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  1. R. I. Aaron (1931). Locke and Berkeley's Commonplace Book. Mind 40 (160):439-459.
  2. Fred Ablondi (2012). Hutcheson, Perception, and the Sceptic's Challenge. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):269-281.
    Francis Hutcheson's theory of perception, as put forth in his Synopsis of Metaphysics, bears a striking similarity to that of John Locke. In particular, Hutcheson and Locke both have at the centre of their theories the notion of ideas as representational entities acting as the direct objects of all of our perceptions. On first consideration, one might find this similarity wholly unremarkable, given the popularity of Locke's Essay. But the Essay was published in 1689 and the Synopsis in 1742, and (...)
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  3. Alexander Aichele (2012). I Think Something That You Do Not Think, and That is Red. John Locke and George Berkeley Over Abstract Ideas and Kant's Logical Abstractionism. Kant-Studien 103 (1).
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  4. Timo Airaksinen & Bertil Belfrage (eds.) (2011). Berkeley's Lasting Legacy: 300 Years Later. Cambridge Scholars Pub..
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  5. Henry E. Allison (1973). Kant's Critique of Berkeley. Journal of the History of Philosophy 11 (1):43.
  6. Margaret Atherton (1996). Lady Mary Shepherd's Case Against George Berkeley. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 4 (2):347 – 366.
  7. Margaret Atherton (1991). Corpuscles, Mechanism, and Essentialism in Berkeley and Locke. Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (1):47-67.
  8. M. R. Ayers (1982). Berkeley's Immaterialism and Kant's Transcendental Idealism. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 13:51-69.
    Ever since its first publication critics of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason have been struck by certain strong formal resemblances between transcendental idealism and Berkeley's immaterialism. Both philosophers hold that the sensible world is mind-dependent, and that from this very mind-dependence we can draw a refutation of scepticism of the senses.
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  9. Teppei Baba (2008). Is Berkeley's Theory of Ideas A Variant of Locke's? Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 16:9-15.
    I try to show that Berkeley's theory of ideas is not a variant of Locke's. We can find such an interpretation of Berkeley in Thomas Reid. So, we could call this interpretation a 'traditional interpretation'. This traditional interpretation has an influence still now, for example, Tomida interprets Berkeley in this line (Tomida2002). We will see that this traditional interpretation gives a serious problem to Berkeley (section 1). And I am going to present an argument against this traditional interpretation (section 2).
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  10. A. Z. Bar-on (1983). Husserl's Berkeley. Analecta Husserliana 16:353.
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  11. Winston H. F. Barnes (1940). Did Berkeley Misunderstand Locke? Mind 49 (193):52-57.
  12. D. Baumgardt (1933). Joseph, H. W. B., A Comparison of Kants Idealism with that of Berkeley. [REVIEW] Société Française de Philosophie, Bulletin 38:441.
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  13. Jonathan Bennett (2003). Learning From Six Philosophers: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Volume 2. Clarendon Press (Paperback).
    Jonathan Bennett engages with the thought of six great thinkers of the early modern period: Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume. While not neglecting the historical setting of each, his chief focus is on the words they wrote. What problem is being tackled? How exactly is the solution meant to work? Does it succeed? If not, why not? What can we learn from its success or its failure? These questions reflect Bennett's dedication to engaging with philosophy as philosophy, not as (...)
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  14. Hans Peter Benschop (1997). Berkeley, Lee and Abstract Ideas. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (1):55 – 66.
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  15. David Berman (ed.) (2015). George Berkeley : Eighteenth-Century Responses: Volume Ii. Routledge.
    The material reprinted in this two-volume set, first published in 1989, covers the first eighty-five years in responses to George Berkeley’s writings. David Berman identifies several key waves of eighteenth-century criticism surrounding Berkeley’s philosophies, ranging from hostile and discounted, to valued and defended. The first volume includes an account of the life of Berkeley by J. Murray and key responses from 1711 to 1748, whilst the second volume covers the years between 1745 and 1796. This fascinating reissue illustrates the breadth (...)
