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Subcategories:See also:History/traditions: Belief
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  1. Robert John Ackermann (1972). Belief and Knowledge. Garden City, N.Y.,Anchor Books.
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  2. Sarah Adams (2006). Be Cool to the Pizza Dude. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  3. Phyllis Allen (2006). Leaving Identity Issues to Other Folks. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  4. Isabel Allende (2006). In Giving I Connect with Others. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  5. Jay Allison (2006). Introduction. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  6. Jay Allison & Dan Gediman (eds.) (2008). This I Believe Ii: More Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. Henry Holt.
    A new collection of inspiring personal philosophies from another noteworthy group of people This second collection of This I Believe essays gathers seventyfive essayists—ranging from famous to previously unknown—completing the thought that begins the book’s title. With contributors who run the gamut from cellist Yo-Yo Ma to ordinary folks like a diner waitress, an Iraq War veteran, a farmer, a new husband, and many others, This I Believe II , like the first New York Times bestselling collection, showcases moving and (...)
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  7. Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.) (2006). This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
    An inspiring collection of the personal philosophies of a fascinating group of individuals Based on the NPR series of the same name, This I Believe features eighty essays penned by the famous and the unknown—completing the thought that the book’s title begins. Each piece compels readers to rethink not only how they have arrived at their own personal beliefs but also the extent to which they share them with others. Featuring a star-studded list of contributors—including Isabel Allende, John Updike, William (...)
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  8. A. H. Almaas (1986). The Void: A Psychodynamic Investigation of the Relationship Between Mind and Space. Almaas Publications.
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  9. Brad Armendt, Pragmatic Interests and the Strength of Belief.
    Does the strength with which we hold a particular belief depend upon the significance we attach to it? Might we move from one context to another, remaining in the same doxastic state concerning p, yet holding a stronger belief that p in one context than we do in the other? In order for that to happen, a doxastic state, a belief state, must have a certain sort of complexity, a context-sensitivity that yields, in the presence of one set of stakes, (...)
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  10. Robert Audi (1972). The Concept of 'Believing'. Personalist 53:43-52.
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  11. Britta Baas & Bettina Röder (eds.) (2008). Der Himmel in Uns: Reisen Durchs Leben: 13 Gespräche. Publik-Forum.
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  12. Ibn Badr & ʻAbduh ʻAbd Allāh (2005). .
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  13. Lynne Rudder Baker (2003). Belief Ascription and the Illusion of Depth. Facta Philosophica 5 (2):183-201.
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  14. Lynne Rudder Baker (2001). Are Beliefs Brain States? In Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.), Explaining Beliefs. CSLI Publications (Stanford).
    During the past couple of decades, philosophy of mind--with its siblings, philosophy of psychology and cognitive science--has been one of the most exciting areas of philosophy. Yet, in that time, I have come to think that there is a deep flaw in the basic conception of its object of study--a deep flaw in its conception of the so-called propositional attitudes, like belief, desire, and intention. Taking belief as the fundamental propositional attitude, scientifically-minded philosophers hold that beliefs, if there are any, (...)
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  15. Lynne Rudder Baker (2001). Practical Realism Defended: Replies to Critics. In Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.), Explaining Beliefs. CSLI Publications (Stanford).
    The topics that I shall consider are these: (1) Causal Explanatoriness of the Attitudes (Dretske, Elugardo); (2) The “Brain-Explain” Thesis and Metaphysical Constraints on Explanation (Antony, Elugardo); (3) Causal Powers of Beliefs (Meyering); (4) Microreduction (Beckermann); (5) Non-Emergent, Non-Reductive Materialism (Antony); (6) The Master Argument Against the Standard View (Dretske, Antony, Elugardo); (7) Practical Realism Extended (Meijers); (8) Alternative to Both the Standard View and Practical Realism (Newen).
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  16. Lynne Rudder Baker (1994). Reply to Van Gulick. Philosophical Studies 76 (2-3):217-221.
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  17. Lynne Rudder Baker (1993). What Beliefs Are Not. In Steven J. Wagner & Richard Warner (eds.), Naturalism: A Critical Appraisal. University of Notre Dame Press (Notre Dame).
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  18. Lynne Rudder Baker (1987). Saving Belief. Princeton University Press.
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  19. Elvia Bautista (2006). Remembering All the Boys. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  20. A. Beckerman (2001). The Real Reason for the Standard View. In Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.), Explaining Beliefs. Csli.
    According to Lynne Baker, there are three main arguments for the.
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  21. Leonard Bernstein (2006). The Mountain Disappears. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  22. Anne Bezuidenhout (1996). Cohen, L. Jonathan. An Essay on Belief and Acceptance. Review of Metaphysics 50 (2):392-395.
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  23. R. Bogdan (ed.) (1986). Belief: Form, Content, and Function. Oxford University Press.
    Some of the topics presented in this volume of original essays on contemporary approaches to belief include the problem of misrepresentation and false belief, conscious versus unconscious belief, explicit versus tacit belief, and the durable versus ephemeral question of the nature of belief. The contributors, Fred Dretske, Keith Lehrer, William Lycan, Stephen Schiffer, Stephen P. Stich, and the editor, Radu Bogdan, focus on the mental realization of belief, its cognitive and behavioral aspects, and the semantic aspects of its content. This (...)
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  24. Radu J. Bogdan (1986). The Manufacture of Belief. In R. Bogdan (ed.), Belief: Form, Content, and Function. Oxford University Press.
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  25. James T. Borhek (1983). A Sociology of Belief. R.E. Krieger Pub. Co..
