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  1. Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.) (2005). Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon.
    This volume will be the starting point for future discussion and research.
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  2. Stefano Borgo, Noemi Spagnoletti, Laure Vieu & Elisabetta Visalberghi (2013). Artifact and Artifact Categorization: Comparing Humans and Capuchin Monkeys. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):375-389.
    We aim to show that far-related primates like humans and the capuchin monkeys show interesting correspondences in terms of artifact characterization and categorization. We investigate this issue by using a philosophically-inspired definition of physical artifact which, developed for human artifacts, turns out to be applicable for cross-species comparison. In this approach an artifact is created when an entity is intentionally selected and some capacities attributed to it (often characterizing a purpose). Behavioral studies suggest that this notion of artifact is not (...)
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  3. Alex Byrne (1994). Behaviorism. In Samuel Guttenplan (ed.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Mind. Blackwell.
    Introductory texts in the philosophy of mind often begin with a discussion of behaviourism, presented as one of the few theories of mind that have been conclusively refuted. But matters are not that simple: behaviourism, in one form or another, is still alive and kicking.
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  4. Randall K. Campbell (1991). Nonnomic Properties of Stimuli and Psychological Explanation. Behavior and Philosophy 19 (1):77 - 92.
    Recently there has been a great deal of argument about what justifies references to representational states in explanations of behavior. I discuss Jerry Fodor's claim that it is necessary to ascribe representational states to organisms that respond to "nonnomic properties" of stimuli. Zenon Pylyshyn's (apparently equivalent) claim that it is necessary to ascribe representational states to organisms that respond to "nonprojectable properties" of stimuli and Fodor's claim that an organism's ability to respond to nonnomic properties of stimuli is a criterion (...)
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  5. Cristiano Castelfranchi (2014). Minds as Social Institutions. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (1):121-143.
    I will first discuss how social interactions organize, coordinate, and specialize as “artifacts,” tools; how these tools are not only for coordination but for achieving something, for some outcome (goal/function), for a collective work. In particular, I will argue that these artifacts specify (predict and prescribe) the mental contents of the participants, both in terms of beliefs and acceptances and in terms of motives and plans. We have to revise the behavioristic view of “scripts” and “roles”; when we play a (...)
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  6. Alan Costall (1980). The Limits of Language: Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy and Skinner's Radical Behaviorism. Behaviorism 8 (2):123-131.
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  7. Richard E. Creel (forthcoming). Radical Behaviorism, Feelings, and Beliefs. Behaviorism.
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  8. George Englebretsen (1974). Behaviorism and Perception. Man and World 7 (2):149-157.
  9. Owen J. Flanagan (forthcoming). Skinnerian Metaphysics and the Problem of Operationism. Behaviorism.
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  10. Joseph Germana (1980). Wittgenstein Zen. Behaviorism 8:149-150.
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  11. Joseph Germana (1977). Wittgenstein/WITTGENSTEIN. Behaviorism 5 (1):61-62.
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  12. Amedeo Giorgi (forthcoming). Convergences and Divergences Between Phenomenological Psychology and Behaviorism: A Beginning Dialogue. Behaviorism.
    Convergences between phenomenological psychology (PP) and behaviorism include opposition to dualism between the physical world and mental representations, and between a real visible man and an "inner" man with conscious states of which he alone is aware. Additionally, both views favor cautious use of theories, especially those which utilize hypothetico-deductive methodology, and a careful, descriptive, rather than inferential approach to behavior. Behaviorism and PP also share opposition to physiological reductionism. The 2 viewpoints diverge regarding their understanding of science. PP is (...)
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  13. Israel Goldiamond (forthcoming). Protection of Human Subjects and Patients: A Social Contingency Analysis of Distinctions Between Research and Practice, and its Implications. Behaviorism.
    Uses a social contingency analysis derived from behavioral psychology to compare research and practice. The components of a contingency (occasion, behavior, and consequence) present in a variety of research, treatment, and educational situations are discussed. Subjective terms such as intent, coercion, and consent are analyzed by means of a behavioral approach. Implications include the possible value of a collegial, symmetrical relationship between the professional and the individual in both research and practice domains. Such a relationship is consistent with current dissatisfaction (...)
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  14. Israel Goldiamond (1976). Your Use of the JSTOR Archive Indicates Your Acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, Available At. Behaviorism 4 (1):1-41.
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  15. Israel Goldiamond (1975). Alternative Sets as a Framework for Behavioral Formulations and Research. Behaviorism 3 (1):49-86.
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  16. Israel Goldiamond (1973). Toward a Constructional Approach to Social Problems: Ethical and Constitutional Issues Raised by Applied Behavior Analysis. Behaviorism 2 (1):1-84.