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  16. David Berman (ed.) (2014). George Berkeley : Eighteenth-Century Responses: Volume I. Routledge.
    The material reprinted in this two-volume set, first published in 1989, covers the first eighty-five years in responses to George Berkeley’s writings. David Berman identifies several key waves of eighteenth-century criticism surrounding Berkeley’s philosophies, ranging from hostile and discounted, to valued and defended. The first volume includes an account of the life of Berkeley by J. Murray and key responses from 1711 to 1748, whilst the second volume covers the years between 1745 and 1796. This fascinating reissue illustrates the breadth (...)
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  17. David Berman (ed.) (2014). George Berkeley (Routledge Revivals): Eighteenth-Century Responses: Volume I. Routledge.
    The material reprinted in this two-volume set, first published in 1989, covers the first eighty-five years in responses to George Berkeley’s writings. David Berman identifies several key waves of eighteenth-century criticism surrounding Berkeley’s philosophies, ranging from hostile and discounted, to valued and defended. The first volume includes an account of the life of Berkeley by J. Murray and key responses from 1711 to 1748, whilst the second volume covers the years between 1745 and 1796. This fascinating reissue illustrates the breadth (...)
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  18. David Berman (2005). Berkeley and Irish Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum.
    George Berkeley -- On missing the wrong target -- Enlightenment and counter-Enlightenment in Irish philosophy -- The culmination and causation of Irish philosophy -- Francis Hutcheson on Berkeley and the Molyneux problem -- The impact of Irish philosophy on the American Enlightenment -- Irish ideology and philosophy -- An early essay concerning Berkeley's immaterialism -- Mrs. Berkeley's annotations in An account of the life of Berkeley (1776) -- Some new Bermuda Berkeleiana -- The good bishop : new letters -- Beckett (...)
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  19. David Berman (ed.) (1989). George Berkeley: Eighteenth-Century Responses. Garland Pub..
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  20. Daniele Bertini (2007). Berkeley and Gentile. Idealistic Studies 37 (1):43-50.
    My purpose is to compare Berkeley’s and Gentile’s idealism, interpreting Berkeley’s Treatise, §§22–23, and Gentile’s reading of this passage. The Italian philosopher finds in Berkeley’s master argument the original source of the true idealistic way of thinking, but he believes that Berkeley has not been sufficiently consistent in deducing all the consequences from his new principle. This criticism is the ground of Gentile’s actual idealism. Comparing the two positions is very instructive both to elucidate the general issue of idealism and (...)
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  21. Talia Mae Bettcher (1999). The Spirit and the Heap: Berkeley and Hume on the Self and Self-Consciousness. Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
    This dissertation concerns an important dispute between George Berkeley and David Hume. The dispute involves Berkeley's defense of his conception of the self as a spirit, a purely active being which perceives ideas; and Hume's elimination of that conception via his own, according to which the self is merely a heap, a causally connected system of perceptions. At bottom, this difference in the way that the self is conceptualized is informed by a fundamental difference in philosophical starting-point. Berkeley seeks to (...)
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  22. Martha Brandt Bolton (2008). Berkeley and Mental Representation : Why Not a Lockean Theory of Ideas? In Stephen H. Daniel (ed.), New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books
  23. Harry M. Bracken (1987). On Some Points in Bayle, Berkeley, and Hume. History of Philosophy Quarterly 4 (4):435 - 446.
  24. Harry M. Bracken (1977). Bayle, Berkeley and Hume. Eighteenth-Century Studies 11:227--45.
  25. Harry M. Bracken (1975). Berkeley: Irish Cartesian. Philosophical Studies 24 (101):39-51.
  26. Harry Mcfarland Bracken (1965). The Early Reception of Berkeley's Immaterialism, 1710-1733. M. Nijhoff.
  27. Costica Bradatan (2008). Review: Stephen Gersh and Dermot Moran, Eds. Eriugena, Berkeley, and the Idealist Tradition. [REVIEW] Berkeley Studies:40-43.
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  28. Costica Bradatan & Jaimir Conte (2010). George Berkeley e a tradição platônica. Princípios 16 (26):257-284.