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  26. Aryeh Botwinick (1997). Skepticism, Belief, and the Modern: Maimonides to Nietzsche. Cornell University Press.
  27. Luc Bovens (1999). Do Beliefs Supervene on Degrees of Confidence? In Anthonie W. M. Meijers (ed.), Belief, Cognition, and the Will. Tilburg University Press. 6--27.
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  28. João Maurício Barreiros Brás (2010). A Importância de Desconfiar. Nova Vega.
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  29. Manuel Bremer (2012). How Are Metarepresentations Built and Processed. Kriterion 26 (1):22-38.
  30. Manuel Bremer (2008). Do Cats Have Beliefs? In Stephen Hales (ed.), What Philosophy Teaches You about Your Cat.
    In our dealings with our pets, and larger animals in general, at least most of us see them as conscious beings. We say “the cat feels pain” ascribing sensation. We notice “My cat wants to get in the kitchen because she thinks there is some cheese left” ascribing beliefs and desires. Explanations likes these can be employed on a variety of occasions, and usually we are content with what they say. We seem to understand why our cat is doing what (...)
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  31. Daniel Breyer (2010). Reflective Luck and Belief Ownership. Acta Analytica 25 (2):133-154.
    A belief is reflectively lucky if it is a matter of luck that the belief is true, given what a subject is aware of on reflection alone. Various epistemologists have argued that any adequate theory of knowledge should eliminate reflective luck, but doing so has proven difficult. This article distinguishes between two kinds of reflective luck arguments in the literature: local arguments and global arguments. It argues that local arguments are best interpreted as demanding, not that one be reflectively aware (...)
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  32. Daniel Breyer & John Greco (2008). Cognitive Integration and the Ownership of Belief: Response to Bernecker. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):173–184.
    This paper responds to Sven Bernecker’s argument that agent reliabilism cannot accommodate internalist intuitions about clarvoyance cases. In section 1 we clarify a version of agent reliabilism and Bernecker’s objections against it. In section 2 we say more about how the notion of cognitive integration helps to adjudicate clairvoyance cases and other proposed counterexamples to reliabilism. The central idea is that cognitive integration underwrites a kind of belief ownership, which in turn underwrites the sort of responsibility for belief required for (...)
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  33. William F. Buckley Jr (2006). How is It Possible to Believe in God? In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  34. Niven Busch (2006). The Fellowship of the World. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  35. Rocco Caporale & Antonio Grumelli (eds.) (1971). The Culture of Unbelief. Berkeley,University of California Press.
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  36. L. S. Carrier (2011). The Essential Tie Between Knowing and Believing: A Causal Account of Knowledge and Epistemic Reasons. Edwin Mellen Press.
    This book offers a causal-explanatory account of knowledge as true belief caused by the worldly state of affairs that explains its existence. It also defends a contextual account of epistemic reasons, arguing that both foundationalism and coherentism cannot provide a satisfactory account of such reasons. Skeptical arguments are answered against a historical background from Plato to the present day.
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  37. Benjamin Carson (2006). There is No Job More Important Than Parenting. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  38. Greg Chapman (2006). A Journey Toward Acceptance and Love. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  39. Warren Christopher (2006). A Shared Moment of Trust. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  40. A. Clark & Peter Millican (eds.) (1996). Connectionism, Concepts, and Folk Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    This is the second of two volumes of essays in commemoration of Alan Turing; it celebrates his intellectual legacy within the philosophy of mind and cognitive science. A distinguished international cast of contributors focus on the relationship beteen a scientific, computational image of the mind and a common-sense picture of the mind as an inner arena populated by concepts, beliefs, intentions, and qualia. Topics covered include the causal potency of folk- psychological states, the connectionist reconception of learning and concept formation, (...)
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  41. L. Jonathan Cohen (1996). Does Belief Exist? In A. Clark & Peter Millican (eds.), Connectionism, Concepts, and Folk Psychology. Oxford University Press. 2--265.
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  42. Arthur W. Collins (1979). Could Our Beliefs Be Representations in Our Brains? Journal of Philosophy 76 (May):225-243.
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  43. Philip E. Converse (2006). The Nature of Belief Systems in Mass Publics (1964). Critical Review 18 (1-3):1-74.
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  44. Mary Cook (2006). The Hardest Work You Will Ever Do. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  45. Norman Corwin (2006). Good Can Be as Communicable as Evil. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  46. Susan Cosio (2006). A Daily Walk Just to Listen. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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  47. John Cottingham (2009). Why Believe? Continuum.
    Belief and its benefits -- Belief, reason, goodness -- Belief and the unknown -- Obstacles to belief -- Belief and meaning -- Learning to believe -- Believing and living.
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  48. Eleonora Cresto (2010). Belief and Contextual Acceptance. Synthese 177 (1):41-66.
    I develop a strategy for representing epistemic states and epistemic changes that seeks to be sensitive to the difference between voluntary and involuntary aspects of our epistemic life, as well as to the role of pragmatic factors in epistemology. The model relies on a particular understanding of the distinction between full belief and acceptance , which makes room for the idea that our reasoning on both practical and theoretical matters typically proceeds in a contextual way. Within this framework, I discuss (...)
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  49. Martin Cyril D'Arcy (1976/1971). The Nature of Belief. Greenwood Press.
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  50. Kathy Dahlen (2006). The Elusive yet Holy Core. In Jay Allison, Dan Gediman, John Gregory & Viki Merrick (eds.), This I Believe: The Personal Philosophies of Remarkable Men and Women. H. Holt.
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