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  17. I. Gormezano & S. R. Coleman (1985). An Essay Review of Mechanisms of Adaptive Behavior: Clark L. Hull's Theoretical Papers, with Commentary, Edited by A. Amsel and M. E. Rashotte. Columbia University Press: New York. 1984. Behaviorism 13 (2):171-182.
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  18. George Graham (forthcoming). More on the Goodness of Skinner. Behaviorism.
    Discusses B. F. Skinner's proposal in Beyond Freedom and Dignity that reinforcing stimuli are important in the production and modification of value talk. The argument that the view that values are reinforcing leads to moral nihilism is discussed. It is concluded that moral standards can be objective without being universally deployable, and that Skinnerian morality is objective. It shows that certain actions are morally appropriate, others morally wrong. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).
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  19. George Graham (1982). Spartans and Behaviorists. Behaviorism 10 (2):137-149.
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  20. George Graham (1977). On What is Good: A Study of BF Skinner's Operant Behaviorist View. Behaviorism 5 (2):97-112.
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  21. George Graham & Peter Killeen (1985). Behaviorism: The Next Generation. Behaviorism 13 (1):1-2.
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  22. Samuel D. Guttenplan (ed.) (1994). A Companion to the Philosophy of Mind. Cambridge: Blackwell.
  23. Forest Hansen (1979). A Critique of the Epistemological Skepticism of Campbell's Phenomenological Behavorist Psychology. Behaviorism 7 (2):65-84.
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  24. Steven C. Hayes (1984). Making Sense of Spirituality. Behaviorism 12 (2):99-110.
    In ordinary language a clear distinction is made between the world of matter and that of spirit. While dualism is typically thought to be incompatible with behaviorism, a behavioral analysis of self-awareness suggests that there are good reasons for dualistic talk. Reputed qualities of both the spiritual aspect of humans and of a metaphysical God seem to flow naturally from the analysis. The use of the spiritual facet of self in therapy is briefly discussed.
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  25. Steven C. Hayes & Aaron J. Brownstein (1985). Mentalism and the" as-yet Unexplained": A Reply to Killeen. Behaviorism 13 (2):151-154.
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  26. Steven C. Hayes & Roger F. Maley (forthcoming). Coercion: Legal and Behavioral Issues. Behaviorism.
    Defines coercion in behavioral terms and distinguishes between coercive and noncoercive control. While the legal definition of coercion uses mentalistic and circular language, emphasizing absence of free, voluntary action, the behavioral definition specifies the conditions under which the term is used and the function it serves. Control is labeled coercive when the controlling contingencies are salient, i.e., when they elicit behavior discordant with the individual's reinforcement history. Coercion is frequently characterized by aversive control. Positive reinforcement can be coercive if it (...)
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  27. Steven C. Hayes & Roger F. Maley (1977). Your Use of the JSTOR Archive Indicates Your Acceptance of the Terms & Conditions of Use, Available At. Behaviorism 5 (2):87-95.
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  28. Philip N. Hineline (1980). The Language of Behavior Analysis: Its Community, its Functions, and its Limitations. Behaviorism 8 (1):67-86.
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  29. Max Hocutt (1985). The Truth in Behaviorism: A Review of Ge Zuriff, Behaviorism: A Conceptual Reconstr Uction. [REVIEW] Behaviorism 13.
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  30. Richard T. Hull (1974). Psycho-Physical Correlations and Ontology: A Reply to Shaffer. Behaviorism 2 (2):194-199.
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  31. Lisa M. Johnson & Edward K. Morris (1987). When Speaking of Probability in Behavior Analysis. Behaviorism 15 (2):107-129.
    Probability is not an unambiguous concept within the sciences or in vernacular language, yet it is fundamental to much of behavior analysis. The present paper examines some problems this ambiguity creates in general,as well as within the experimental analysis of behavior, in particular. As background material, we first introduce the three most common theories of probability in mathematics and science, discussing their advantages and disadvantages, and their relevance to behavior analysis. Next, we discuss the concept of probability as encountered in (...)
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  32. Peter R. Killeen (1984). Emergent Behaviorism. Behaviorism 12 (2):25-39.
    In this article I examine Skinner's objections to mentalism. I conclude that his only valid objections concern the "specious explanations" that mentalism might afford ? explanations that are incomplete, circular, or faulty in other ways. Unfortunately, the mere adoption of behavioristic terminology does not solve that problem. It camouflages the nature of "private events," while providing no protection from specious explanations. I argue that covert states and events are causally effective, and may be sufficiently different in their nature to deserve (...)
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  33. Richard F. Kitchener (1977). Behavior and Behaviorism. Behaviorism 5 (2):11-71.
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  34. Terry J. Knapp (forthcoming). An Index to BF Skinner's" Walden Two&Quot;. Behaviorism.
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  35. Terry J. Knapp (1980). Beyond Verbal Behavior. Behaviorism 2:187-194.
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  36. Hugh Lacey & Barry Schwartz (1986). Behaviorism, Intentionality and Socio-Historical Structure. Behaviorism 14 (2):193-210.