    Existe já uma grande quantidade de literatura dedicada à presença na filosofia inicial de Berkeley de alguns assuntos tipicamente platônicos (arquétipos, o problema da mente de Deus, a relaçáo entre ideias e coisas, etc.). Baseados em alguns desses escritos, nas próprias palavras de Berkeley, assim como no exame de alguns elementos da tradiçáo platônica num amplo sentido, sugiro que, longe de serem apenas tópicos isolados, livremente espalhados nos primeiros escritos de Berkeley, eles formam uma perfeita rede de aspectos, atitudes e (...)
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  29. Michael Braund (2006). From Inference to Affordance : The Problem of Visual Depth-Perception in the Optical Writings of Descartes, Berkeley and Gibson. Dissertation,
  30. Wolfgang Breidert (1987). On the Early Reception of Berkeley in Germany. In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel
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  31. S. C. Brown (1971). Berkeley on the Unity of the Self. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 5:64-87.
    That the legacy of Berkeley's philosophy has been a largely sceptical one is perhaps rather surprising. For he himself took it as one of his objectives to undermine scepticism. He roundly denied that there were ‘any principles more opposite to Scepticism than those we have laid down’ . Yet Hume was to write of Berkeley that ‘most of the writings of that very ingenious author form the best lessons of scepticism, Bayle not excepted’. And it has become something of a (...)
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  32. Joseph William Browne (1972). Berkeley and Scholasticism. Modern Schoolman 49 (2):113-123.
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  33. Genevieve Brykman (2010). Berkeley, Spinoza, and the Radical Enlightenment. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer
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  34. M. F. Burnyeat (1982). Idealism and Greek Philosophy: What Descartes Saw and Berkeley Missed. Philosophical Review 91 (1):3-40.
  35. M. F. Burnyeat (1982). Idealism and Greek Philosophy: What Descartes Saw and Berkeley Missed. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 13:19-50.
  36. George C. Caffentzis (2010). Locke, Berkeley, and Hume as Philosophers of Money. In Silvia Parigi (ed.), George Berkeley: Religion and Science in the Age of Enlightenment. Springer
    For the last 30 years I have been writing a trilogy on Locke’s, Berkeley’s, and Hume’s philosophies of money. With the publication of Clipped Coins. Abused Words and Civil Government; John Locke’s Philosophy of Money and Exciting the Industry of Mankind; George Berkeley’s Philosophy of Money and with the last volume on Hume in preparation, the trilogy is now almost completed.
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  37. G. N. Cantor (1977). Berkeley, Reid, and the Mathematization of Mid-Eighteenth-Century Optics. Journal of the History of Ideas 38 (3):429.
    Berkeley's "new theory of vision" and, In particular, His sensationalist solution to the problem of judging distance and magnitude were discussed by many eighteenth-Century authors who faced a variety of problem situations. More specifically, Berkeley's theory fed into the debate over whether the phenomena of vision were susceptible to mathematical analysis or were experientially determined. In this paper a variety of responses to berkeley are examined, Concluding with thomas reid's attempt to distinguish physical optics (which can be analyzed geometrically) from (...)
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  38. James D. Carney (1959). G. E. Moore's Refutation of Berkeley's Idealism. Dissertation, The University of Nebraska - Lincoln
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  39. Sébastian Charles (2004). Berkeley no país das Luzes: ceticismo e solipsismo no século XVIII. Doispontos 1 (2).
    A influência do ceticismo nos século XVI e XVII é por demais evidente para ser posta em questão. De Montaigne a Bayle, parece que o cético foi o promotor tanto de uma refutação radical dos princípios metafísicos escolásticos e depois cartesianos quanto de uma crítica feroz às autoridades religiosas e políticas. Ora, esse papel parece ter se amenizado no Século das Luzes, ou melhor, se deslocado - somente as dimensões críticas do social continuaram pertinentes. Pretende-se mostrar aqui o pressuposto de (...)
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  40. Sebastien Charles (2015). De Pascal a Locke: la reprise berkeleyenne des enjeux philosophiques concernant la tolerance religieuse et civile. In Berkeley Revisited: Moral, Social and Political Philosophy. Voltaire Foundation 177-190.
