social Problems: Ethical and Constitutional Issues Raised by Applied Behavior Analysis. Behaviorism 2 (1):1-84.
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  50. I. Gormezano & S. R. Coleman (1985). An Essay Review of Mechanisms of Adaptive Behavior: Clark L. Hull's Theoretical Papers, with Commentary, Edited by A. Amsel and M. E. Rashotte. Columbia University Press: New York. 1984. Behaviorism 13 (2):171-182.
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