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  37. P. A. Lamal (1986). A Response to a Call to Cognition. Behaviorism 13:147-149.
    The view of Deitz and Arrington (1984) that Wittgenstein's ordinary language philosophy allows behaviorism to use cognitive terms with a behavioristic system is disputed and an alternative is suggested.
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  38. P. A. Lamal (1984). Getting It Right: A Reply to Woolfolk. Behaviorism 12 (2):97-98.
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  39. P. A. Lamal (1983). A Cogent Critique of Epistemology Leaves Radical Behaviorism Unscathed. Behaviorism 11 (1):103-109.
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  40. Klaus Landwehr (1983). On Taking Skinner on His Own Terms: Comments on Wessells' Critique of Skinner's View of Cognitive Theories. Behaviorism 11 (2):187-191.
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  41. Vicki L. Lee (forthcoming). Behavior as a Constituent of Conduct. Behaviorism.
    osits that behavior is a constituent of the phenomena that count as psychological and discusses current debate on this topic in the psychological community—especially among radical behaviorists. Topics covered include the subject-matter debate, a foundation of ordinary thought, a classification of conduct, actions, means and ends, positive and negative actions, analysis and synthesis of actions, content and frame, behavior and conduct, body and mind, conduct and operant behavior, ambiguity of behavior, and radical behaviorism and cognitivism. Psychologists do not agree on (...)
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  42. Vicki L. Lee (1987). The Structure of Conduct. Behaviorism 15 (2):141-148.
    ABSTRACT: This paper presents an argument about the location of psychological structure. It argues that psychological structure can be found in the domain of acts. The paper begins by arguing that all natural domains have concrete and abstract tiers. The concrete tier consists of concrete particulars that exist in time and space, and the abstract tier consists of classes, elements and relations that underlie the concrete tier. Having described the general nature of natural domains, the paper argues that acts are (...)
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  43. Vicki L. Lee (1984). Some Notes on the Subject Matter of Skinner's Verbal Behavior. Behaviorism 12 (1):29-40.
    This paper offers some comments about the subject matter of Skinner's book Verbal Behavior (1957). It first presents an argument against the common misconception that Verbal Behavior is about language. It then discusses the nature of verbal behavior as a subdivision of op?rant .behavior. Following that, the paper identifies three aspects of the concept of verbal behavior that need some clarification. Finally, the paper concludes by pointing out that the significance of Verbal Behavior lies most centrally in its effort to (...)
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  44. Vicki L. Lee (1981). Terminological and Conceptual Revision in the Experimental Analysis of Language Development: Why. Behaviorism 9 (1):25-53.
    This paper recommends that experimental analysts of language development abandon for the purposes of experimental inquiry both the term "language" and the concept it designates. In support of this recommendation, the paper dis cusses the multiple meanings of "language," the proposal that "language" refers to behavior, the implicit acceptance by behavior analysts of psycholinguistic thought despite their ostensible rejection of it, and the nature of language as a subject matter. In addition, the nature of common-sense psychology, the domain of behavior (...)
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  45. David Liggins (2005). Truthmakers and Explanation. In Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.), Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon. 105--115.
    Truthmaker theory promises to do some useful philosophical work: equipping us to argue against phenomenalism and Rylean behaviourism, for instance, and helping us decide what exists (Lewis 1999, 207; Armstrong 1997, 113-119). But it has proved hard to formulate a truthmaker theory that is both useful and believable. I want to suggest that a neglected approach to truthmakers – that of Ian McFetridge – can surmount some of the problems that make other theories of truthmaking unattractive. To begin with, I’ll (...)
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  46. A. W. Logue (1978). Behaviorist John B. Watson and the Continuity of the Species. Behaviorism 6 (1):71-81.
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  47. John C. Malone (forthcoming). William James and BF Skinner: Behaviorism, Reinforcement, and Interest. Behaviorism.
    Discusses similarities and differences between James and Skinner and criticizes Skinner for failing to provide an adequate description of complex behaviors. Similarities include opposition to a dualistic approach in which mind and body are seen as qualitatively different, and to the notion that mental phenomena are causal entities. In addition, there is agreement that mental events are actions and not copies of external reality. Skinner is criticized for providing an over-simplified account of complex phenomena and translating such a description to (...)
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  48. Brenda Munsey Mapel (1977). Philosophical Criticism of Behaviorism: An Analysis. Behaviorism 5 (1):17-32.
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  49. Michael Martin (forthcoming). Interpreting Skinner. Behaviorism.
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  50. J. J. McDowell (1986). AN UNSUCCESSFUL DEFENSE OF AN AUTONOMOUS MAN: A Review of Behaviorism, Science, and Human Nature, by Barry Schwartz and Hugh Lacey. Norton: New York. 1982. Behaviorism 14 (1):41-44.
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