  41. Sebastien Charles (2009). Berkeley and Campailla: Unsuccessful Meeting or Probable Influence? Giornale Critico Della Filosofia Italiana 5 (1):25-40.
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  42. Sébastien Charles (2002). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues. Background Source Materials Charles J. McCracken Et Ian C. Tipton Collection «Cambridge Philosophical Texts in Context» Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2000, X, 300 P. [REVIEW] Dialogue 41 (04):807-.
  43. Silvio Seno Chibeni (2013). As posições de Newton, Locke e Berkeley sobre a natureza da gravitação. Scientiae Studia 11 (4):811-839.
    Ao defender, nos Princípios matemáticos de filosofia natural, a existência de uma força de gravitação universal, Newton desencadeou uma onda de dúvidas e objeções filosóficas. Suas próprias declarações sobre a natureza da gravitação não são facilmente interpretáveis como formando um conjunto consistente de opiniões. Por um lado, logo após fornecer as três definições de "quantidades de forças centrípetas" (Defs. 6-8), Newton observa que está tratando tais forças "matematicamente", sem se pronunciar sobre sua realidade física. Mas, por outro lado, no Escólio (...)
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  44. Ewing Y. Chinn (1994). The Anti-Abstractionism of Dignāga and Berkeley. Philosophy East and West 44 (1):55-77.
  45. David Lee Clemenson (2001). Species, Ideas and Idealism: The Scholastic and Cartesian Background of Berkeley's Master Argument. Dissertation, Rice University
    This dissertation situates Berkeley's "master argument" for idealism in the context of Descartes' theory of ideas, and seeks to show that within that context the argument is convincing. In addition, the dissertation argues that Descartes' theory of ideas was not representationalist., as is often supposed, but a kind of direct realism; Cartesian ideas render intelligible individuals directly present to the intellect. In this respect Cartesian idea theory is very similar to a theory of species expounded by Antonio Rubio and other (...)
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  46. Grapham P. Conroy (1969). Did Hume Really Follow Berkeley. Philosophy 44 (169):238 - 242.
    The Bishop of Cloyne, George Berkeley, was the sort of philosopher who, although most genial himself, was quite apt to embroil opponents and critics of his time and of our own in long-lasting and sometimes unresolved controversies. In attacking the “infidel mathematicians”, the “minute philosophers” among the scientists, Berkeley initiated a controversy on behalf of religion by taking to task the theory of fluxions held by Sir Isaac Newton, his friends, and followers which, beginning with Berkeley's Analyst and replies to (...)
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  47. Vincent M. Cooke (1972). Locke, Berkeley, Hume. [REVIEW] International Philosophical Quarterly 12 (4):621-623.
  48. Stephen H. Daniel (2010). Berkeley and Spinoza. Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 200 (1):123-134.
    There is a widespread assumption that Berkeley and Spinoza have little in common, even though early Jesuit critics in France often linked them. Later commentators have also recognized their similarities. My essay focuses on how Berkeley 's comments on the Arnauld-Malebranche debate regarding objective and formal reality and his treatment of god's creation of finite minds within the order of nature relate his theory of knowledge to his doctrine in a way similar to that of Spinoza. On estime souvent que (...)
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  49. Stephen H. Daniel (2008). Berkeley's Stoic Notion of Spiritual Substance. In New Interpretations of Berkeley's Thought. Humanity Books
    For Berkeley, minds are not Cartesian spiritual substances because they cannot be said to exist (even if only conceptually) abstracted from their activities. Similarly, Berkeley's notion of mind differs from Locke's in that, for Berkeley, minds are not abstract substrata in which ideas inhere. Instead, Berkeley redefines what it means for the mind to be a substance in a way consistent with the Stoic logic of 17th century Ramists on which Leibniz and Jonathan Edwards draw. This view of mind, I (...)
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  50. Stephen H. Daniel (2001). Berkeley's Principles and Dialogues: Background Source Materials, Ed. McCracken & Tipton. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 21 (5):362-364.
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